UNDERSTANDING INFORMATIONAL TEXT THROUGH LANDSCAPE ART 6-8

UNDERSTANDING INFORMATIONAL TEXT
THROUGH LANDSCAPE ART

MOSAICS AND MATH

Learning Description

In this lesson, students will demonstrate their understanding of informational texts by using text evidence to create a landscape artwork.

 

Learning Targets

GRADE BAND: 6-8
CONTENT FOCUS: VISUAL ARTS, ELA, SOCIAL STUDIES
LESSON DOWNLOADS:

Download PDF of this Lesson

"I Can" Statements

“I Can…”

  • I can visualize supporting details in an informational text to create a landscape artwork.

  • I can annotate an informational text to identify the most important details.

  • I can synthesize the information presented in two different texts.

Essential Questions

  • How can I visualize supporting details in an informational text to create a landscape artwork?

  • How can I identify the most important details using annotation?

  • How can I synthesize the information presented in two different texts?

 

Georgia Standards

Curriculum Standards

Grade 6

ELA

ELAGSE6RI1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. 

ELAGSE6RI2 Determine a central idea of a text and how it is conveyed through particular details; provide a summary of the text distinct from personal opinions or judgments.

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

SS6G1 Locate selected features of Latin America.

SS6G4 Locate selected features of Canada.

SS6G7 Locate selected features of Europe.

SS6G11 Locate selected features of Australia.

 

Grade 7

ELA

ELAGSE7RI1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

ELAGSE7W8 Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, using search terms effectively; assess the credibility and accuracy of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation. 

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

SS7G1 Locate selected features of Africa.

SS7G5 Locate selected features in Southwest Asia (Middle East).

SS7G9 Locate selected features in Southern and Eastern Asia.

 

Grade 8

ELAGSE8RI1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

ELAGSE8RI2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text.

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

SS8G1 Describe Georgia’s geography and climate.

Arts Standards

Grade 6

VA6.CR.1 Visualize and generate ideas for creating works of art. 

VA6.CR.2 Choose from a range of materials and/or methods of traditional and contemporary artistic practices to plan and create works of art.

VA6.CR.3 Engage in an array of processes, media, techniques, and/or technology through experimentation, practice, and persistence.

 

Grade 7

VA7.CR.1 Visualize and generate ideas for creating works of art. 

VA7.CR.2 Choose from a range of materials and/or methods of traditional and contemporary artistic practices to plan and create works of art.

VA7.CR.3 Engage in an array of processes, media, techniques, and/or technology through experimentation, practice, and persistence. 

 

Grade 8

VA8.CR.1 Visualize and generate ideas for creating works of art. 

VA8.CR.2 Choose from a range of materials and/or methods of traditional and contemporary artistic practices to plan and create works of art.

VA8.CR.3 Engage in an array of processes, media, techniques, and/or technology through experimentation, practice, and persistence.

 

 

South Carolina Standards

Curriculum Standards

Grade 6

ELA

Reading - Informational Text (RI) - Meaning and Context 

Standard 6: Summarize key details and ideas to support analysis of central ideas.

6.1 Provide an objective summary of a text with two or more central ideas; cite key supporting details.

 

Grade 7

ELA

Reading - Informational Text (RI) - Meaning and Context 

Standard 6: Summarize key details and ideas to support analysis of central ideas.

6.1 Provide an objective summary of a text with two or more central ideas; cite key supporting details to analyze their development. 

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

7.1.1.PR Identify select African physical systems and human characteristics of places.

7.2.1.PR Identify select Asian physical systems and human characteristics of places.

7.3.1.PR Identify select Australia, Oceania, and Antarctica physical systems and human characteristics of places.

7.4.1.PR Identify select European physical systems and human characteristics of places.

7.5.1.PR Identify select North American physical systems and human characteristics of places.

7.6.1.PR Identify select South American physical systems (e.g., landforms and bodies of water), and human characteristics of places (e.g., countries and cities).

 

Grade 8

ELA

Reading - Informational Text (RI) - Meaning and Context 

Standard 6: Summarize key details and ideas to support analysis of central ideas.

6.1 Provide an objective summary of a text with two or more central ideas; cite key supporting details to analyze their development.

 

Arts Standards

Anchor Standard 1: I can use the elements and principles of art to create artwork.

Anchor Standard 2: I can use different materials, techniques, and processes to make art.

Anchor Standard 5: I can interpret (read) and evaluate the meaning of an artwork.

Anchor Standard 7: I can relate visual arts ideas to other arts disciplines, content areas, and careers.

 

Key Vocabulary

Content Vocabulary

  • Informational text - Nonfiction writing that has the purpose of informing the reader
  • Synthesize - To combine two or more sources of information into one coherent source of information
  • Annotate - To take notes on a text
  • Physical feature - A landform such as a mountain, river, desert, etc.
  • Text evidence - Information that comes directly from the text that supports the main idea of the text

Arts Vocabulary

  • Space - One of the seven Elements of Art; techniques artists use to create the illusion of depth on a 2D surface
  • Landscape - A type of art that shows a wide expanse of land–usually a countryside–and shows depth through a background, middle ground, and foreground
  • Foreground - The part of a landscape that is closest to the viewer
  • Background - The part of a landscape that is farthest from the viewer
  • Middle ground - The part of a landscape that is in between the background and the foreground
  • Texture - One of the seven elements of art; how something feels or looks like it feels
  • Printmaking - Printmaking is a process by which the artist creates an image that has texture and transfers that image repeatedly onto another surface like paper.
  • Collagraph printmaking - A form of printmaking in which texture is built up on a surface by layering materials. The artist then transfers the image through a process like a rubbing onto another surface like paper.

 

Materials

    • Computer paper
    • Cardstock
    • Cardboard or additional cardstock for background
    • Scissors
    • Glue sticks
    • Pencils
    • Crayons or oil pastels (teacher tip: soak oil pastels or crayons in warm soapy water overnight; paper labels will easily come off the next day)
    • Informational text that describes a geographic location students are studying in Social Studies such as the Sahara Desert (7th grade SS, GA)
    • Optional - colored pencils

     

     

    Instructional Design

    Opening/Activating Strategy

    • Project a landscape painting such as Landscape from Saint Remy by Vincent Van Gogh
      • First, students will identify what they see in the image. Emphasize that they should make objective observations about the painting (i.e. physical features, colors, textures, etc.). 
      • Next, ask students to identify what they think about the image. Emphasize that students should be creating inferences using visual evidence from the painting. 
      • Finally, ask students what they wonder about the image. 
      • Ask students to work collaboratively to engage in the See, Think, Wonder protocol (Harvard University Project Zero - Artful Thinking Strategies). 
      • Facilitate a class-wide discussion around students’ observations, inferences, and questions.

     

    Work Session

      • Explain that the artwork students are looking at is an example of a landscape painting. Landscape paintings show a wide expanse of land–usually a countryside–and show depth through a background, middle ground, and foreground. 
      • Show students the diagram of a landscape. Explain that the background is what is farthest away from the viewer, the foreground is directly in front of the viewer, and the middle ground everything in the middle. 
      • Ask students to try to identify the background, middle ground, and foreground in Landscape from Saint Remy by Vincent Van Gogh.
      • Explain to students that texture in art is how something feels or looks like it feels. Ask students to identify textures in the landscape painting.
      • Tell students that they will be creating their own landscape artwork based off of an informational text. Provide each student with a copy of the informational text that connects to a region students are studying in Social Studies (if applicable). 
      • With partners, have students annotate the text as they read, looking for details that describe how the region looks such as landforms, colors, etc. 
      • Facilitate a discussion with students around what details they might include in the background, what details they might include in the middle ground, and what details they might include in the foreground. 
      • Instruct students to locate and research an additional informational text on the same region. 
        • Students should use their knowledge of research practices to identify a reliable source. Students should annotate the text as they did previously. 
        • Students will synthesize the details that they found in the two sources to create their landscape artwork. 
      • Introduce students to the term Collagraph Printmaking. 
        • Printmaking is a process by which the artist creates an image that has texture and transfers that image repeatedly onto another surface like paper. 
        • Tell students that the printing press is an early example of printmaking. 
      • Explain the process of creating their artwork. 
        • Students will draw a rough draft of their landscape on blank paper using evidence from both texts. Students’ rough drafts should have a background, middle ground, and foreground.
        • Out of cardstock, students will cut out landforms like mountains and physical features like forests that they included in their rough draft. 
          • Students should glue the landforms down to a piece of cardstock or cardboard starting with the background and moving to the foreground. 
          • Students should use overlapping as they glue each layer down.
        • Once they have created their landscapes, students will create a rubbing by placing a piece of computer paper over their landscape. Using a crayon or oil pastel, they will rub across the surface to pick up the texture of the landscape.
      • Students can then add in details and additional texture using colored pencil, crayon, or oil pastel.

       

      Closing Reflection

      • Students will write a one paragraph artist statement about their work. They should include a relevant title for their landscape and what they showed in their artwork citing text evidence from both sources.
      • Allow students to conduct a gallery walk within small groups to compare and contrast how they and their classmates visualized the text. Emphasize that students should look for similarities and differences in artwork and how that reflects the sources that students used.

      Assessments

      Formative

      Teachers will assess learning by determining whether students are able to identify the background, middle ground, and foreground in the example landscape and whether students can identify all the important supporting details from both texts that describe how the region looks.

       

       

      Summative

      CHECKLIST

      • Students’ landscapes included a background, middle ground, and foreground. 
      • Students’ landscapes visualize the details from both texts that describe how the location looks.
      • Students’ artist statements include a relevant title for their landscapes and what they showed in their artwork citing text evidence from both sources.

       

       

      Differentiation

      Acceleration: 

      • Allow students to research the landscape paintings of Vincent Van Gogh or another landscape artist. Students can create their artwork in the style of Van Gogh (Post-Impressionism) or another artist of their choice. 

      Remediation: 

      • Allow students to work with partners to create their landscapes. Each partner can create their own rubbing. 
      • Provide students with an “answer key” of the passage to use to check their annotations. 
      • Have students only use one text rather than two.
      • Provide students with a graphic organizer to fill out with landforms, physical features, and agriculture as they read the text. 

       

       ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

       

      *This integrated lesson provides differentiated ideas and activities for educators that are aligned to a sampling of standards. Standards referenced at the time of publishing may differ based on each state’s adoption of new standards.

      Ideas contributed by:  Katy Betts 

      Revised and copyright:  2023  @ ArtsNOW

       

      DANCING THROUGH SENTENCE STRUCTURE 2-3

      DANCING THROUGH SENTENCE STRUCTURE

      DANCING THROUGH SENTENCE STRUCTURE

      Learning Description

      This lesson allows students to explore sentence structure through movement and choreographicsequences. Discover how to integrate dance into your language arts curriculum and engage yourstudents in a brand-new way!

       

      Learning Targets

      GRADE BAND: 2-3
      CONTENT FOCUS: DANCE & ELA
      LESSON DOWNLOADS:

      Download PDF of this Lesson

      "I Can" Statements

      “I Can…”

      • I can identify types of sentences.
      • I can identify parts of speech.
      • I can use movement to express the intent of a sentence, i.e., strong emotion, a question, or a command.
      • I can choreograph a dance based on a given structure.

      Essential Questions

      • How can movement help us identify parts of speech and sentence type? 

       

      Georgia Standards

      Curriculum Standards

      Grade 2: 

      ELAGSE2L1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English 

      grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

       

      ELAGSE2L2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English 

      capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

       

      Grade 3: 

      ELAGSE3L1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English 

      grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

       

      ELAGSE3L2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English 

      capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

       

      Arts Standards

      Grade 2:

      ESD2.CR.1 Demonstrate an understanding of the choreographic process.

      ESD2.CR.2 Demonstrate an understanding of dance as a form of communication.

      ESD2.PR.1 Identify and demonstrate movement elements, skills, and terminology in dance.

      ESD2.RE.1 Demonstrate critical and creative thinking in dance.

      ESD2.CN.3 Identify connections between dance and other areas of knowledge.

       

      Grade 3:

      ESD3.CR.1 Demonstrate an understanding of the choreographic process.

      ESD3.CR.2 Demonstrate an understanding of dance as a form of communication.

      ESD3.PR.1 Identify and demonstrate movement elements, skills, technique, and terminology in dance

      ESD3.RE.1 Demonstrate critical and creative thinking in dance.

      ESD3.CN.3 Identify connections between dance and other areas of knowledge.

       

       

      South Carolina Standards

      Curriculum Standards

      Grade 2:

      2.W.MCC.4.1 Use collective nouns. 

      2.W.MCC.4.4 Form and use the past tense of frequently occurring irregular verbs. 

      2.W.MCC.4.5 Use adjectives and adverbs, and choose between them depending on what is to be modified. 

      2.W.L.5.2.a Use periods, question marks, or exclamation marks at the end of sentences.

       

      Grade 3:

      3.W.MCC.4.1.a When writing show knowledge of the function of nouns, pronouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs;

       

      Arts Standards

      Grades 2-3:

      Anchor Standard 1: I can use movement exploration to discover and create artistic ideas and works.

      Anchor Standard 2: I can choreograph a dance.

      Anchor Standard 3: I can perform movements using the dance elements.

      Anchor Standard 5: I can describe, analyze, and evaluate a dance.

      Anchor Standard 7: I can relate dance to other arts disciplines, content areas, and careers.

       

       

       

      Key Vocabulary

      Content Vocabulary

      Sentence Types

      • Interrogative - A sentence that asks a question and ends with a question mark.
      • Imperative - A sentence that gives a command or makes a request. 
      • Exclamatory - A sentence that shows strong emotion and ends with an exclamation mark. 
      • Declarative - A sentence that makes a statement and ends with a period.
      • Punctuation - Marks used in writing to separate words and numerals.

      Arts Vocabulary

      • Locomotor - Movement that travels from one location to another in a pathway through space
      • Non locomotor - Movement that occurs without the body traveling from one point to another point.

      Energy Qualities 

      • Percussive - A quality of movement characterized by sharp starts and stops, staccato jabs of energy.  
      • Suspended - A quality of movement that occurs in a moment of resistance to gravity, such as the instant in which a dancer hangs in space at the top of a leap.  
      • Sustained - A quality of movement that is smooth and unaccented. There is no apparent start or stop, only a continuity of energy.  
      • Swinging - A quality of movement established by a fall with gravity, a gain in momentum, a loss of momentum, and the repeated cycle of fall and recovery, like that of a pendulum.  
      • Vibratory - A quality of movement characterized by rapidly repeated bursts of percussive movements, like a jitter. 

       

       

      Materials

      • Sound source (CD player, iPod) and speaker  
      • Audio recording 
      • Cards with printed sentences 

       

      Instructional Design

      Opening/Activating Strategy

      • As a group, lead students in a warm up that includes these dance elements:
        • Movement energy qualities, including percussive, suspended, sustained, swinging, and vibratory. 
        • Locomotor and non-locomotor movements.
        • Identify these dance elements so that students learn dance vocabulary.

       

      Work Session

      ELA Discussion

      • Ask students to identify different sentence types (declarative, interrogative, exclamatory, and imperative). 
      • Ask students to match a movement quality of their choice to each sentence type. 
      • Ask students to identify the following parts of speech: verb, noun, pronoun, adjective, and adverb. 

      Small group choreography 

      • Divide students into groups and ask each group to create a movement/shape for each part of speech. Each group will create five movements. 
      • Now, give each group a card with a sentence on it. The members will need to identify the underlined parts of speech and the sentence type. 
      • Group members choreograph a short movement phrase that demonstrates the correct order of the underlined parts of speech as they appear, as well as the movement quality that matches the overall sentence type. 

      Presentation

      Once students have completed their choreographies, each group will present its sentence, identify the parts of speech, and present their choreography to the class. Option to choose music for each dance.

       

      Closing Reflection

      Ask students to explain, using dance vocabulary, how a movement of a peer group expresses a certain part of speech.

       

      Ask students to explain why they chose certain movements to express certain parts of speech.

       

       

       

      Assessments

      Formative

      • Students engage in collaborative discussion about movement choices and parts of speech.
      • Students correctly use dance vocabulary during discussion.

       

      Summative

      • Students correctly identify parts of speech and sentence types. 
      • The form and sequence of a group choreography correctly matched the sequence of the assigned sentence. 
      • Movements were correctly performed.

       

       

      Differentiation

      Acceleration: 

      Add layers to the choreographic process to:

      • Include transitions
      • Vary movements to show a clear beginning, middle, and end expressed in terms of movement (as opposed to simply following the order given by the sentence).

       

      Remediation:

      As a class, identify the underlined parts of speech and the sentence type and then assign groups to match movements with parts of speech.

       

       ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

      As part of the standards discussion but not standards themselves, the statements below reflect the connection between the choreographic process and the writing process and are interesting to consider while implementing this lesson. 

       

      Fundamentals of Writing  

      Employ a recursive writing process that includes planning, drafting, revising, editing, rewriting, publishing, and reflecting.  

       

      Interact and collaborate with peers and adults to develop and strengthen writing.  

       

      Produce writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, discipline, and audience. 

       

      Fundamentals of Communication  

      Employ a reciprocal communication process that includes planning, drafting, revising, editing, reviewing, presenting, and reflecting.  

       

      Communicate using style, language, and nonverbal cues appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.  

       

      Use active and attentive communication skills, building on other’s ideas to explore, learn, enjoy, argue, and exchange information.  

       

      Monitor delivery and reception throughout the communication process and adjust approach and strategies as needed.

      *This integrated lesson provides differentiated ideas and activities for educators that are aligned to a sampling of standards. Standards referenced at the time of publishing may differ based on each state’s adoption of new standards.

       Ideas contributed and updated by: Melissa Dittmar-Joy and Julie Galle Baggenstoss

       Revised and copyright:  August 2022 @ ArtsNOW

       

      MOSAICS AND MATH 3-5

      MOSAICS AND MATH

      MOSAICS AND MATH

      Learning Description

      In this lesson, students will use multiplication and division to create a mosaic using a watercolor crayon resist.

       

      Learning Targets

      GRADE BAND: 3-5
      CONTENT FOCUS: VISUAL ARTS & MATH
      LESSON DOWNLOADS:

      Download PDF of this Lesson

      "I Can" Statements

      “I Can…”

      • I can use multiplication and division to create a mosaic.

      • I can use crayon and watercolor to create a crayon watercolor resist painting.

      • I can create an array using a ruler and pencil.

      • I can determine factors of 54.

      Essential Questions

      • How can you utilize multiplication and division to create a mosaic?

      • How can you use an array to determine factors of 54?

       

      Georgia Standards

      Curriculum Standards

      Math

      Grade 3: 3.GSR.7: Identify area as a measurable attribute of rectangles and determine the area of a rectangle presented in real-life, mathematical problems. 

      3.GSR.8: Determine the perimeter of a polygon presented in real-life, mathematical problems.

      3.PAR.3: Use part-whole strategies to solve real-life, mathematical problems involving multiplication and division with whole numbers within 100.

      Grade 4

      4.PAR.3: Generate and analyze patterns, including those involving shapes, input/output diagrams, factors, multiples, prime numbers, and composite numbers.

      4.GSR.8: Identify and draw geometric objects, classify polygons based on properties, and solve problems involving area and perimeter of rectangular figures.

       

      Grade 55.NR.2: Multiply and divide multi-digit whole numbers to solve relevant, mathematical problems. 

      Science Grade 4:S4E3. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to demonstrate the water cycle.a.Plan and carry out investigations to observe the flow of energy in water as it changes states from solid (ice) to liquid (water) to gas (water vapor) and changes from gas to liquid to solid.b.Develop models to illustrate multiple pathways water may take during the water cycle (evaporation, condensation, and precipitation).

      Grade 5: S5P1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to explain the differences between a physical change and a chemical change.a.Plan and carry out investigations of physical changes by manipulating, separating and mixing dry and liquid materials.

       

       

      Arts Standards

      Grade 3: 

      VA3.CR.1 Engage in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas by using subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning.

      VA3.CR.2 Create works of art based on selected themes. 

      VA3.CR.3 Understand and apply media, techniques, processes, and concepts of two dimensional art. 

      VA3.RE.1 Use a variety of approaches for art criticism and to critique personal works of art and the artwork of others to enhance visual literacy.

      Grade 4: 

      VA4.CR.1 Engage in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas by using subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning.

      VA4.CR.2 Create works of art based on selected themes. 

      VA4.CR.3 Understand and apply media, techniques, processes, and concepts of two dimensional art. 

      VA4.CN.3 Develop life skills through the study and production of art (e.g. collaboration, creativity, critical thinking, communication).

      Grade 5: 

      VA5.CR.1 Engage in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas by using subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning.

      VA5.CR.2 Create works of art based on selected themes. 

      VA5.CR.3 Understand and apply media, techniques, processes, and concepts of two dimensional art.

      VA5.CN.3 Develop life skills through the study and production of art (e.g. collaboration, creativity, critical thinking, communication).

       

       

      South Carolina Standards

      Curriculum Standards

      3rd Grade

      3.ATO.1 Use concrete objects, drawings and symbols to represent multiplication facts of two single-digit whole numbers and explain the relationship between the factors (i.e., 0 – 10) and the product. 

      3.ATO.2 Use concrete objects, drawings and symbols to represent division without remainders and explain the relationship among the whole number quotient (i.e., 0 – 10), divisor (i.e., 0 – 10), and dividend. 

      3.ATO.3 Solve real-world problems involving equal groups, area/array, and number line models using basic multiplication and related division facts. Represent the problem situation using an equation with a symbol for the unknown

       

      4th Grade

      4.ATO.1 Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison (e.g. interpret 35 = 5x7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5.) Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations. 

      4.ATO.2 Solve real-world problems using multiplication (product unknown) and division (group size unknown, number of groups unknown).

       

       

      Arts Standards

      Anchor Standard 1: I can use the elements and principles of art to create artwork.

      Anchor Standard 2: I can use different materials, techniques, and processes to make art.

      Anchor Standard 5: I can interpret (read) and evaluate the meaning of an artwork.

      Anchor Standard 7: I can relate visual arts ideas to other arts disciplines, content areas, and careers.

       

       

       

       

       

      Key Vocabulary

      Content Vocabulary

      • Array - A way of arranging objects or images in rows and columns
      • Multiplication - Repeated addition of numbers of the same size
      • Division - Repeated subtraction of numbers of the same size
      • Factor - A number that can be used to evenly divide into another number

      Arts Vocabulary

      • 7 Elements of Art - Line, shape, form, texture, color, value, space
      • Line - One of the seven Elements of Art; it is a mark made by a pointed tool such as a brush, pen or stick; a moving point.
      • Shape - One of the seven Elements of Art; it is a flat, enclosed area that has two dimensions, length and width. Artists use both geometric and organic shapes.
      • Space - How the Elements of Art are organized in an artwork. It is used to create the illusion of depth. Space can be two-dimensional, three-dimensional, negative and/or positive.
      • Watercolor wash - A layer of watercolor that completely covers a surface and is translucent
      • Variegated watercolor wash - A watercolor wash that transitions from one color to another color
      • Crayon watercolor resist - The process of using crayon or oil pastel (oil based) to draw on a surface and then covering it with a watercolor wash.
      • Mosaic - An artform that is a picture or pattern produced by arranging together small colored pieces of hard material, such as stone, tile, or glass. (Oxford Languages)
      • Composition - The way the Elements of Art are arranged in an artwork
      • Warm colors - Red, orange, yellow
      • Cool colors - Green, blue, violet
      • Analogous colors - Colors next to each other on the color wheel (Example: red, orange, yellow)
      • Complementary colors - Colors across from each other on the color wheel (Example: Orange and blue)
      • Contrast - An arrangement of opposite elements in a composition to create visual interest

       

       

      Materials

        • 12x18-inch black construction paper
        • 9x6-inch white mixed-media paper
        • Crayons or oil pastels in warm and cool colors
        • Watercolor set
        • Paintbrushes
        • Water cups with water
        • Ruler
        • Pencil
        • Scissors
        • Glue sticks

         

         

        Instructional Design

        Opening/Activating Strategy

        • Show students an image of an ancient Roman mosaic on a board (Examples of ancient Roman mosaics).
        • Ask students to identify as many geometric shapes as they can in the image. 
        • Have students compare their findings with a partner. 
        • Then, ask students to take turns outlining the shapes on the board.
        • Explain that Shape is one of the seven elements of art that they will be using to create their own mosaic. 
        • Show students where the ancient Roman Empire was in relationship to where students live. 
        • Define for students what a mosaic is.
        • Briefly go over the 7 Elements of Art. Ask students to identify as many as they can in the image of the ancient Roman mosaic.

         

        Work Session

        • Explain that students will be focusing on Line, Shape, Space, and Color in their mosaic.
        • Demonstrate to students how to create a 6x9-in array using pencil and ruler. 

        Teacher tip: Have students mark their paper at each one inch interval around the entire paper. Then, have students connect the marks to create an array.

        • Ask students to use mathematical concepts that they have learned to determine how many 1-inch squares they have. 
        • Ask students to identify the area and perimeter using mathematical strategies.
        • Tell students that in the next step, they will be creating a watercolor-resist painting. They will draw with crayon and paint over the crayon with watercolor. The wax in the crayon will “resist” the water in the watercolor. 
        • Show students a color wheel
          • Discuss the different ways we can organize colors into color schemes: Warm, cool, complementary, and analogous (see color wheel)
          • Tell students that they will be drawing lines and shapes over the entire surface of their paper using either warm OR cool colored crayons. 
        • Tell students that next they will be painting over the entire surface of the paper in watercolor. Show students how to create a variegated watercolor wash using the video.
          • Students should create a variegated watercolor wash in warm colors if students used cool colored crayons; students should use cool colors if they used warm colored crayons. This will create contrast. 
          • Direct students to make observations about the water cycle as they watch the water in the watercolor evaporate and the paper dry. Ask students if this is a chemical or physical change.
        • Once the watercolor wash is mostly dry, students should cut out each square and divide them into equal groups using factors of 54.
        • Explain that students are going to arrange their groups (factors of 54) in a composition on their black paper. Once they have arranged them, they will glue them down.
          • Composition is how an artist arranges the elements of art, like line, shape, and color, in their artwork.

        Teacher tip: Have students place all of their pieces on their paper BEFORE beginning to glue them down.

         

        Closing Reflection

        • Have students explain to a partner how they grouped their pieces of the watercolor-resist into factors of 54 in their mosaic.
        • Ask students to explain how they determined the size of their groupings.
        • Ask students to identify which elements of art they used in their mosaic.

        Assessments

        Formative

        Teachers will assess understanding through the:

        • Shapes students identified in Roman mosaic
        • Students’ ability to group pieces of mosaic into factors of 54
        • Students’ color choices (checking for understanding of warm and cool colors)

         

        Summative

        CHECKLIST

        • Students will demonstrate what they learned by creating a watercolor crayon resist mosaic that utilizes contrasting warm and cool colors and demonstrates that they can arrange watercolor pieces in factors of 54 in a compositionally interesting way on their paper.

         

         

        Differentiation

         

        Acceleration: Instead of using 1x1-inch squares, have students determine other ways to divide their paper into equal sections (example).

        Remediation: 

        • Rather than creating a watercolor resist, have students use construction paper in contrasting colors to create their mosaic. 
        • Students can also fold paper into equal sections instead of using a ruler to measure equal sections before cutting.
        • Provide an array for students rather than having students create their own with rulers.

         

         ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

         

        *This integrated lesson provides differentiated ideas and activities for educators that are aligned to a sampling of standards. Standards referenced at the time of publishing may differ based on each state’s adoption of new standards.

        Ideas contributed by:  Katy Betts

        Revised and copyright:  2024 @ ArtsNOW

         

        PATTERNS IN MOTION 2-3

        PATTERNS IN MOTION

        PATTERNS IN MOTION

        Learning Description

        Understand the structure of pattern and sequence through the elements of dance and choreography using movements that represent geometric shapes!

         

        Learning Targets

        GRADE BAND: 2-3
        CONTENT FOCUS: DANCE & ELA
        LESSON DOWNLOADS:

        Download PDF of this Lesson

        "I Can" Statements

        “I Can…”

        • I can recognize the difference between a pattern and a sequence in shapes, rhyming words, and movements.
        • I can use dance and rhyming to decode single-syllable words.
        • I can create choreography to represent a pattern or sequence.

        Essential Questions

        • What are different ways we can represent sequence and patterns through movement?
        • How can we use dance and rhyming to decode single-syllable words?
        • How can I create choreography to represent a pattern or sequence?

         

        Georgia Standards

        Curriculum Standards

        Grade 2: 

        ELAGSE2RL4 Describe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song.

         

        ELAGSE2RF3 Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.

         

        ELAGSE2SL1 Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.

         

        Grade 3: 

        ELAGSE3RF3 Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words

         

        ELAGSE3SL1 Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 3 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

         

        Arts Standards

        Grade 2:

        ESD2.CR.1 Demonstrate an understanding of the choreographic process.

        ESD2.CR.2 Demonstrate an understanding of dance as a form of communication.

        ESD2.PR.1 Identify and demonstrate movement elements, skills, and terminology in dance.

        ESD2.RE.1 Demonstrate critical and creative thinking in dance.

        ESD2.CN.3 Identify connections between dance and other areas of knowledge.

         

        Grade 3:

        ESD3.CR.1 Demonstrate an understanding of the choreographic process.

        ESD3.CR.2 Demonstrate an understanding of dance as a form of communication.

        ESD3.PR.1 Identify and demonstrate movement elements, skills, technique, and terminology in dance

        ESD3.RE.1 Demonstrate critical and creative thinking in dance.

        ESD3.CN.3 Identify connections between dance and other areas of knowledge.

         

         

         

        South Carolina Standards

        Curriculum Standards

        Grade 2:

        READING - Literary Text (RL) 

        Standard 2: Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds. 

        Standard 3: Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words.

         

        COMMUNICATION (C)  

        Standard 1: Interact with others to explore ideas and concepts, communicate meaning, and develop logical interpretations through collaborative conversations; build upon the ideas of others to clearly express one’s own views while respecting diverse perspectives.

         

        Grade 3:READING - Literary Text (RL) 

        Standard 2: Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds. 

        Standard 3: Know and apply grade-level phonics and word analysis skills in decoding words. 

         

        COMMUNICATION (C)  

        Standard 1: Interact with others to explore ideas and concepts, communicate meaning, and develop logical interpretations through collaborative conversations; build upon the ideas of others to clearly express one’s own views while respecting diverse perspectives.

         

         

        Arts Standards

        Grades 2-3:

        Anchor Standard 1: I can use movement exploration to discover and create artistic ideas and works.

        Anchor Standard 2: I can choreograph a dance.

        Anchor Standard 3: I can perform movements using the dance elements.

        Anchor Standard 5: I can describe, analyze, and evaluate a dance.

        Anchor Standard 7: I can relate dance to other arts disciplines, content areas, and careers.

         

         

         

         

        Key Vocabulary

        Content Vocabulary

          • Pattern - A set of elements repeated in a predictable manner
          • Sequence - A series of elements arranged with intention and does not always follow a pattern
          • Rhyming scheme - The pattern of rhymes at the end of each line
          • Rhyme - The similarity in sound between words or the ending sounds of words

          Arts Vocabulary

          • Choreography - The art of composing dances and planning and arranging the movements, steps, and patterns of dancers
          • Choreographer - A person who creates dances
          • Body shapes - Forms that the entire body or body parts take when making movement

           

           

          Materials

            • Music source and speakers
            • Cards printed with shapes
            • Cards printed with groups of shapes in patterns or sequences
            • Cards printed with groups of one-syllable words in patterns or sequences
            • Cards printed with poems

             

             

            Instructional Design

            Opening/Activating Strategy

            • Play music with a strong beat. As a class group, lead students in a warm up that establishes the beat of the music such as marching or clapping.
            • Next, lead them in making movements that have obvious geometric qualities using vocabulary from The Elements of Dance to describe body shapes. Examples include straight lines using arms and legs, rounded shapes using arms, etc.

             

            Work Session

            Movement discovery

            • Show students cards with geometric shapes printed on them and ask them to move to the beat to represent the shape of the card until you show a different card. Repeat this several times until students have discovered/created several different movements.

            Establish pattern versus sequence:

            • Continue the discovery activity holding the cards up for shorter periods of time and in patterns, ABAB at first and then more complicated. Open a handle question: How am I arranging the cards? How am I arranging your dance steps?
            • Ask students to explain the arrangement of the dance steps. They should arrive at the concept of patterns.
            • Repeat two previous steps using a sequence instead of a pattern.

            Choreographic process

            • Divide students into small groups. Give each group a card printed with a pattern or a sequence represented in shapes. Without sharing with other groups, students identify whether their card shows a pattern or sequence.
            • Students create dances based on the order of shapes on their cards and the dance movements that they discovered during previous segments of the lesson. Encourage students to use movements from the warm-up or create movements using the movements from warm-up as inspiration.
            • Allow students time to practice their dance.

            Performance

            • Peers identify whether the performing group is showing a sequence or pattern. When a pattern is performed, peers describe the pattern in terms of shapes represented by the dance movements.

            Poetry connection

            • Give each group a card with rhyming words that are arranged in a pattern or sequence, such as CAT, FROG, BAT, LOG (ABAB pattern) or CAT, FROG, LOG, BAT (ABBA sequence). Students determine the pattern or sequence.
            • Give each group a short poem and ask students to identify the rhyming scheme, which will be a sequence or a pattern.  

            Final dance 

            • Students create dances based on patterns or sequences that they identified in the previous step. They use the dance movements that they discovered during previous segments of the lesson. 
            • Allow groups to present poems and dances.

             

            Closing Reflection

            • Groups explain why they chose certain movements to express certain shapes. 
            • Students explain how looking for patterns versus sequences in shapes and dances is like looking for patterns versus sequences in poetry rhyming schemes.

            Assessments

            Formative

            Teachers will assess understanding through: 

            • Student engagement in collaborative discussion about movement choices, math concepts, and ELA concepts.
            • Students’ use of dance vocabulary to describe body shapes during discussion.
            • Students’ progress toward a finished choreography during collaborative group work period.

             

             

            Summative

            CHECKLIST

            • Students can present choreography that accurately portrays their assigned pattern or sequence. 
            • Students can recognize the difference between a pattern and a sequence in shapes, rhyming words, and movements.
            • Students can explain why they chose certain movements to express certain shapes.
            • Students’ choreography demonstrates that they can use dance and rhyming to decode single-syllable words.
            • Peers/audience can accurately identify the pattern or sequence expressed in peer choreography.

             

            Differentiation

            Acceleration:

            • Ask students to rearrange the final words of the poem to turn the sequence into a pattern (select a poem that is intrinsically flexible for this task).
            • Create a dance in small groups to express the rhyming scheme.
            • Use two-syllable words instead of single-syllable words in poetry connection.

             

            Remediation:

            • Use one poem to work with as a class rather than multiple poems.

             

             ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

            • Classroom Tips: Set up chairs and tables in a circular format to maximize students’  engagement and ability to see their peers during the activity and  performance. Also establish parameters for acceptable movement choices and discuss audience  behavior/etiquette with students.
            • The Elements of Dance

            *This integrated lesson provides differentiated ideas and activities for educators that are aligned to a sampling of standards. Standards referenced at the time of publishing may differ based on each state’s adoption of new standards.

            Ideas contributed and updated by: Julie Galle Baggenstoss and Melissa Dittmar-Joy

            Revised and copyright:  August 2022 @ ArtsNOW

            PATTERNS IN MOTION K-1

            PATTERNS IN MOTION

            PATTERNS IN MOTION

            Learning Description

            Understand the structure of pattern and sequence through the elements of dance and choreography using movements that represent geometric shapes!

             

            Learning Targets

            GRADE BAND: K-1
            CONTENT FOCUS: DANCE & MATH
            LESSON DOWNLOADS:

            Download PDF of this Lesson

            "I Can" Statements

            “I Can…”

            • I can recognize the difference between a pattern and a sequence in shapes and movements.

            • I can create choreography to represent a pattern or sequence.

            • I can create movements to represent geometric shapes.

            Essential Questions

            • What are different ways we can represent sequence and patterns through movement?

            • How can I create choreography to represent a pattern or sequence?

            • How can I use movement to represent geometric shapes?

             

            Georgia Standards

            Curriculum Standards

            Kindergarten: 

            K.PAR.6: Explain, extend, and create repeating patterns with a repetition, not exceeding 4 and describe patterns involving the passage of time.

             

            K.GSR.8: Identify, describe, and compare basic shapes encountered in the environment, and form two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional figures.

             

            Grade 1: 

            1.PAR.3: Identify, describe, extend, and create repeating patterns, growing patterns, and shrinking patterns found in real-life situations.

             

            1.GSR.4: Compose shapes, analyze the attributes of shapes, and relate their parts to the whole.

             

             

             

             

            Arts Standards

            Kindergarten:

            ESDK.CR.1 Demonstrate an understanding of the choreographic process. 

             

            ESDK.CR.2 Demonstrate an understanding of dance as a form of communication. 

             

            ESDK.PR.1 Identify and demonstrate movement elements, skills, and terminology in dance

             

            ESDK.RE.1 Demonstrate critical and creative thinking in dance.

             

            ESDK.CN.3 Identify connections between dance and other areas of knowledge.

             

            Grade 1:

            ESD1.CR.1 Demonstrate an understanding of the choreographic process.

             

            ESD1.CR.2 Demonstrate an understanding of dance as a form of communication.

             

            ESD1.PR.1 Identify and demonstrate movement elements, skills, and terminology in dance.

             

            ESD1.RE.1 Demonstrate critical and creative thinking in dance.

             

            ESD1.CN.3 Identify connections between dance and other areas of knowledge.

             

             

             

            South Carolina Standards

            Curriculum Standards

            Kindergarten:

            K.ATO.6 Describe simple repeating patterns using AB, AAB, ABB, and ABC type patterns.

             

            K.G.2 Identify and describe a given shape and shapes of objects in everyday situations to include two-dimensional shapes (i.e., triangle, square, rectangle, hexagon, and circle) and three-dimensional shapes (i.e., cone, cube, cylinder, and sphere). 

             

            Grade 1:1.ATO.9 Create, extend and explain using pictures and words for: a. repeating patterns (e.g., AB, AAB, ABB, and ABC type patterns); b. growing patterns (between 2 and 4 terms/figures).

             

            1.G.4 Identify and name two-dimensional shapes (i.e., square, rectangle, triangle, hexagon, rhombus, trapezoid, and circle).

             

             

            Arts Standards

            Anchor Standard 1: I can use movement exploration to discover and create artistic ideas and works.

            Anchor Standard 2: I can choreograph a dance.

            Anchor Standard 3: I can perform movements using the dance elements.

            Anchor Standard 5: I can describe, analyze, and evaluate a dance.

            Anchor Standard 7: I can relate dance to other arts disciplines, content areas, and careers. 

             

             

             

            Key Vocabulary

            Content Vocabulary

            • Pattern - A set of elements repeated in a predictable manner
            • Sequence - A series of elements arranged with intention and does not always follow a pattern
            • Geometric shape - A figure that is defined by mathematical properties and is measurable

             

             

            Arts Vocabulary

            • Choreography - The art of composing dances and planning and arranging the movements, steps, and patterns of dancers
            • Choreographer - A person who creates dances
            • Body shapes - Forms that the entire body or body parts take when making movement

             

             

            Materials

              • Music source and speakers
              • Cards printed with shapes
              • Cards printed with groups of shapes in patterns or sequences

               

               

              Instructional Design

              Opening/Activating Strategy

              • Play music with a strong beat. As a class group, lead students in a warm up that establishes the beat of the music such as marching or clapping.
              • Next, lead them in making movements that have obvious geometric qualities using vocabulary from The Elements of Dance to describe body shapes. Examples include straight lines using arms and legs, rounded shapes using arms, etc.

               

              Work Session

              Movement discovery

              • Show students cards with geometric shapes printed on them and ask them to move to the beat to represent the shape of the card until you show a different card. Repeat this several times until students have discovered/created several different movements.

              Establish pattern versus sequence:

              • Continue the discovery activity holding the cards up for shorter periods of time and in patterns, ABAB at first and then more complicated. Open a handle question: How am I arranging the cards? How am I arranging your dance steps?
              • Ask students to explain the arrangement of the dance steps. They should arrive at the concept of patterns.
              • Repeat two previous steps using a sequence instead of a pattern.
              • Discuss the difference between a sequence and a pattern.

              Choreographic process

              • Divide students into small groups. Give each group a card printed with a pattern or a sequence represented in shapes. Without sharing with other groups, students identify whether their card shows a pattern or sequence.
              • Students create dances based on the order of shapes on their cards and the dance movements that they discovered during previous segments of the lesson. Encourage students to use movements from the warm-up or create new movements using the movements from warm-up as inspiration.
              • Allow students time to practice their dance.

              Performance

              • Peers identify whether the performing group is showing a sequence or pattern. When a pattern is performed, peers describe the pattern in terms of shapes represented by the dance movements.

              Closing Reflection

              • Groups explain why they chose certain movements to express certain shapes. 
              • Students discuss their understanding of the difference between a sequence and a pattern.

              Assessments

              Formative

              Teachers will assess understanding through: 

              • Student engagement in collaborative discussion about movement choices and math concepts.
              • Students’ use of dance vocabulary to describe body shapes during discussion.
              • Students’ progress toward a finished choreography during collaborative group work period.

               

               

              Summative

              CHECKLIST

              • Students can present choreography that accurately portrays their assigned pattern or sequence. 
              • Students can recognize the difference between a pattern and a sequence in shapes and movements.
              • Students can create dance movements that represent geometric shapes.
              • Students can explain why they chose certain movements to express certain shapes.
              • Peers/audience can accurately identify the pattern or sequence expressed in peer choreography.

               

              Differentiation

              Acceleration:

              • Have groups create their own patterns using movements that represent geometric shapes and lines.
              • Incorporate ELA concepts by having students use rhyming words to create a pattern (example: ABAB - Cat, fox, hat, box) and then create choreography to represent the pattern.

              Remediation:

              • Create choreography as a whole class to the same pattern or sequence. Then, break students into groups to create their choreography to their assigned pattern or sequence.
              • Establish certain movements for shapes as a class that all students will use in their pattern or sequence choreography. Once students demonstrate mastery of the pattern or sequence using movements established as a class, allow students to create or choose their own movements for their pattern or sequence.

               

               ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

              • Classroom Tips: Set up chairs and tables in a circular format to maximize students’  engagement and ability to see their peers during the activity and  performance. Also establish parameters for acceptable movement choices and discuss audience  behavior/etiquette with students.
              • The Elements of Dance

              *This integrated lesson provides differentiated ideas and activities for educators that are aligned to a sampling of standards. Standards referenced at the time of publishing may differ based on each state’s adoption of new standards.

              Ideas contributed and updated by: Julie Galle Baggenstoss and Melissa Dittmar-Joy. Updated by Katy Betts.

               

              Revised and copyright:  April 2024 @ ArtsNOW