EXPLORING NARRATIVE WRITING THROUGH STILL LIFE DRAWING 2-3

EXPLORING NARRATIVE WRITING THROUGH STILL LIFE DRAWING

EXPLORING NARRATIVE WRITING THROUGH STILL LIFE DRAWING

Learning Description

Students will build a still life composition, explore the space with their senses, draw what they see, and write a narrative from the point of view of one of the objects in their still life using descriptive details.

 

Learning Targets

GRADE BAND: 2-3
CONTENT FOCUS: Visual Arts & ELA
LESSON DOWNLOADS:

Download PDF of this Lesson

"I Can" Statements

“I Can…”

  • I can arrange objects to create a still life.

  • I can use a still life as an engaging writing prompt.

Essential Questions

  • How can I arrange objects to create a still life?

  • How can I use a still life as an engaging writing prompt?

 

Georgia Standards

Curriculum Standards

Grade 2:

ELAGSE2W3 Write narratives in which they recount a well-elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.

 

ELAGSE2SL4 Tell a story or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking audibly in coherent sentences.

 

Grade 3: 

ELAGSE3W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

 

ELAGSE3SL4 Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience with appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details, speaking clearly at an understandable pace.

 

 

Arts Standards

Grade 2:

VA2.CR.1 Engage in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas by using subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning. 

 

VA2.CR.2 Create works of art based on selected themes. 

 

VA2.RE.1 Discuss personal works of art and the artwork of others to enhance visual literacy.

 

Grade 3: 

VA3.CR.1 Engage in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas by using subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning.

 

VA3.CR.2 Create works of art based on selected themes. 

 

VA3.RE.1 Use a variety of approaches for art criticism and to critique personal works of art and the artwork of others to enhance visual literacy.

 

 

South Carolina Standards

Curriculum Standards

Grade 2

WRITING (W) - Meaning, Context, and Craft

Standard 3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective techniques, well-chosen details, and well structured event sequences.

3.1 Explore multiple texts to write narratives that recount a well-elaborated event or short sequence of events; include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings; use temporal words to signal event order; and provide a sense of closure.

 

Grade 3

WRITING (W) - Meaning, Context, and Craft

Standard 3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective techniques, well-chosen details, and well structured event sequences.

3.1 Gather ideas from texts, multimedia, and personal experience to write narratives that: a. develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences; c. organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally; d. use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings to develop experiences and events or show the response of characters to situations; g. use imagery, precise words, and sensory details to develop characters and convey experiences and events; and h. provide a sense of closure.

 

 

Arts Standards

Anchor Standard 1: I can use the elements and principles of art to create artwork.

Anchor Standard 2: I can use different materials, techniques, and processes to make art.

Anchor Standard 7: I can relate visual arts ideas to other arts disciplines, content areas, and careers.

 

 

 

Key Vocabulary

Content Vocabulary

  • Narrative - A piece of writing that usually tells a story and has a beginning, middle, and end
  • Descriptive details - Details that enhance a reader’s understanding of the text
  • Point of view - The perspective from which the story is told

Arts Vocabulary

  • Still Life - A painting or drawing of an arrangement of objects, typically including fruit and flowers and objects contrasting with these in texture, such as bowls and glassware
  • Texture - One of the seven elements of art; it is how something feels or looks like it would feel
  • Composition – The placement or arrangement of the visual elements, such as figures, trees, and so on in a work of art, as distinct from the subject or the style with which it is depicted
  • Balance - How the elements of art (line, shape, color, value, space, form, texture) relate to each other within the composition in terms of their visual weight to create visual equilibrium
  • Shape - In the visual arts, shape is a flat, enclosed area of an artwork created through lines, textures, colors or an area enclosed by other shapes such as triangles, circles, and squares
  • Form - A three-dimensional composition or object
  • Color - One of the elements of art; reflected or absorbed light
  • Emotions – Feelings

 

Materials

  • Flowers, pots, plants, fabric or any other interesting elements
  • Paper 
  • Pencils 
  • Colored pencils or other coloring materials

     

     

    Instructional Design

    Opening/Activating Strategy

       

      Work Session

      • Explain to students that artists have painted and drawn still lives for centuries. 
        • A still life is a painting or drawing of an arrangement of non-living objects. Still lives typically include fruit and flowers and objects contrasting with these in texture, such as bowls and glassware.
      • Look at several examples of still lives. 
        • Remind students what descriptive details are. Ask students to use descriptive details to describe the still lives. Ask them to focus on color, shape, and texture, which are all elements of art.
      • Explain to students that they will be creating their own still life in small groups. 
        • Students should work together to select several objects with a variety of textures for their still life and arrange them in the center of their table. 
        • Each student will find a place around their table to carefully observe and draw the still life. 
      • Explain that students will be writing a narrative from the point of view of one of the objects in their still life drawing. 
        • Remind students that point of view is the way a character sees the events in a story, so, the point of view of each of the objects in the still life will be different.
        • Project the still life from the opening activity. Model how to select one of the objects and write a narrative from that object’s point of view using descriptive details.
        • Students will then choose an object from their own still life drawing and write a narrative from the object’s point of view using descriptive details. 
        • Remind students that their narrative must have a beginning, middle, and end.

       

       

      Closing Reflection

      Within their small groups, students should share their still life drawings and narrative writing. Encourage students to notice how each person’s drawing is different based on where they were observing the still life arrangement.

       

      Assessments

      Formative

      Teachers will assess students’ understanding by observing students’ answers to class and small group discussion of point of view and still lives, as well as students’ ability to create a still life arrangements.

       

       

       

       

      Summative

      CHECKLIST

      • Students can create a still life arrangement and drawing.
      • Students can write a narrative from the point of view of an object in their still life using descriptive details.
      • Students can write a narrative that has a beginning, middle and end.

       

       

       

       

      Differentiation

      Acceleration: As an extension, students can pair up and write a dialogue between their object and someone else's.

      Remediation: 

      • Allow students to write narratives with a partner. 
      • Provide students with a writing guide/graphic organizer for their narrative writing.
      • Allow students to orally relay their narrative. 
      • Assign students one of the objects in the still life to use for their narrative writing.

       ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

      Still life examples to show students: 

      Technology Extension: 

      Technology Resources: 

       

      *This integrated lesson provides differentiated ideas and activities for educators that are aligned to a sampling of standards. Standards referenced at the time of publishing may differ based on each state’s adoption of new standards.

      Ideas contributed by: Shannon Green; updated by Katy Betts

      Revised and copyright:  May 2024 @ ArtsNOW

       

      UNDERSTANDING INFORMATIONAL TEXT THROUGH LANDSCAPE ART 6-8

      UNDERSTANDING INFORMATIONAL TEXT
      THROUGH LANDSCAPE ART

      MOSAICS AND MATH

      Learning Description

      In this lesson, students will demonstrate their understanding of informational texts by using text evidence to create a landscape artwork.

       

      Learning Targets

      GRADE BAND: 6-8
      CONTENT FOCUS: VISUAL ARTS, ELA, SOCIAL STUDIES
      LESSON DOWNLOADS:

      Download PDF of this Lesson

      "I Can" Statements

      “I Can…”

      • I can visualize supporting details in an informational text to create a landscape artwork.

      • I can annotate an informational text to identify the most important details.

      • I can synthesize the information presented in two different texts.

      Essential Questions

      • How can I visualize supporting details in an informational text to create a landscape artwork?

      • How can I identify the most important details using annotation?

      • How can I synthesize the information presented in two different texts?

       

      Georgia Standards

      Curriculum Standards

      Grade 6

      ELA

      ELAGSE6RI1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

      ELAGSE6RI2 Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.

       

      SOCIAL STUDIES

      SS6G1 Locate selected features of Latin America.

      SS6G4 Locate selected features of Canada.

      SS6G7 Locate selected features of Europe.

      SS6G11 Locate selected features of Australia.

       

      Grade 7

      ELA

      ELAGSE7RI1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

      ELAGSE7W8 Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. 

       

      SOCIAL STUDIES

      SS7G1 Locate selected features of Africa.

      SS7G5 Locate selected features in Southwest Asia (Middle East).

      SS7G9 Locate selected features in Southern and Eastern Asia.

       

      Grade 8

      ELAGSE8RI1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

      ELAGSE8RI2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text.

       

      SOCIAL STUDIES

      SS8G1 Describe Georgia’s geography and climate.

      Arts Standards

      Grade 6

      VA6.CR.1 Visualize and generate ideas for creating works of art. 

      VA6.CR.2 Choose from a range of materials and/or methods of traditional and contemporary artistic practices to plan and create works of art.

      VA6.CR.3 Engage in an array of processes, media, techniques, and/or technology through experimentation, practice, and persistence.

       

      Grade 7

      VA7.CR.1 Visualize and generate ideas for creating works of art. 

      VA7.CR.2 Choose from a range of materials and/or methods of traditional and contemporary artistic practices to plan and create works of art.

      VA7.CR.3 Engage in an array of processes, media, techniques, and/or technology through experimentation, practice, and persistence. 

       

      Grade 8

      VA8.CR.1 Visualize and generate ideas for creating works of art. 

      VA8.CR.2 Choose from a range of materials and/or methods of traditional and contemporary artistic practices to plan and create works of art.

      VA8.CR.3 Engage in an array of processes, media, techniques, and/or technology through experimentation, practice, and persistence.

       

       

      South Carolina Standards

      Curriculum Standards

      Grade 6

      ELA

      Reading - Informational Text (RI) - Meaning and Context 

      Standard 6: Summarize key details and ideas to support analysis of central ideas.

      6.1 Provide an objective summary of a text with two or more central ideas; cite key supporting details.

       

      Grade 7

      ELA

      Reading - Informational Text (RI) - Meaning and Context 

      Standard 6: Summarize key details and ideas to support analysis of central ideas.

      6.1 Provide an objective summary of a text with two or more central ideas; cite key supporting details to analyze their development. 

       

      SOCIAL STUDIES

      7.1.1.PR Identify select African physical systems and human characteristics of places.

      7.2.1.PR Identify select Asian physical systems and human characteristics of places.

      7.3.1.PR Identify select Australia, Oceania, and Antarctica physical systems and human characteristics of places.

      7.4.1.PR Identify select European physical systems and human characteristics of places.

      7.5.1.PR Identify select North American physical systems and human characteristics of places.

      7.6.1.PR Identify select South American physical systems (e.g., landforms and bodies of water), and human characteristics of places (e.g., countries and cities).

       

      Grade 8

      ELA

      Reading - Informational Text (RI) - Meaning and Context 

      Standard 6: Summarize key details and ideas to support analysis of central ideas.

      6.1 Provide an objective summary of a text with two or more central ideas; cite key supporting details to analyze their development.

       

      Arts Standards

      Anchor Standard 1: I can use the elements and principles of art to create artwork.

      Anchor Standard 2: I can use different materials, techniques, and processes to make art.

      Anchor Standard 5: I can interpret (read) and evaluate the meaning of an artwork.

      Anchor Standard 7: I can relate visual arts ideas to other arts disciplines, content areas, and careers.

       

      Key Vocabulary

      Content Vocabulary

      • Informational text - Nonfiction writing that has the purpose of informing the reader
      • Synthesize - To combine two or more sources of information into one coherent source of information
      • Annotate - To take notes on a text
      • Physical feature - A landform such as a mountain, river, desert, etc.
      • Text evidence - Information that comes directly from the text that supports the main idea of the text

      Arts Vocabulary

      • Space - One of the seven Elements of Art; techniques artists use to create the illusion of depth on a 2D surface
      • Landscape - A type of art that shows a wide expanse of land–usually a countryside–and shows depth through a background, middle ground, and foreground
      • Foreground - The part of a landscape that is closest to the viewer
      • Background - The part of a landscape that is farthest from the viewer
      • Middle ground - The part of a landscape that is in between the background and the foreground
      • Texture - One of the seven elements of art; how something feels or looks like it feels
      • Printmaking - Printmaking is a process by which the artist creates an image that has texture and transfers that image repeatedly onto another surface like paper.
      • Collagraph printmaking - A form of printmaking in which texture is built up on a surface by layering materials. The artist then transfers the image through a process like a rubbing onto another surface like paper.

       

      Materials

        • Computer paper
        • Cardstock
        • Cardboard or additional cardstock for background
        • Scissors
        • Glue sticks
        • Pencils
        • Crayons or oil pastels (teacher tip: soak oil pastels or crayons in warm soapy water overnight; paper labels will easily come off the next day)
        • Informational text that describes a geographic location students are studying in Social Studies such as the Sahara Desert (7th grade SS, GA)
        • Optional - colored pencils

         

         

        Instructional Design

        Opening/Activating Strategy

        • Project a landscape painting such as Landscape from Saint Remy by Vincent Van Gogh
          • First, students will identify what they see in the image. Emphasize that they should make objective observations about the painting (i.e. physical features, colors, textures, etc.). 
          • Next, ask students to identify what they think about the image. Emphasize that students should be creating inferences using visual evidence from the painting. 
          • Finally, ask students what they wonder about the image. 
          • Ask students to work collaboratively to engage in the See, Think, Wonder protocol (Harvard University Project Zero - Artful Thinking Strategies). 
          • Facilitate a class-wide discussion around students’ observations, inferences, and questions.

         

        Work Session

          • Explain that the artwork students are looking at is an example of a landscape painting. Landscape paintings show a wide expanse of land–usually a countryside–and show depth through a background, middle ground, and foreground. 
          • Show students the diagram of a landscape. Explain that the background is what is farthest away from the viewer, the foreground is directly in front of the viewer, and the middle ground everything in the middle. 
          • Ask students to try to identify the background, middle ground, and foreground in Landscape from Saint Remy by Vincent Van Gogh.
          • Explain to students that texture in art is how something feels or looks like it feels. Ask students to identify textures in the landscape painting.
          • Tell students that they will be creating their own landscape artwork based off of an informational text. Provide each student with a copy of the informational text that connects to a region students are studying in Social Studies (if applicable). 
          • With partners, have students annotate the text as they read, looking for details that describe how the region looks such as landforms, colors, etc. 
          • Facilitate a discussion with students around what details they might include in the background, what details they might include in the middle ground, and what details they might include in the foreground. 
          • Instruct students to locate and research an additional informational text on the same region. 
            • Students should use their knowledge of research practices to identify a reliable source. Students should annotate the text as they did previously. 
            • Students will synthesize the details that they found in the two sources to create their landscape artwork. 
          • Introduce students to the term Collagraph Printmaking. 
            • Printmaking is a process by which the artist creates an image that has texture and transfers that image repeatedly onto another surface like paper. 
            • Tell students that the printing press is an early example of printmaking. 
          • Explain the process of creating their artwork. 
            • Students will draw a rough draft of their landscape on blank paper using evidence from both texts. Students’ rough drafts should have a background, middle ground, and foreground.
            • Out of cardstock, students will cut out landforms like mountains and physical features like forests that they included in their rough draft. 
              • Students should glue the landforms down to a piece of cardstock or cardboard starting with the background and moving to the foreground. 
              • Students should use overlapping as they glue each layer down.
            • Once they have created their landscapes, students will create a rubbing by placing a piece of computer paper over their landscape. Using a crayon or oil pastel, they will rub across the surface to pick up the texture of the landscape.
          • Students can then add in details and additional texture using colored pencil, crayon, or oil pastel.

           

          Closing Reflection

          • Students will write a one paragraph artist statement about their work. They should include a relevant title for their landscape and what they showed in their artwork citing text evidence from both sources.
          • Allow students to conduct a gallery walk within small groups to compare and contrast how they and their classmates visualized the text. Emphasize that students should look for similarities and differences in artwork and how that reflects the sources that students used.

          Assessments

          Formative

          Teachers will assess learning by determining whether students are able to identify the background, middle ground, and foreground in the example landscape and whether students can identify all the important supporting details from both texts that describe how the region looks.

           

           

          Summative

          CHECKLIST

          • Students’ landscapes included a background, middle ground, and foreground. 
          • Students’ landscapes visualize the details from both texts that describe how the location looks.
          • Students’ artist statements include a relevant title for their landscapes and what they showed in their artwork citing text evidence from both sources.

           

           

          Differentiation

          Acceleration: 

          • Allow students to research the landscape paintings of Vincent Van Gogh or another landscape artist. Students can create their artwork in the style of Van Gogh (Post-Impressionism) or another artist of their choice. 

          Remediation: 

          • Allow students to work with partners to create their landscapes. Each partner can create their own rubbing. 
          • Provide students with an “answer key” of the passage to use to check their annotations. 
          • Have students only use one text rather than two.
          • Provide students with a graphic organizer to fill out with landforms, physical features, and agriculture as they read the text. 

           

           ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

           

          *This integrated lesson provides differentiated ideas and activities for educators that are aligned to a sampling of standards. Standards referenced at the time of publishing may differ based on each state’s adoption of new standards.

          Ideas contributed by:  Katy Betts 

          Revised and copyright:  2023  @ ArtsNOW

           

          MOSAICS AND MATH 3-5

          MOSAICS AND MATH

          MOSAICS AND MATH

          Learning Description

          In this lesson, students will use multiplication and division to create a mosaic using a watercolor crayon resist.

           

          Learning Targets

          GRADE BAND: 3-5
          CONTENT FOCUS: VISUAL ARTS & MATH
          LESSON DOWNLOADS:

          Download PDF of this Lesson

          "I Can" Statements

          “I Can…”

          • I can use multiplication and division to create a mosaic.

          • I can use crayon and watercolor to create a crayon watercolor resist painting.

          • I can create an array using a ruler and pencil.

          • I can determine factors of 54.

          Essential Questions

          • How can you utilize multiplication and division to create a mosaic?

          • How can you use an array to determine factors of 54?

           

          Georgia Standards

          Curriculum Standards

          Math

          Grade 3: 3.GSR.7: Identify area as a measurable attribute of rectangles and determine the area of a rectangle presented in real-life, mathematical problems. 

          3.GSR.8: Determine the perimeter of a polygon presented in real-life, mathematical problems.

          3.PAR.3: Use part-whole strategies to solve real-life, mathematical problems involving multiplication and division with whole numbers within 100.

          Grade 4

          4.PAR.3: Generate and analyze patterns, including those involving shapes, input/output diagrams, factors, multiples, prime numbers, and composite numbers.

          4.GSR.8: Identify and draw geometric objects, classify polygons based on properties, and solve problems involving area and perimeter of rectangular figures.

           

          Grade 55.NR.2: Multiply and divide multi-digit whole numbers to solve relevant, mathematical problems. 

          Science Grade 4:S4E3. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to demonstrate the water cycle.a.Plan and carry out investigations to observe the flow of energy in water as it changes states from solid (ice) to liquid (water) to gas (water vapor) and changes from gas to liquid to solid.b.Develop models to illustrate multiple pathways water may take during the water cycle (evaporation, condensation, and precipitation).

          Grade 5: S5P1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to explain the differences between a physical change and a chemical change.a.Plan and carry out investigations of physical changes by manipulating, separating and mixing dry and liquid materials.

           

           

          Arts Standards

          Grade 3: 

          VA3.CR.1 Engage in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas by using subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning.

          VA3.CR.2 Create works of art based on selected themes. 

          VA3.CR.3 Understand and apply media, techniques, processes, and concepts of two dimensional art. 

          VA3.RE.1 Use a variety of approaches for art criticism and to critique personal works of art and the artwork of others to enhance visual literacy.

          Grade 4: 

          VA4.CR.1 Engage in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas by using subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning.

          VA4.CR.2 Create works of art based on selected themes. 

          VA4.CR.3 Understand and apply media, techniques, processes, and concepts of two dimensional art. 

          VA4.CN.3 Develop life skills through the study and production of art (e.g. collaboration, creativity, critical thinking, communication).

          Grade 5: 

          VA5.CR.1 Engage in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas by using subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning.

          VA5.CR.2 Create works of art based on selected themes. 

          VA5.CR.3 Understand and apply media, techniques, processes, and concepts of two dimensional art.

          VA5.CN.3 Develop life skills through the study and production of art (e.g. collaboration, creativity, critical thinking, communication).

           

           

          South Carolina Standards

          Curriculum Standards

          3rd Grade

          3.ATO.1 Use concrete objects, drawings and symbols to represent multiplication facts of two single-digit whole numbers and explain the relationship between the factors (i.e., 0 – 10) and the product. 

          3.ATO.2 Use concrete objects, drawings and symbols to represent division without remainders and explain the relationship among the whole number quotient (i.e., 0 – 10), divisor (i.e., 0 – 10), and dividend. 

          3.ATO.3 Solve real-world problems involving equal groups, area/array, and number line models using basic multiplication and related division facts. Represent the problem situation using an equation with a symbol for the unknown

           

          4th Grade

          4.ATO.1 Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison (e.g. interpret 35 = 5x7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5.) Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations. 

          4.ATO.2 Solve real-world problems using multiplication (product unknown) and division (group size unknown, number of groups unknown).

           

           

          Arts Standards

          Anchor Standard 1: I can use the elements and principles of art to create artwork.

          Anchor Standard 2: I can use different materials, techniques, and processes to make art.

          Anchor Standard 5: I can interpret (read) and evaluate the meaning of an artwork.

          Anchor Standard 7: I can relate visual arts ideas to other arts disciplines, content areas, and careers.

           

           

           

           

           

          Key Vocabulary

          Content Vocabulary

          • Array - A way of arranging objects or images in rows and columns
          • Multiplication - Repeated addition of numbers of the same size
          • Division - Repeated subtraction of numbers of the same size
          • Factor - A number that can be used to evenly divide into another number

          Arts Vocabulary

          • 7 Elements of Art - Line, shape, form, texture, color, value, space
          • Line - One of the seven Elements of Art; it is a mark made by a pointed tool such as a brush, pen or stick; a moving point.
          • Shape - One of the seven Elements of Art; it is a flat, enclosed area that has two dimensions, length and width. Artists use both geometric and organic shapes.
          • Space - How the Elements of Art are organized in an artwork. It is used to create the illusion of depth. Space can be two-dimensional, three-dimensional, negative and/or positive.
          • Watercolor wash - A layer of watercolor that completely covers a surface and is translucent
          • Variegated watercolor wash - A watercolor wash that transitions from one color to another color
          • Crayon watercolor resist - The process of using crayon or oil pastel (oil based) to draw on a surface and then covering it with a watercolor wash.
          • Mosaic - An artform that is a picture or pattern produced by arranging together small colored pieces of hard material, such as stone, tile, or glass. (Oxford Languages)
          • Composition - The way the Elements of Art are arranged in an artwork
          • Warm colors - Red, orange, yellow
          • Cool colors - Green, blue, violet
          • Analogous colors - Colors next to each other on the color wheel (Example: red, orange, yellow)
          • Complementary colors - Colors across from each other on the color wheel (Example: Orange and blue)
          • Contrast - An arrangement of opposite elements in a composition to create visual interest

           

           

          Materials

            • 12x18-inch black construction paper
            • 9x6-inch white mixed-media paper
            • Crayons or oil pastels in warm and cool colors
            • Watercolor set
            • Paintbrushes
            • Water cups with water
            • Ruler
            • Pencil
            • Scissors
            • Glue sticks

             

             

            Instructional Design

            Opening/Activating Strategy

            • Show students an image of an ancient Roman mosaic on a board (Examples of ancient Roman mosaics).
            • Ask students to identify as many geometric shapes as they can in the image. 
            • Have students compare their findings with a partner. 
            • Then, ask students to take turns outlining the shapes on the board.
            • Explain that Shape is one of the seven elements of art that they will be using to create their own mosaic. 
            • Show students where the ancient Roman Empire was in relationship to where students live. 
            • Define for students what a mosaic is.
            • Briefly go over the 7 Elements of Art. Ask students to identify as many as they can in the image of the ancient Roman mosaic.

             

            Work Session

            • Explain that students will be focusing on Line, Shape, Space, and Color in their mosaic.
            • Demonstrate to students how to create a 6x9-in array using pencil and ruler. 

            Teacher tip: Have students mark their paper at each one inch interval around the entire paper. Then, have students connect the marks to create an array.

            • Ask students to use mathematical concepts that they have learned to determine how many 1-inch squares they have. 
            • Ask students to identify the area and perimeter using mathematical strategies.
            • Tell students that in the next step, they will be creating a watercolor-resist painting. They will draw with crayon and paint over the crayon with watercolor. The wax in the crayon will “resist” the water in the watercolor. 
            • Show students a color wheel
              • Discuss the different ways we can organize colors into color schemes: Warm, cool, complementary, and analogous (see color wheel)
              • Tell students that they will be drawing lines and shapes over the entire surface of their paper using either warm OR cool colored crayons. 
            • Tell students that next they will be painting over the entire surface of the paper in watercolor. Show students how to create a variegated watercolor wash using the video.
              • Students should create a variegated watercolor wash in warm colors if students used cool colored crayons; students should use cool colors if they used warm colored crayons. This will create contrast. 
              • Direct students to make observations about the water cycle as they watch the water in the watercolor evaporate and the paper dry. Ask students if this is a chemical or physical change.
            • Once the watercolor wash is mostly dry, students should cut out each square and divide them into equal groups using factors of 54.
            • Explain that students are going to arrange their groups (factors of 54) in a composition on their black paper. Once they have arranged them, they will glue them down.
              • Composition is how an artist arranges the elements of art, like line, shape, and color, in their artwork.

            Teacher tip: Have students place all of their pieces on their paper BEFORE beginning to glue them down.

             

            Closing Reflection

            • Have students explain to a partner how they grouped their pieces of the watercolor-resist into factors of 54 in their mosaic.
            • Ask students to explain how they determined the size of their groupings.
            • Ask students to identify which elements of art they used in their mosaic.

            Assessments

            Formative

            Teachers will assess understanding through the:

            • Shapes students identified in Roman mosaic
            • Students’ ability to group pieces of mosaic into factors of 54
            • Students’ color choices (checking for understanding of warm and cool colors)

             

            Summative

            CHECKLIST

            • Students will demonstrate what they learned by creating a watercolor crayon resist mosaic that utilizes contrasting warm and cool colors and demonstrates that they can arrange watercolor pieces in factors of 54 in a compositionally interesting way on their paper.

             

             

            Differentiation

             

            Acceleration: Instead of using 1x1-inch squares, have students determine other ways to divide their paper into equal sections (example).

            Remediation: 

            • Rather than creating a watercolor resist, have students use construction paper in contrasting colors to create their mosaic. 
            • Students can also fold paper into equal sections instead of using a ruler to measure equal sections before cutting.
            • Provide an array for students rather than having students create their own with rulers.

             

             ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

             

            *This integrated lesson provides differentiated ideas and activities for educators that are aligned to a sampling of standards. Standards referenced at the time of publishing may differ based on each state’s adoption of new standards.

            Ideas contributed by:  Katy Betts

            Revised and copyright:  2024 @ ArtsNOW

             

            Storytelling through Mosaics 4-5

            STORYTELLING THROUGH MOSAICS

            STORYTELLING THROUGH MOSAICS

            Learning Description

            In this lesson, students will use literacy strategies to interpret works of art and to create a mosaic using watercolor that illustrates a key detail from a literary passage. Students will use their finished mosaics to create a retelling of the passage.

             

            Learning Targets

            GRADE BAND: 4-5
            CONTENT FOCUS: VISUAL ARTS& ELA
            LESSON DOWNLOADS:

            Download PDF of this Lesson

            "I Can" Statements

            “I Can…”

            • I can use shape and color to create a mosaic that demonstrates a key detail of a passage.

            • I can describe the process I used to create my mosaic

            • I can draw conclusions about images and use visual evidence to support my reasoning.

            Essential Questions

            • How can I use the elements of shape and color to create a mosaic that demonstrates a key detail of a passage?

            • How can I describe the process I used to create my artwork?

            • How can I use visual evidence to explain my reasoning?

             

            Georgia Standards

            Curriculum Standards

            Grade 4:

            ELAGSE4RL1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

             

            ELAGSE4RL3 Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions).

             

            ELAGSE4RL7 Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text identifying similarities and differences.

             

            ELAGSE4RI1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 

             

            ELAGSE4SL1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 4 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

             

            Grade 5:

            ELAGSE5RI1 Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. 

             

            ELAGSE5RI2 Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text.

             

            ELAGSE5SL1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

             

            ELAGSE5SL2 Summarize a written text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

             

             

            Arts Standards

            Grade 4:

            VA4.CR.1 Engage in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas by using subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning.

             

            VA4.CR.2 Create works of art based on selected themes. 

             

            VA4.CR.3 Understand and apply media, techniques, processes, and concepts of two dimensional art. 

             

            VA4.RE.1 Use a variety of approaches for art criticism and to critique personal works of art and the artwork of others to enhance visual literacy.

             

            VA4.CN.2 Integrate information from other disciplines to enhance the understanding and production of works of art.

             

            VA4.CN.3 Develop life skills through the study and production of art (e.g. collaboration, creativity, critical thinking, communication).

             

            Grade 5:

            VA5.CR.1 Engage in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas by using subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning.

             

            VA5.CR.2 Create works of art based on selected themes. 

             

            VA5.CR.3 Understand and apply media, techniques, processes, and concepts of two dimensional art.

             

            VA5.RE.1 Use a variety of approaches for art criticism and to critique personal works of art and the artwork of others to enhance visual literacy.

             

            VA5.CN.2 Integrate information from other disciplines to enhance the understanding and production of works of art.

             

            VA5.CN.3 Develop life skills through the study and production of art (e.g. collaboration, creativity, critical thinking, communication).

             

             

             

             

            South Carolina Standards

            Curriculum Standards

            Grade 4:

            4.RL.MC.5.1 Ask and answer inferential questions to analyze meaning beyond the text; refer to details and examples within a text to support inferences and conclusions. 

             

            4.RL.MC.7.1 Explore similarities and differences among textual, dramatic, visual, or oral presentations. 

             

            4.C.MC.1.2 Participate in discussions; ask and respond to questions to acquire information concerning a topic, text, or issue.  

             

            4.C.MC.2.1 Articulate ideas, perspectives and information with details and supporting evidence in a logical sequence with a clear introduction, body, and conclusion. 

             

            4.C.MC.3.2 Create presentations using videos, photos, and other multimedia elements to support communication and clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings. 

             

            Grade 5:

            5.RL.MC.7.1 Compare and contrast textual, dramatic, visual, or oral presentations to identify similarities and differences.  

             

            5.C.MC.1.2 Participate in discussions; ask and respond to probing questions to acquire and confirm information concerning a topic, text, or issue. 

            5.C.MC.3.2 Create presentations that integrate visual displays and other multimedia to enrich the presentation. 

             

             

             

            Arts Standards

            Anchor Standard 1: I can use the elements and principles of art to create artwork.

             

            Anchor Standard 2: I can use different materials, techniques, and processes to make art.

             

            Anchor Standard 3: I can improve and complete artistic work using elements and principles.

            Anchor Standard 4: I can organize work for presentation and documentation to reflect specific content, ideas, skills, and or media.

             

             

             

             

            Key Vocabulary

            Content Vocabulary

            • Detail - Information from the passage that supports the main idea.

            • Setting - When and where a story takes place.

            • Character - A person, figure, or animal depicted in literature.

            • Summary - A brief description of a passage that captures the main idea.

             

            Arts Vocabulary

            • Shape - One of the seven Elements of Art; it is a flat, enclosed area that has two dimensions, length and width. Artists use both geometric and organic shapes.

            • Watercolor wash - A layer of watercolor that completely covers a surface and is translucent.

            • Mosaic - An art form that is a picture or pattern produced by arranging small colored pieces of hard material, such as stone, tile, or glass.

            • Composition - The way the elements of art are arranged in an artwork.

            • Warm colors - Red, orange, yellow.

            • Cool colors - Green, blue, violet.

            • Complementary colors - Colors across from each other on the color wheel (Example: Orange and blue).

            • Analogous colors - Colors next to each other on the color wheel (Example: red, orange, yellow).

             

             

            Materials

            • 9x12-inch black construction paper
            • 9x12-inch white multi-media or watercolor paper
            • Watercolor set
            • Paintbrushes (preferably flat brush)
            • Water cups with water
            • Pencil
            • Scissors
            • Liquid glue or glue sticks

             

            Instructional Design

            Opening/Activating Strategy

            Settings

            • Show students an image of an ancient Roman mosaic.
            • Ask students to go through the “See, Think, Wonder” strategy.
            • Have students compare their findings with a partner. Have groups share their findings. 
            • Students should be able to use visual evidence to support any “think” statements.
            • Explain that mosaics are made up of tiny pieces of material to create an image or design. Mosaics use the element of art, shape.

             

            Work Session

                • Explain that students will be focusing on shape, space, and color in their mosaic. Go over the different types of shapes (organic, free-form, and geometric - see link in Resources).
                • Read a descriptive passage to students such as an excerpt from the book, Tiger, Tiger by Dee Lillegard. Ask students to close their eyes as they listen to the passage and listen for details that tell about the characters and the setting.
                • Discuss the setting and the characters after reading the passage.
                • Ask students to do a “quick draw” of one of the things that stood out to them from the passage. Students’ quick draw should demonstrate a key detail from a character or setting. 
                • Students should share their quick draw with a partner and explain why they chose that detail from the passage.
                • Explain that students will be making the tiles for their mosaic out of watercolor paper. 
                • Show students a color wheel. Discuss the different ways we can organize colors into color schemes: warm, cool, complementary, and analogous.
                • Students will paint their paper the colors that they need for their mosaic.
                • Once the watercolor wash is mostly dry, students should cut out shapes for their mosaic.
                • Students should draw their “quick draw” on their black paper and then glue their shapes down onto the black paper. Tell students that it is alright if their composition changes from their quick draw to their mosaic. This is part of the design thinking process!

                 

                 

                Closing Reflection

                • Students should respond to the following prompts in written form - How did you make your artwork (procedural writing)? What details from the text did you show and why? What are you most proud of in your artwork?
                • Students should then organize themselves in the order of the story that their mosaic shows (beginning, middle, end) to retell the story.

                 

                 

                Assessments

                Formative

                • Student discussion around ancient Roman mosaic - See, Think, Wonder strategy using visual evidence to support reasoning
                • Students’ quick draw and pair share to demonstrate whether students comprehend the text

                   

                  Summative

                  • Mosaic should demonstrate students’ understanding of text.
                  • Writing responses should demonstrate that students can explain the process that they used to create their artwork.
                  • Students should be able to arrange their mosaics in the order of story to demonstrate comprehension.

                   

                  Differentiation

                   

                  Acceleration: 

                  • Read the passage until a “cliff-hanger”. Have students who have finished mosaic write and illustrate what they think will happen at the end of the story.

                  Remediation: 

                  • Point out key details in the text that students could illustrate. Facilitate discussion around why these are key details. Write the detail on the board along with an image that students could illustrate. 
                  • Instead of having students write the process they used to create their art, ask students to write a sentence stating what detail they showed from the text and why they chose that detail.

                   

                   ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

                  Color wheel

                  Examples of ancient Roman mosaics

                  Mosaics and Literacy presentation

                  *This integrated lesson provides differentiated ideas and activities for educators that are aligned to a sampling of standards. Standards referenced at the time of publishing may differ based on each state’s adoption of new standards.

                   Ideas contributed by: Katy Betts 

                  Revised and copyright:  September 2023 @ ArtsNOW

                  SNOW AND ONE “COOL” ANIMAL K-1

                  SNOW AND ONE “COOL” ANIMAL

                  SNOW AND ONE “COOL” ANIMAL

                  Learning Description

                  In this lesson, students will use what they learn about polar bears and the Elements of Art, Shape, Line, and Texture, to create an artistic representation of a polar bear.

                   

                  Learning Targets

                  GRADE BAND: K-1
                  CONTENT FOCUS: VISUAL ARTS, SCIENCE & ELA
                  LESSON DOWNLOADS:

                  Download PDF of this Lesson

                  "I Can" Statements

                  “I Can…”

                  • I can use what I learned about polar bears to create an artistic representation of a polar bear using the Elements of Art, Line, Shape, and Texture.

                  Essential Questions

                  • How can I use what I learned about polar bears to create an artistic representation using the Elements of Art, Line, Shape, and Texture?

                   

                  Georgia Standards

                  Curriculum Standards

                  Kindergarten

                  ELA

                  ELAGSEKRL10 Actively engage in group reading activities with purpose and understanding.

                  ELAGSEKRI1 With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

                  Science

                  SKL1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about how organisms (alive and not alive) and non-living objects are grouped.

                   

                  Grade 1

                  ELA

                  ELAGSE1RI1 Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

                  ELAGSE1RI2 Identify the main topic and retell key details of a text.

                  Science

                  S1L1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about the basic needs of plants and animals.

                   

                   

                  Arts Standards

                  Kindergarten

                  VAK.CR.1 Engage in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas by using subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning.

                  VAK.CR.2 Create works of art based on selected themes.

                  VAK.CR.3 Understand and apply media, techniques, and processes of two-dimensional art.

                  VAK.CN.2 Integrate information from other disciplines to enhance the understanding and production of works of art. 

                   

                  Grade 1

                  VA1.CR.1 Engage in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas by using subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning.

                  VA1.CR.2 Create works of art based on selected themes. 

                  VA1.CR.3 Understand and apply media, techniques, and processes of two-dimensional art.

                  VA1.CN.2 Integrate information from other disciplines to enhance the understanding and production of works of art.

                   

                   

                   

                   

                  South Carolina Standards

                  Curriculum Standards

                  Kindergarten

                  ELA

                  INQUIRY-BASED LITERARY STANDARDS 

                  Standard 2: Transact with texts to formulate questions, propose explanations, and consider alternative views and multiple perspectives.

                  2.1 With guidance and support, engage in daily explorations of texts to make connections to personal experiences, other texts, or the environment.

                   

                  RANGE AND COMPLEXITY 

                  Standard 13: Read independently and comprehend a variety of texts for the purposes of reading for enjoyment, acquiring new learning, and building stamina; reflect and respond to increasingly complex text over time.

                  13.1 Engage in whole and small group reading with purpose and understanding.

                   

                  Science

                  K-ESS2-2. Construct an argument supported by evidence for how plants and animals (including humans) can change the environment to meet their needs.

                   

                  Grade 1

                  INQUIRY-BASED LITERARY STANDARDS 

                  Standard 2: Transact with texts to formulate questions, propose explanations, and consider alternative views and multiple perspectives.

                  2.1 Engage in daily explorations of texts to make connections to personal experiences, other texts, or the environment.

                   

                  RANGE AND COMPLEXITY 

                  Standard 13: Read independently and comprehend a variety of texts for the purposes of reading for enjoyment, acquiring new learning, and building stamina; reflect and respond to increasingly complex text over time.

                  13.1 Engage in whole and small group reading with purpose and understanding.

                   

                  Science

                  1-LS1-2. Obtain information from multiple sources to determine patterns in parent and offspring behavior that help offspring survive.

                   

                   

                  Arts Standards

                  Artistic Processes: Creating- I can make artwork using a variety of materials, techniques, and processes.

                  Anchor Standard 1: I can use the elements and principles of art to create artwork.

                  Anchor Standard 2: I can use different materials, techniques, and processes to make art.

                   

                  Artistic Processes: Responding- I can evaluate and communicate about the meaning in my artwork and the artwork of others.

                  Anchor Standard 5: I can interpret (read) and evaluate the meaning of an artwork.

                   

                  Artistic Processes: Connecting- I can relate artistic ideas and work with personal meaning and external context.

                  Anchor Standard 7: I can relate visual arts ideas to other arts disciplines, content areas, and careers.

                   

                   

                   

                  Key Vocabulary

                  Content Vocabulary

                  • Arctic – The northernmost region of the Earth
                  • Aquatic – Water
                  • Mammal – Animals that have fur, drink their mother’s milk, and are warm-blooded
                  • Shore – The land by the edge of the water
                  • Seals – Web-footed aquatic mammals that live chiefly in cold seas and whose body shape, round at the middle and tapered at the ends, is adapted to swift and graceful swimming

                   

                  Arts Vocabulary

                  • Line – A short or long narrow mark
                  • Texture – The way something feels or looks like it feels (soft, fuzzy, rough, etc.)
                  • Shape – A two-dimensional or flat object. In art, it can be organic or geometric.

                   

                   

                  Materials

                  • Blue paper plates for each student
                  • Construction cut outs of ears and mouth
                  • 1 set of googly eyes per student
                  • Clothespin paintbrush (clothespin with cotton ball on top)
                  • White paint
                  • Plastic fork for each student
                  • Plastic cup for fake snow
                  • Fake snow: 
                  • Wet wipes to clean hands

                   

                  Instructional Design

                  Opening/Activating Strategy

                  • Show pictures of snowflakes floating. Ask students what they notice about the snowflakes. Direct students towards noticing shapes and lines. Ask students how they imagine they might feel (warm, cold) and what they might smell. 
                  • Tell the students they will be learning about using art materials such as white paint and fake snow to create their own “cool” animal, the Polar Bear.

                   

                  Work Session

                  • Show students where they live on a globe or map for reference. Next, show students where the Arctic is located. Ask students what they think it would feel like to be in this place. What colors would they see? What textures would they feel? Would it be warm or cool?
                  • Read an informational book such as Polar Bear (Read and Learn: A Day in the Life: Polar Animals) by Katie Marsico. Ask students to connect the information in the book to the photos. Ask students to identify how the photos explain the text.
                  • Show the students an image of a polar bear and define mammals, arctic, aquatic, and shore. Briefly identify each word so they are familiar with the vocabulary. 
                  • As a whole group, go over what polar bears do, how the different parts of their bodies help them survive, and where they live. Show students photos and briefly provide information.
                  • Ask students to identify characteristics of the polar bear such as color, size in relation to other animals, and texture.
                    • Explain that next, they will use their art materials to create their own polar bear. 
                    • Tell students that artists use color, size, and texture to express their ideas in their art.
                  • Show the exemplar of the polar bear art. Ask students to describe the texture, lines, and shapes that they see that make the artwork. 
                  • Demonstrate how to make fake snow (see “materials”). 
                    • Help students notice what happens when baking soda is mixed with conditioner. 
                    • Put some of the fake snow in their plastic cups for them to touch and feel. 
                    • Ask them to describe the texture. 
                    • (Teacher note: Remind them that the snow is not real, and we never put anything in our mouths.)
                  • Go over the directions of how to make the polar bear using a fork to create texture.
                    • Place about a tablespoon of white acrylic paint on a paper plate. 
                    • Pass out the following materials to each student: plastic fork, blue paper plate (navy works best), two pre-cut/pre-glued shapes for ears and nose/mouth, one set of “googly” eyes. (Give students the choice of what eyes they want to use to personalize their polar bear.)
                    • When they have all their materials, explain to students that they will start creating the element of art, texture, by dipping the fork in the white paint and pressing down in the center of the navy-blue plate. When you see their forks in the center, explain that they have to gently press and pull to create the texture look of a polar bear’s fur. They can re-dip when necessary.
                    • Explain to the students to keep pressing and pulling until their blue plate is filled up. This will represent the face of the polar bear. 
                    • When the students have finished the painting, have them take their nose/mouth and ears and place them where they think a nose/mouth and ears would be on a polar bear. 
                    • After the teacher has checked, give students a glue stick to glue the nose/mouth and ears down. 
                    • Tell students that next they will “glue” on their googly eyes. Explain that the wet paint will serve as glue for holding down the eyes, nose/mouth.

                   

                  Closing Reflection

                  • Have each student create and write a name for their polar bear. Remind students that proper nouns start with a capital letter.
                  • Allow students to verbally introduce their polar bears to their classmates. Have the students say, “Hi, my polar bear’s name is….” The other students will say,

                  “Hi, (name of polar bear)”. This reinforces their speaking/communication skills.

                   

                  Assessments

                  Formative

                  Observation of:

                  • Collaboration
                  • Communication
                  • Creativity
                  • CompletioN

                     

                    Summative

                    CHECKLIST

                    • Students can explain what polar bears do, how the different parts of their bodies help them survive in the Arctic, and where they live. 
                    • Students can use texture, line, and shape to create a polar bear.

                     

                     

                     

                    Differentiation

                    Acceleration: 

                    • Students can use their completed polar bear to write their bear’s name and a complete sentence about their polar bear.

                    Remediation: 

                    • The teacher should work with identified children to assist with painting.
                    • Allow students to work in pairs; pair students who are higher achieving with students who may struggle.

                     

                     ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

                    • Optional: An informational text such as Polar Bear (Read and Learn: A Day in the Life: Polar Animals) by Katie Marsico

                     

                    *This integrated lesson provides differentiated ideas and activities for educators that are aligned to a sampling of standards. Standards referenced at the time of publishing may differ based on each state’s adoption of new standards.

                    Ideas contributed by:  Kim Spivey 

                    Revised and copyright:  2024 @ ArtsNOW