PATTERNS IN MOTION K-1

PATTERNS IN MOTION

PATTERNS IN MOTION

Learning Description

Understand the structure of pattern and sequence through the elements of dance and choreography using movements that represent geometric shapes!

 

Learning Targets

GRADE BAND: K-1
CONTENT FOCUS: DANCE & MATH
LESSON DOWNLOADS:

Download PDF of this Lesson

"I Can" Statements

“I Can…”

  • I can recognize the difference between a pattern and a sequence in shapes and movements.

  • I can create choreography to represent a pattern or sequence.

  • I can create movements to represent geometric shapes.

Essential Questions

  • What are different ways we can represent sequence and patterns through movement?

  • How can I create choreography to represent a pattern or sequence?

  • How can I use movement to represent geometric shapes?

 

Georgia Standards

Curriculum Standards

Kindergarten: 

K.PAR.6: Explain, extend, and create repeating patterns with a repetition, not exceeding 4 and describe patterns involving the passage of time.

 

K.GSR.8: Identify, describe, and compare basic shapes encountered in the environment, and form two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional figures.

 

Grade 1: 

1.PAR.3: Identify, describe, extend, and create repeating patterns, growing patterns, and shrinking patterns found in real-life situations.

 

1.GSR.4: Compose shapes, analyze the attributes of shapes, and relate their parts to the whole.

 

 

 

 

Arts Standards

Kindergarten:

ESDK.CR.1 Demonstrate an understanding of the choreographic process. 

 

ESDK.CR.2 Demonstrate an understanding of dance as a form of communication. 

 

ESDK.PR.1 Identify and demonstrate movement elements, skills, and terminology in dance

 

ESDK.RE.1 Demonstrate critical and creative thinking in dance.

 

ESDK.CN.3 Identify connections between dance and other areas of knowledge.

 

Grade 1:

ESD1.CR.1 Demonstrate an understanding of the choreographic process.

 

ESD1.CR.2 Demonstrate an understanding of dance as a form of communication.

 

ESD1.PR.1 Identify and demonstrate movement elements, skills, and terminology in dance.

 

ESD1.RE.1 Demonstrate critical and creative thinking in dance.

 

ESD1.CN.3 Identify connections between dance and other areas of knowledge.

 

 

 

South Carolina Standards

Curriculum Standards

Kindergarten:

K.ATO.6 Describe simple repeating patterns using AB, AAB, ABB, and ABC type patterns.

 

K.G.2 Identify and describe a given shape and shapes of objects in everyday situations to include two-dimensional shapes (i.e., triangle, square, rectangle, hexagon, and circle) and three-dimensional shapes (i.e., cone, cube, cylinder, and sphere). 

 

Grade 1:1.ATO.9 Create, extend and explain using pictures and words for: a. repeating patterns (e.g., AB, AAB, ABB, and ABC type patterns); b. growing patterns (between 2 and 4 terms/figures).

 

1.G.4 Identify and name two-dimensional shapes (i.e., square, rectangle, triangle, hexagon, rhombus, trapezoid, and circle).

 

 

Arts Standards

Anchor Standard 1: I can use movement exploration to discover and create artistic ideas and works.

Anchor Standard 2: I can choreograph a dance.

Anchor Standard 3: I can perform movements using the dance elements.

Anchor Standard 5: I can describe, analyze, and evaluate a dance.

Anchor Standard 7: I can relate dance to other arts disciplines, content areas, and careers. 

 

 

 

Key Vocabulary

Content Vocabulary

  • Pattern - A set of elements repeated in a predictable manner
  • Sequence - A series of elements arranged with intention and does not always follow a pattern
  • Geometric shape - A figure that is defined by mathematical properties and is measurable

 

 

Arts Vocabulary

  • Choreography - The art of composing dances and planning and arranging the movements, steps, and patterns of dancers
  • Choreographer - A person who creates dances
  • Body shapes - Forms that the entire body or body parts take when making movement

 

 

Materials

    • Music source and speakers
    • Cards printed with shapes
    • Cards printed with groups of shapes in patterns or sequences

     

     

    Instructional Design

    Opening/Activating Strategy

    • Play music with a strong beat. As a class group, lead students in a warm up that establishes the beat of the music such as marching or clapping.
    • Next, lead them in making movements that have obvious geometric qualities using vocabulary from The Elements of Dance to describe body shapes. Examples include straight lines using arms and legs, rounded shapes using arms, etc.

     

    Work Session

    Movement discovery

    • Show students cards with geometric shapes printed on them and ask them to move to the beat to represent the shape of the card until you show a different card. Repeat this several times until students have discovered/created several different movements.

    Establish pattern versus sequence:

    • Continue the discovery activity holding the cards up for shorter periods of time and in patterns, ABAB at first and then more complicated. Open a handle question: How am I arranging the cards? How am I arranging your dance steps?
    • Ask students to explain the arrangement of the dance steps. They should arrive at the concept of patterns.
    • Repeat two previous steps using a sequence instead of a pattern.
    • Discuss the difference between a sequence and a pattern.

    Choreographic process

    • Divide students into small groups. Give each group a card printed with a pattern or a sequence represented in shapes. Without sharing with other groups, students identify whether their card shows a pattern or sequence.
    • Students create dances based on the order of shapes on their cards and the dance movements that they discovered during previous segments of the lesson. Encourage students to use movements from the warm-up or create new movements using the movements from warm-up as inspiration.
    • Allow students time to practice their dance.

    Performance

    • Peers identify whether the performing group is showing a sequence or pattern. When a pattern is performed, peers describe the pattern in terms of shapes represented by the dance movements.

    Closing Reflection

    • Groups explain why they chose certain movements to express certain shapes. 
    • Students discuss their understanding of the difference between a sequence and a pattern.

    Assessments

    Formative

    Teachers will assess understanding through: 

    • Student engagement in collaborative discussion about movement choices and math concepts.
    • Students’ use of dance vocabulary to describe body shapes during discussion.
    • Students’ progress toward a finished choreography during collaborative group work period.

     

     

    Summative

    CHECKLIST

    • Students can present choreography that accurately portrays their assigned pattern or sequence. 
    • Students can recognize the difference between a pattern and a sequence in shapes and movements.
    • Students can create dance movements that represent geometric shapes.
    • Students can explain why they chose certain movements to express certain shapes.
    • Peers/audience can accurately identify the pattern or sequence expressed in peer choreography.

     

    Differentiation

    Acceleration:

    • Have groups create their own patterns using movements that represent geometric shapes and lines.
    • Incorporate ELA concepts by having students use rhyming words to create a pattern (example: ABAB - Cat, fox, hat, box) and then create choreography to represent the pattern.

    Remediation:

    • Create choreography as a whole class to the same pattern or sequence. Then, break students into groups to create their choreography to their assigned pattern or sequence.
    • Establish certain movements for shapes as a class that all students will use in their pattern or sequence choreography. Once students demonstrate mastery of the pattern or sequence using movements established as a class, allow students to create or choose their own movements for their pattern or sequence.

     

     ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

    • Classroom Tips: Set up chairs and tables in a circular format to maximize students’  engagement and ability to see their peers during the activity and  performance. Also establish parameters for acceptable movement choices and discuss audience  behavior/etiquette with students.
    • The Elements of Dance

    *This integrated lesson provides differentiated ideas and activities for educators that are aligned to a sampling of standards. Standards referenced at the time of publishing may differ based on each state’s adoption of new standards.

    Ideas contributed and updated by: Julie Galle Baggenstoss and Melissa Dittmar-Joy. Updated by Katy Betts.

     

    Revised and copyright:  April 2024 @ ArtsNOW

    SNOW AND ONE “COOL” ANIMAL K-1

    SNOW AND ONE “COOL” ANIMAL

    SNOW AND ONE “COOL” ANIMAL

    Learning Description

    In this lesson, students will use what they learn about polar bears and the Elements of Art, Shape, Line, and Texture, to create an artistic representation of a polar bear.

     

    Learning Targets

    GRADE BAND: K-1
    CONTENT FOCUS: VISUAL ARTS, SCIENCE & ELA
    LESSON DOWNLOADS:

    Download PDF of this Lesson

    "I Can" Statements

    “I Can…”

    • I can use what I learned about polar bears to create an artistic representation of a polar bear using the Elements of Art, Line, Shape, and Texture.

    Essential Questions

    • How can I use what I learned about polar bears to create an artistic representation using the Elements of Art, Line, Shape, and Texture?

     

    Georgia Standards

    Curriculum Standards

    Kindergarten

    ELA

    ELAGSEKRL10 Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.

    ELAGSEKRI1 With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

    Science

    SKL1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about how organisms (alive and not alive) and non-living objects are grouped.

     

    Grade 1

    ELA

    ELAGSE1RI1 Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

    ELAGSE1RI2 Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.

    Science

    S1L1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about the basic needs of plants and animals.

     

     

    Arts Standards

    Kindergarten

    VAK.CR.1 Engage in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas by using subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning.

    VAK.CR.2 Create works of art based on selected themes.

    VAK.CR.3 Understand and apply media, techniques, and processes of two-dimensional art.

    VAK.CN.2 Integrate information from other disciplines to enhance the understanding and production of works of art. 

     

    Grade 1

    VA1.CR.1 Engage in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas by using subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning.

    VA1.CR.2 Create works of art based on selected themes. 

    VA1.CR.3 Understand and apply media, techniques, and processes of two-dimensional art.

    VA1.CN.2 Integrate information from other disciplines to enhance the understanding and production of works of art.

     

     

     

     

    South Carolina Standards

    Curriculum Standards

    Kindergarten

    ELA

    INQUIRY-BASED LITERARY STANDARDS 

    Standard 2: Transact with texts to formulate questions, propose explanations, and consider alternative views and multiple perspectives.

    2.1 With guidance and support, engage in daily explorations of texts to make connections to personal experiences, other texts, or the environment.

     

    RANGE AND COMPLEXITY 

    Standard 13: Read independently and comprehend a variety of texts for the purposes of reading for enjoyment, acquiring new learning, and building stamina; reflect and respond to increasingly complex text over time.

    13.1 Engage in whole and small group reading with purpose and understanding.

     

    Science

    K-ESS2-2. Construct an argument supported by evidence for how plants and animals (including humans) can change the environment to meet their needs.

     

    Grade 1

    INQUIRY-BASED LITERARY STANDARDS 

    Standard 2: Transact with texts to formulate questions, propose explanations, and consider alternative views and multiple perspectives.

    2.1 Engage in daily explorations of texts to make connections to personal experiences, other texts, or the environment.

     

    RANGE AND COMPLEXITY 

    Standard 13: Read independently and comprehend a variety of texts for the purposes of reading for enjoyment, acquiring new learning, and building stamina; reflect and respond to increasingly complex text over time.

    13.1 Engage in whole and small group reading with purpose and understanding.

     

    Science

    1-LS1-2. Obtain information from multiple sources to determine patterns in parent and offspring behavior that help offspring survive.

     

     

    Arts Standards

    Artistic Processes: Creating- I can make artwork using a variety of materials, techniques, and processes.

    Anchor Standard 1: I can use the elements and principles of art to create artwork.

    Anchor Standard 2: I can use different materials, techniques, and processes to make art.

     

    Artistic Processes: Responding- I can evaluate and communicate about the meaning in my artwork and the artwork of others.

    Anchor Standard 5: I can interpret (read) and evaluate the meaning of an artwork.

     

    Artistic Processes: Connecting- I can relate artistic ideas and work with personal meaning and external context.

    Anchor Standard 7: I can relate visual arts ideas to other arts disciplines, content areas, and careers.

     

     

     

    Key Vocabulary

    Content Vocabulary

    • Arctic – The northernmost region of the Earth
    • Aquatic – Water
    • Mammal – Animals that have fur, drink their mother’s milk, and are warm-blooded
    • Shore – The land by the edge of the water
    • Seals – Web-footed aquatic mammals that live chiefly in cold seas and whose body shape, round at the middle and tapered at the ends, is adapted to swift and graceful swimming

     

    Arts Vocabulary

    • Line – A short or long narrow mark
    • Texture – The way something feels or looks like it feels (soft, fuzzy, rough, etc.)
    • Shape – A two-dimensional or flat object. In art, it can be organic or geometric.

     

     

    Materials

    • Blue paper plates for each student
    • Construction cut outs of ears and mouth
    • 1 set of googly eyes per student
    • Clothespin paintbrush (clothespin with cotton ball on top)
    • White paint
    • Plastic fork for each student
    • Plastic cup for fake snow
    • Fake snow: 
    • Wet wipes to clean hands

     

    Instructional Design

    Opening/Activating Strategy

    • Show pictures of snowflakes floating. Ask students what they notice about the snowflakes. Direct students towards noticing shapes and lines. Ask students how they imagine they might feel (warm, cold) and what they might smell. 
    • Tell the students they will be learning about using art materials such as white paint and fake snow to create their own “cool” animal, the Polar Bear.

     

    Work Session

    • Show students where they live on a globe or map for reference. Next, show students where the Arctic is located. Ask students what they think it would feel like to be in this place. What colors would they see? What textures would they feel? Would it be warm or cool?
    • Read an informational book such as Polar Bear (Read and Learn: A Day in the Life: Polar Animals) by Katie Marsico. Ask students to connect the information in the book to the photos. Ask students to identify how the photos explain the text.
    • Show the students an image of a polar bear and define mammals, arctic, aquatic, and shore. Briefly identify each word so they are familiar with the vocabulary. 
    • As a whole group, go over what polar bears do, how the different parts of their bodies help them survive, and where they live. Show students photos and briefly provide information.
    • Ask students to identify characteristics of the polar bear such as color, size in relation to other animals, and texture.
      • Explain that next, they will use their art materials to create their own polar bear. 
      • Tell students that artists use color, size, and texture to express their ideas in their art.
    • Show the exemplar of the polar bear art. Ask students to describe the texture, lines, and shapes that they see that make the artwork. 
    • Demonstrate how to make fake snow (see “materials”). 
      • Help students notice what happens when baking soda is mixed with conditioner. 
      • Put some of the fake snow in their plastic cups for them to touch and feel. 
      • Ask them to describe the texture. 
      • (Teacher note: Remind them that the snow is not real, and we never put anything in our mouths.)
    • Go over the directions of how to make the polar bear using a fork to create texture.
      • Place about a tablespoon of white acrylic paint on a paper plate. 
      • Pass out the following materials to each student: plastic fork, blue paper plate (navy works best), two pre-cut/pre-glued shapes for ears and nose/mouth, one set of “googly” eyes. (Give students the choice of what eyes they want to use to personalize their polar bear.)
      • When they have all their materials, explain to students that they will start creating the element of art, texture, by dipping the fork in the white paint and pressing down in the center of the navy-blue plate. When you see their forks in the center, explain that they have to gently press and pull to create the texture look of a polar bear’s fur. They can re-dip when necessary.
      • Explain to the students to keep pressing and pulling until their blue plate is filled up. This will represent the face of the polar bear. 
      • When the students have finished the painting, have them take their nose/mouth and ears and place them where they think a nose/mouth and ears would be on a polar bear. 
      • After the teacher has checked, give students a glue stick to glue the nose/mouth and ears down. 
      • Tell students that next they will “glue” on their googly eyes. Explain that the wet paint will serve as glue for holding down the eyes, nose/mouth.

     

    Closing Reflection

    • Have each student create and write a name for their polar bear. Remind students that proper nouns start with a capital letter.
    • Allow students to verbally introduce their polar bears to their classmates. Have the students say, “Hi, my polar bear’s name is….” The other students will say,

    “Hi, (name of polar bear)”. This reinforces their speaking/communication skills.

     

    Assessments

    Formative

    Observation of:

    • Collaboration
    • Communication
    • Creativity
    • CompletioN

       

      Summative

      CHECKLIST

      • Students can explain what polar bears do, how the different parts of their bodies help them survive in the Arctic, and where they live. 
      • Students can use texture, line, and shape to create a polar bear.

       

       

       

      Differentiation

      Acceleration: 

      • Students can use their completed polar bear to write their bear’s name and a complete sentence about their polar bear.

      Remediation: 

      • The teacher should work with identified children to assist with painting.
      • Allow students to work in pairs; pair students who are higher achieving with students who may struggle.

       

       ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

      • Optional: An informational text such as Polar Bear (Read and Learn: A Day in the Life: Polar Animals) by Katie Marsico

       

      *This integrated lesson provides differentiated ideas and activities for educators that are aligned to a sampling of standards. Standards referenced at the time of publishing may differ based on each state’s adoption of new standards.

      Ideas contributed by:  Kim Spivey 

      Revised and copyright:  2024 @ ArtsNOW

      When a line becomes a shape K-1

      WHEN A LINE BECOMES A SHAPE

      WHEN A LINE BECOMES A SHAPE

      Learning Description

      In this lesson, students will learn about lines and shapes through the book, When a Line Bends…A Shape Begins. Students will be able to name and describe shapes, identify them in their environment, create a character out of shapes, and write a sentence summary about the defining attributes of their shape.

       

      Learning Targets

      GRADE BAND: K-1
      CONTENT FOCUS: VISUAL ARTS & MATH
      LESSON DOWNLOADS:

      Download PDF of this Lesson

      "I Can" Statements

      “I Can…”

      • I can identify different kinds of geometric shapes.
      • I can draw geometric shapes.
      • I can create a character out of a geometric shape.
      • I can write about the attributes of geometric shapes.

      Essential Questions

      • What are the different types of geometric shapes?

      • How can I draw geometric shapes?

      • How can I create a character out of a geometric shape?

      • How can I describe the attributes of a shape in written form?

       

      Georgia Standards

      Curriculum Standards

      Kindergarten:

      K.GSR.8: Identify, describe, and compare basic shapes encountered in the environment, and form two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional figures.

       

      Grade 1:

      1.GSR.4: Compose shapes, analyze the attributes of shapes, and relate their parts to the whole.

       

      Arts Standards

      Kindergarten

      VAK.CR.1 Engage in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas by using subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning.

      VAK.CR.2 Create works of art based on selected themes.

      VAK.CR.3 Understand and apply media, techniques, and processes of two-dimensional art.

      VAK.RE.1 Discuss personal works of art and the artwork of others to enhance visual literacy. 

      VAK.CN.3 Develop life skills through the study and production of art (e.g. collaboration, creativity, critical thinking, communication).

       

      Grade 1

      VA1.CR.1 Engage in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas by using subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning.

      VA1.CR.2 Create works of art based on selected themes. 

      VA1.CR.3 Understand and apply media, techniques, and processes of two-dimensional art.

      VA1.RE.1 Discuss personal works of art and the artwork of others to enhance visual literacy.

      VA1.CN.3 Develop life skills through the study and production of art (e.g. collaboration, creativity, critical thinking, communication).

       

       

       

      South Carolina Standards

      Curriculum Standards

      Kindergarten

      K.G.2 Identify and describe a given shape and shapes of objects in everyday situations to include two-dimensional shapes (i.e., triangle, square, rectangle, hexagon, and circle) and three-dimensional shapes (i.e., cone, cube, cylinder, and sphere). 

       

      K.G.5 Draw two-dimensional shapes (i.e., square, rectangle, triangle, hexagon, and circle) and create models of three-dimensional shapes (i.e., cone, cube, cylinder, and sphere).

       

      Grade 1

      1.G.1 Distinguish between a two-dimensional shape’s defining (e.g., number of sides) and non-defining attributes (e.g., color). 

       

      1.G.4 Identify and name two-dimensional shapes (i.e., square, rectangle, triangle, hexagon, rhombus, trapezoid, and circle).

       

      Arts Standards

      Anchor Standard 1: I can use the elements and principles of art to create artwork.

      Anchor Standard 2: I can use different materials, techniques, and processes to make art.

      Anchor Standard 3: I can improve and complete artistic work using elements and principles.

      Anchor Standard 4: I can organize work for presentation and documentation to reflect specific content, ideas, skills, and or media.

       

       

      Key Vocabulary

      Content Vocabulary

      • Capital/uppercase letter - The first letter of a sentence or a proper noun
      • Period - A punctuation mark that indicates the end of a sentence
      • Geometric shape - A flat, two-dimensional figure that has specific characteristics and can be identified by its attributes 
      • Edge - The side of a shape
      • Vertices - Angles

       

      Arts Vocabulary

      • Line - One of the seven elements of art; the path of a moving point
      • Shape - One of the seven elements of art; an enclosed line; two-dimensional object

       

       

      Materials

      • Pieces of yarn (some long, some medium, and some short)
      • Types of Shapes handout - one per student
      • White paper
      • Crayons or markers
      • Construction paper
      • Glue sticks
      • When a Line Bends…A Shape Begins

       

      Instructional Design

      Opening/Activating Strategy

      • Give students several pieces of yarn of different lengths and the Types of Shapes handout. Tell students that shapes are made from connected lines. Have students practice outlining the shapes using yarn as lines.

       

      Work Session

      • Show students the cover of the book, When a Line Bends, A Shape Begins. Ask students to help identify the title, author, and illustrator.
      • Tell students that today they are going to learn about different kinds of shapes through the book, When a Line Bends…A Shape Begins. As you read the book to students, have students practice making the shape discussed by manipulating their yarn. Ask students how many pieces of yarn they need to make the shape to help them understand the number of sides/edges and vertices each shape has.
      • After reading the book, ask students what the book was about to check for understanding. Ask them about the different kinds of shapes they learned about and where they can see examples of these shapes in the classroom. 
      • Tell students that they are going to be making shape characters. Assign each student a shape (square, circle, rectangle, triangle, etc). Tell students that their shape will become a character–it needs to have the correct number of vertices and sides/edges as well as arms, legs, hair, and a face. 
      • Students should first draw their shape large on construction paper. 
      • Then, students should cut it out and glue it on a white piece of paper. 
      • Finally, students can add a face, arms, legs, hair, etc. using crayons or markers.
      • Once students create their shape characters, they will write a sentence about their character. Their sentence should say what type of shape it is, how many lines are used to make it (how many sides), and what they choose to name their shape. Students should focus on using correct punctuation in their sentences (beginning with a capital letter and ending with a period).

       

      Closing Reflection

      Have students get in groups of four so that each member of the group has a different shape. Students should take turns presenting their shape character and reading their sentence to the group.

       

      Assessments

      Formative

      • Teachers will assess understanding through:

        • Students’ yarn shapes that they make as they read the book
        • Class discussion after reading the book to see if students understood the book and can identify types of shapes in the classroom

       

      Summative

      CHECKLIST

        • Students’ shape characters should have the correct number of vertices and sides/edges.
        • Students’ sentences about their shape character should begin with an uppercase letter and end with a period. They should include the attributes of their shape.

       

       

      Differentiation

      Acceleration: 

      • Have students work together to create a story in which their shape characters interact. Have students develop a beginning, middle, and end to their story. Students can either draw or write the beginning, middle, and end of the story depending on the student’s abilities.

      Remediation: 

      • Instead of having students use yarn to make the shapes, have them trace the shapes with their pencils or a colored crayon. 
      • Have students answer verbally or in non-sentence written form the type of shape character they created and the number of sides/lines used to create the shape.

       ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

      Types of Shapes handout

      When a Line Bends…A Shape Begins read aloud

      *This integrated lesson provides differentiated ideas and activities for educators that are aligned to a sampling of standards. Standards referenced at the time of publishing may differ based on each state’s adoption of new standards.

       

      Ideas contributed by:  Katy Betts

       

      Revised and copyright:  September 2023 @ ArtsNOW

       

      DANCING THROUGH SENTENCE STRUCTURE K-1

      DANCING THROUGH SENTENCE STRUCTURE

      DANCING THROUGH SENTENCE STRUCTURE

      Learning Description

      This lesson allows students to explore sentence structure through movement and choreographicsequences. Discover how to integrate dance into your language arts curriculum and engage yourstudents in a brand-new way!

       

      Learning Targets

      GRADE BAND: K-1
      CONTENT FOCUS: DANCE & ELA
      LESSON DOWNLOADS:

      Download PDF of this Lesson

      "I Can" Statements

      “I Can…”

      • I can identify types of sentences.

      • I can identify parts of speech.

      • I can use movement to express the intent of a sentence, i.e., strong emotion, a question, or a command.

      • I can choreograph a dance based on a given structure.

      Essential Questions

      • How can movement help us identify parts of speech and sentence type? 

       

      Georgia Standards

      Curriculum Standards

      Kindergarten:

      ELAGSEKL1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. 

      ELAGSEKL2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

       

       

      Grade 1:

      ELAGSE1L1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

      ELAGSE1L2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

       

       

      Arts Standards

      Kindergarten:

      ESDK.CR.1 Demonstrate an understanding of the choreographic process.

      ESDK.CR.2 Demonstrate an understanding of dance as a form of communication

      ESDK.PR.1 Identify and demonstrate movement elements, skills, and terminology in dance.

      ESDK.RE.1 Demonstrate critical and creative thinking in dance.

      ESDK.CN.3 Identify connections between dance and other areas of knowledge.

       

      Grade 1:

      ESD1.CR.1 Demonstrate an understanding of the choreographic process. 

      ESD1.CR.2 Demonstrate an understanding of dance as a form of communication

      ESD1.PR.1 Identify and demonstrate movement elements, skills, and terminology in dance.

      ESD2.CN.3 Identify connections between dance and other areas of knowledge.

       

       

      South Carolina Standards

      Curriculum Standards

      Kindergarten:

      K.W.MCC.4.1 With guidance and support, use nouns.

      K.W.MCC.4.3 With guidance and support, understand and use interrogatives. 

      K.W.MCC.4.4 With guidance and support, use verbs.

      K.C.MC.1.4 Participate in conversations with varied partners about focused grade level topics and texts in small and large groups. 

       

      Grade 1:

      1.W.MCC.4.1 Use common, proper, and possessive nouns. 

      1.W.MC.4.2 Use singular and plural nouns with matching verbs in basic sentences. 

      1.W.MC.4.8 Produce and expand complete simple and compound declarative, interrogative, imperative, and exclamatory sentences. 

       

      Arts Standards

      Anchor Standard 1: I can use movement exploration to discover and create artistic ideas and works.

      Anchor Standard 2: I can choreograph a dance.

      Anchor Standard 3: I can perform movements using the dance elements.

      Anchor Standard 5: I can describe, analyze, and evaluate a dance.

      Anchor Standard 7: I can relate dance to other arts disciplines, content areas, and careers.

       

       

       

      Key Vocabulary

      Content Vocabulary

      Sentence Types

      • Interrogative - A sentence that asks a question and ends with a question mark.
      • Imperative - A sentence that gives a command or makes a request. 
      • Exclamatory - A sentence that shows strong emotion and ends with an exclamation mark. 
      • Declarative - A sentence that makes a statement and ends with a period.
      • Punctuation - Marks used in writing to separate words and numerals.

      Arts Vocabulary

      • Locomotor - Movement that travels from one location to another in a pathway through space

      • Non locomotor - Movement that occurs without the body traveling from one point to another point.

      Energy Qualities 

      • Percussive - A quality of movement characterized by sharp starts and stops, staccato jabs of energy.  
      • Suspended - A quality of movement that occurs in a moment of resistance to gravity, such as the instant in which a dancer hangs in space at the top of a leap.  
      • Sustained - A quality of movement that is smooth and unaccented. There is no apparent start or stop, only a continuity of energy.  
      • Swinging - A quality of movement established by a fall with gravity, a gain in momentum, a loss of momentum, and the repeated cycle of fall and recovery, like that of a pendulum.  
      • Vibratory - A quality of movement characterized by rapidly repeated bursts of percussive movements, like a jitter. 

       

       

      Materials

      • Sound source (CD player, iPod) and speaker  
      • Audio recording 
      • Cards with printed sentences 

       

      Instructional Design

      Opening/Activating Strategy

      • As a group, lead students in a warm up that includes these dance elements:

        • Movement energy qualities, including percussive, suspended, sustained, swinging, and vibratory. 
        • Locomotor and non-locomotor movements.
        • Identify these dance elements so that students learn dance vocabulary.

       

      Work Session

      ELA Discussion

      • Ask students to identify different sentence types (declarative, interrogative, exclamatory, and imperative). 
      • Ask students to match a movement quality of their choice to each sentence type. 
      • Ask students to identify the following parts of speech: verb, noun, pronoun, adjective, and adverb. 

      Small group choreography 

      • Divide students into groups and ask each group to create a movement/shape for each part of speech. Each group will create five movements. 
      • Now, give each group a card with a sentence on it. The members will need to identify the underlined parts of speech and the sentence type. 
      • Group members choreograph a short movement phrase that demonstrates the correct order of the underlined parts of speech as they appear, as well as the movement quality that matches the overall sentence type. 

      Presentation

      Once students have completed their choreographies, each group will present its sentence, identify the parts of speech, and present their choreography to the class. Option to choose music for each dance.

       

      Closing Reflection

      Ask students to explain, using dance vocabulary, how a movement of a peer group expresses a certain part of speech.

       

      Ask students to explain why they chose certain movements to express certain parts of speech.

       

       

       

      Assessments

      Formative

      • Students engage in collaborative discussion about movement choices and parts of speech.

      • Students correctly use dance vocabulary during discussion.

       

      Summative

      • Students correctly identify parts of speech and sentence types. 

      • The form and sequence of a group choreography correctly matched the sequence of the assigned sentence. 

      • Movements were correctly performed.

       

       

      Differentiation

      Acceleration: 

      Add layers to the choreographic process to:

      • Include transitions
      • Vary movements to show a clear beginning, middle, and end expressed in terms of movement (as opposed to simply following the order given by the sentence).

      Remediation:

      As a class, identify the underlined parts of speech and the sentence type and then assign groups to match movements with parts of speech.

       ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

      As part of the standards discussion but not standards themselves, the statements below reflect the connection between the choreographic process and the writing process and are interesting to consider while implementing this lesson. 

      Fundamentals of Writing  

      Employ a recursive writing process that includes planning, drafting, revising, editing, rewriting, publishing, and reflecting.  

      Interact and collaborate with peers and adults to develop and strengthen writing.  

      Produce writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, discipline, and audience. 

      Fundamentals of Communication  

      Employ a reciprocal communication process that includes planning, drafting, revising, editing, reviewing, presenting, and reflecting.  

      Communicate using style, language, and nonverbal cues appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.  

      Use active and attentive communication skills, building on other’s ideas to explore, learn, enjoy, argue, and exchange information.  

      Monitor delivery and reception throughout the communication process and adjust approach and strategies as needed.

      *This integrated lesson provides differentiated ideas and activities for educators that are aligned to a sampling of standards. Standards referenced at the time of publishing may differ based on each state’s adoption of new standards.

       Ideas contributed and updated by: Melissa Dittmar-Joy and Julie Galle Baggenstoss

       Revised and copyright:  August 2022 @ ArtsNOW

       

      Rhyming Animals

      RHYMING ANIMALS

      RHYMING ANIMALS

      Learning Description

      Students will learn about rhyming families by creating “cut-outs” of animals inspired by the artist, Henri Matisse, combined with a rhyming word.

       

      Learning Targets

      GRADE BAND: K-1
      CONTENT FOCUS: VISUAL ARTS & ELA
      LESSON DOWNLOADS:

      Download PDF of this Lesson

      "I Can" Statements

      “I Can…”

      • I can create rhymes using Matisse-inspired cut-outs.

      Essential Questions

      • How can I create a rhyme using Matisse-inspired cut-outs?

       

      Georgia Standards

      Curriculum Standards

      Kindergarten:

      ELAGSEKRF2 Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes).

      ELAGSEKSL1 Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about kindergarten topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

      ELAGSEKSL4 Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with prompting and support, provide additional detail.

      Grade1:  

      ELAGSE1RF2 Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes).

      ELAGSE1SL1 Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

      ELAGSE1SL4 Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly.

      Arts Standards

      Kindergarten & Grade 1:

      VAK.CR.1 Engage in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas by using subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning.

      VAK&1.CR.2 Create works of art based on selected themes.

      VAK&1.CR.3 Understand and apply media, techniques, and processes of two-dimensional art.

      VAK&1.RE.1 Discuss personal works of art and the artwork of others to enhance visual literacy. 

      VAK&1.CN.3 Develop life skills through the study and production of art (e.g. collaboration, creativity, critical thinking, communication).

       

      South Carolina Standards

      Curriculum Standards

      Kindergarten:

      K.I.1.1 Engage in daily opportunities for play and exploration to foster a sense of curiosity, develop the disposition of inquisitiveness, and begin to verbally articulate “I wonders” about ideas of interest.

      K.RL.2.1 Recognize and produce rhyming words

      K.C.MC.1.1 Explore and create meaning through play, conversation, drama, and storytelling.

      K.C.MC.3.2 Use appropriate props, images, or illustrations to support verbal communication.

      Grade 1:  

      1.I.1.1 Translate “wonderings” into questions that lead to group conversations, explorations, and investigations.

      1.RL.9.1 Identify the literary devices of rhythm, repetitive language, and simile and sound devices of rhyme, onomatopoeia, and alliteration; explain how the author uses each. 

      1.C.MC.1.1 Explore and create meaning through conversation, drama, questioning, and story-telling. 

      1.C.MC.3.1 Explore and compare how ideas and topics are depicted in a variety of media and formats.

      Arts Standards

      Anchor Standard 1: I can use the elements and principles of art to create artwork.

      Anchor Standard 2: I can use different materials, techniques, and processes to make art.

      Anchor Standard 3: I can improve and complete artistic work using elements and principles.

      Anchor Standard 4: I can organize work for presentation and documentation to reflect specific content, ideas, skills, and or media.

       

      Key Vocabulary

      Content Vocabulary

      Rhyme – Words that have the same middle sound.

      Arts Vocabulary

      Geometric shape – One of the seven elements of art; a two-dimensional object such as a square, triangle, or circle.

      Cut-outs/collage - An image created using a combination of pieces of paper or images.

       

      Materials

      • Construction paper
      • Glue sticks
      • A variety of geometric shapes such as circles, squares, rectangles, and triangles

       

      Instructional Design

      Opening/Activating Strategy

      • Show students an image of Henri Matisse’s, The Horse, the Rider, and the Clown. Ask students to find things that they recognize in this image (colors, shapes, etc.).
      • Tell students that they will be learning about how the artist, Henri Matisse, created this artwork using paper and scissors.
      • Explain to students that there are different kinds of shapes in art:  geometric, organic, and free-form. Show students the different types of shapes.
      • Ask students to practice creating geometric shapes using their hands or arms.
      • Ask students to identify the types of shapes in Matisse’s, The Horse, the Rider, and the Clown.

       

      Work Session

      • Explain that the artist, Henri Matisse, created images by cutting out pieces of paper and putting them together to make images. 
      • Show students several examples of Matisse’s cut-outs.
      • Show students Matisse’s, The Snail, as an example. Ask students if they can see the snail in the image.
      • Tell students that they will be creating cut-outs like Matisse that combine an animal with a rhyming word.
      • Go over a family of words that rhyme with an animal such as a cat, dog, frog, etc.
      • Show students how to use geometric shapes to create an animal. 
      • Ask students to combine the animal with a word that it rhymes with to create a cut-out like Matisse.

      Closing Reflection

      • Ask students to write the two words that they showed in their artwork (i.e. cat and hat) in a complete sentence with correct grammar, such as “The cat wears a hat.” 
      • Students will conduct a gallery walk to see each other’s artwork and see the different words that their animal rhymes with.

       

      Assessments

      Formative

      • Student discussion of rhyming families
      • Student identification of a word that rhymes with the given animal

       

      Summative

      • Student “cut-outs” of animal and word that it rhymes with - student artwork should demonstrate that students understand that some words have the same median sounds.

       

      Differentiation

      Acceleration: Students should come up with their own animal and a word that it rhymes with instead of the provided animal and words that it rhymes with to create their artwork.

      Remediation: Provide students with the animal and the word that it rhymes with; after students have created this artwork, ask them to identify another word that rhymes with the animal and the word it rhymes with. Ask students to add this word to their artwork.

       ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

      Rhyming Animals presentation 

      Types of Shapes handout

      Optional supporting text: Henri’s Scissors by Jeanette Winter

      *This integrated lesson provides differentiated ideas and activities for educators that are aligned to a sampling of standards. Standards referenced at the time of publishing may differ based on each state’s adoption of new standards.

       Ideas contributed by:  Katy Betts

       Revised and copyright:  September 2023 @ ArtsNOW