MOSAICS AND MATH 3-5

MOSAICS AND MATH

MOSAICS AND MATH

Learning Description

In this lesson, students will use multiplication and division to create a mosaic using a watercolor crayon resist.

 

Learning Targets

GRADE BAND: 3-5
CONTENT FOCUS: VISUAL ARTS & MATH
LESSON DOWNLOADS:

Download PDF of this Lesson

"I Can" Statements

“I Can…”

  • I can use multiplication and division to create a mosaic.

  • I can use crayon and watercolor to create a crayon watercolor resist painting.

  • I can create an array using a ruler and pencil.

  • I can determine factors of 54.

Essential Questions

  • How can you utilize multiplication and division to create a mosaic?

  • How can you use an array to determine factors of 54?

 

Georgia Standards

Curriculum Standards

Math

Grade 3: 3.GSR.7: Identify area as a measurable attribute of rectangles and determine the area of a rectangle presented in real-life, mathematical problems. 

3.GSR.8: Determine the perimeter of a polygon presented in real-life, mathematical problems.

3.PAR.3: Use part-whole strategies to solve real-life, mathematical problems involving multiplication and division with whole numbers within 100.

Grade 4

4.PAR.3: Generate and analyze patterns, including those involving shapes, input/output diagrams, factors, multiples, prime numbers, and composite numbers.

4.GSR.8: Identify and draw geometric objects, classify polygons based on properties, and solve problems involving area and perimeter of rectangular figures.

 

Grade 55.NR.2: Multiply and divide multi-digit whole numbers to solve relevant, mathematical problems. 

Science Grade 4:S4E3. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to demonstrate the water cycle.a.Plan and carry out investigations to observe the flow of energy in water as it changes states from solid (ice) to liquid (water) to gas (water vapor) and changes from gas to liquid to solid.b.Develop models to illustrate multiple pathways water may take during the water cycle (evaporation, condensation, and precipitation).

Grade 5: S5P1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to explain the differences between a physical change and a chemical change.a.Plan and carry out investigations of physical changes by manipulating, separating and mixing dry and liquid materials.

 

 

Arts Standards

Grade 3: 

VA3.CR.1 Engage in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas by using subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning.

VA3.CR.2 Create works of art based on selected themes. 

VA3.CR.3 Understand and apply media, techniques, processes, and concepts of two dimensional art. 

VA3.RE.1 Use a variety of approaches for art criticism and to critique personal works of art and the artwork of others to enhance visual literacy.

Grade 4: 

VA4.CR.1 Engage in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas by using subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning.

VA4.CR.2 Create works of art based on selected themes. 

VA4.CR.3 Understand and apply media, techniques, processes, and concepts of two dimensional art. 

VA4.CN.3 Develop life skills through the study and production of art (e.g. collaboration, creativity, critical thinking, communication).

Grade 5: 

VA5.CR.1 Engage in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas by using subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning.

VA5.CR.2 Create works of art based on selected themes. 

VA5.CR.3 Understand and apply media, techniques, processes, and concepts of two dimensional art.

VA5.CN.3 Develop life skills through the study and production of art (e.g. collaboration, creativity, critical thinking, communication).

 

 

South Carolina Standards

Curriculum Standards

3rd Grade

3.ATO.1 Use concrete objects, drawings and symbols to represent multiplication facts of two single-digit whole numbers and explain the relationship between the factors (i.e., 0 – 10) and the product. 

3.ATO.2 Use concrete objects, drawings and symbols to represent division without remainders and explain the relationship among the whole number quotient (i.e., 0 – 10), divisor (i.e., 0 – 10), and dividend. 

3.ATO.3 Solve real-world problems involving equal groups, area/array, and number line models using basic multiplication and related division facts. Represent the problem situation using an equation with a symbol for the unknown

 

4th Grade

4.ATO.1 Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison (e.g. interpret 35 = 5x7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7 and 7 times as many as 5.) Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations. 

4.ATO.2 Solve real-world problems using multiplication (product unknown) and division (group size unknown, number of groups unknown).

 

 

Arts Standards

Anchor Standard 1: I can use the elements and principles of art to create artwork.

Anchor Standard 2: I can use different materials, techniques, and processes to make art.

Anchor Standard 5: I can interpret (read) and evaluate the meaning of an artwork.

Anchor Standard 7: I can relate visual arts ideas to other arts disciplines, content areas, and careers.

 

 

 

 

 

Key Vocabulary

Content Vocabulary

  • Array - A way of arranging objects or images in rows and columns
  • Multiplication - Repeated addition of numbers of the same size
  • Division - Repeated subtraction of numbers of the same size
  • Factor - A number that can be used to evenly divide into another number

Arts Vocabulary

  • 7 Elements of Art - Line, shape, form, texture, color, value, space
  • Line - One of the seven Elements of Art; it is a mark made by a pointed tool such as a brush, pen or stick; a moving point.
  • Shape - One of the seven Elements of Art; it is a flat, enclosed area that has two dimensions, length and width. Artists use both geometric and organic shapes.
  • Space - How the Elements of Art are organized in an artwork. It is used to create the illusion of depth. Space can be two-dimensional, three-dimensional, negative and/or positive.
  • Watercolor wash - A layer of watercolor that completely covers a surface and is translucent
  • Variegated watercolor wash - A watercolor wash that transitions from one color to another color
  • Crayon watercolor resist - The process of using crayon or oil pastel (oil based) to draw on a surface and then covering it with a watercolor wash.
  • Mosaic - An artform that is a picture or pattern produced by arranging together small colored pieces of hard material, such as stone, tile, or glass. (Oxford Languages)
  • Composition - The way the Elements of Art are arranged in an artwork
  • Warm colors - Red, orange, yellow
  • Cool colors - Green, blue, violet
  • Analogous colors - Colors next to each other on the color wheel (Example: red, orange, yellow)
  • Complementary colors - Colors across from each other on the color wheel (Example: Orange and blue)
  • Contrast - An arrangement of opposite elements in a composition to create visual interest

 

 

Materials

    • 12x18-inch black construction paper
    • 9x6-inch white mixed-media paper
    • Crayons or oil pastels in warm and cool colors
    • Watercolor set
    • Paintbrushes
    • Water cups with water
    • Ruler
    • Pencil
    • Scissors
    • Glue sticks

     

     

    Instructional Design

    Opening/Activating Strategy

    • Show students an image of an ancient Roman mosaic on a board (Examples of ancient Roman mosaics).
    • Ask students to identify as many geometric shapes as they can in the image. 
    • Have students compare their findings with a partner. 
    • Then, ask students to take turns outlining the shapes on the board.
    • Explain that Shape is one of the seven elements of art that they will be using to create their own mosaic. 
    • Show students where the ancient Roman Empire was in relationship to where students live. 
    • Define for students what a mosaic is.
    • Briefly go over the 7 Elements of Art. Ask students to identify as many as they can in the image of the ancient Roman mosaic.

     

    Work Session

    • Explain that students will be focusing on Line, Shape, Space, and Color in their mosaic.
    • Demonstrate to students how to create a 6x9-in array using pencil and ruler. 

    Teacher tip: Have students mark their paper at each one inch interval around the entire paper. Then, have students connect the marks to create an array.

    • Ask students to use mathematical concepts that they have learned to determine how many 1-inch squares they have. 
    • Ask students to identify the area and perimeter using mathematical strategies.
    • Tell students that in the next step, they will be creating a watercolor-resist painting. They will draw with crayon and paint over the crayon with watercolor. The wax in the crayon will “resist” the water in the watercolor. 
    • Show students a color wheel
      • Discuss the different ways we can organize colors into color schemes: Warm, cool, complementary, and analogous (see color wheel)
      • Tell students that they will be drawing lines and shapes over the entire surface of their paper using either warm OR cool colored crayons. 
    • Tell students that next they will be painting over the entire surface of the paper in watercolor. Show students how to create a variegated watercolor wash using the video.
      • Students should create a variegated watercolor wash in warm colors if students used cool colored crayons; students should use cool colors if they used warm colored crayons. This will create contrast. 
      • Direct students to make observations about the water cycle as they watch the water in the watercolor evaporate and the paper dry. Ask students if this is a chemical or physical change.
    • Once the watercolor wash is mostly dry, students should cut out each square and divide them into equal groups using factors of 54.
    • Explain that students are going to arrange their groups (factors of 54) in a composition on their black paper. Once they have arranged them, they will glue them down.
      • Composition is how an artist arranges the elements of art, like line, shape, and color, in their artwork.

    Teacher tip: Have students place all of their pieces on their paper BEFORE beginning to glue them down.

     

    Closing Reflection

    • Have students explain to a partner how they grouped their pieces of the watercolor-resist into factors of 54 in their mosaic.
    • Ask students to explain how they determined the size of their groupings.
    • Ask students to identify which elements of art they used in their mosaic.

    Assessments

    Formative

    Teachers will assess understanding through the:

    • Shapes students identified in Roman mosaic
    • Students’ ability to group pieces of mosaic into factors of 54
    • Students’ color choices (checking for understanding of warm and cool colors)

     

    Summative

    CHECKLIST

    • Students will demonstrate what they learned by creating a watercolor crayon resist mosaic that utilizes contrasting warm and cool colors and demonstrates that they can arrange watercolor pieces in factors of 54 in a compositionally interesting way on their paper.

     

     

    Differentiation

     

    Acceleration: Instead of using 1x1-inch squares, have students determine other ways to divide their paper into equal sections (example).

    Remediation: 

    • Rather than creating a watercolor resist, have students use construction paper in contrasting colors to create their mosaic. 
    • Students can also fold paper into equal sections instead of using a ruler to measure equal sections before cutting.
    • Provide an array for students rather than having students create their own with rulers.

     

     ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

     

    *This integrated lesson provides differentiated ideas and activities for educators that are aligned to a sampling of standards. Standards referenced at the time of publishing may differ based on each state’s adoption of new standards.

    Ideas contributed by:  Katy Betts

    Revised and copyright:  2024 @ ArtsNOW

     

    PATTERNS IN MOTION K-1

    PATTERNS IN MOTION

    PATTERNS IN MOTION

    Learning Description

    Understand the structure of pattern and sequence through the elements of dance and choreography using movements that represent geometric shapes!

     

    Learning Targets

    GRADE BAND: K-1
    CONTENT FOCUS: DANCE & MATH
    LESSON DOWNLOADS:

    Download PDF of this Lesson

    "I Can" Statements

    “I Can…”

    • I can recognize the difference between a pattern and a sequence in shapes and movements.

    • I can create choreography to represent a pattern or sequence.

    • I can create movements to represent geometric shapes.

    Essential Questions

    • What are different ways we can represent sequence and patterns through movement?

    • How can I create choreography to represent a pattern or sequence?

    • How can I use movement to represent geometric shapes?

     

    Georgia Standards

    Curriculum Standards

    Kindergarten: 

    K.PAR.6: Explain, extend, and create repeating patterns with a repetition, not exceeding 4 and describe patterns involving the passage of time.

     

    K.GSR.8: Identify, describe, and compare basic shapes encountered in the environment, and form two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional figures.

     

    Grade 1: 

    1.PAR.3: Identify, describe, extend, and create repeating patterns, growing patterns, and shrinking patterns found in real-life situations.

     

    1.GSR.4: Compose shapes, analyze the attributes of shapes, and relate their parts to the whole.

     

     

     

     

    Arts Standards

    Kindergarten:

    ESDK.CR.1 Demonstrate an understanding of the choreographic process. 

     

    ESDK.CR.2 Demonstrate an understanding of dance as a form of communication. 

     

    ESDK.PR.1 Identify and demonstrate movement elements, skills, and terminology in dance

     

    ESDK.RE.1 Demonstrate critical and creative thinking in dance.

     

    ESDK.CN.3 Identify connections between dance and other areas of knowledge.

     

    Grade 1:

    ESD1.CR.1 Demonstrate an understanding of the choreographic process.

     

    ESD1.CR.2 Demonstrate an understanding of dance as a form of communication.

     

    ESD1.PR.1 Identify and demonstrate movement elements, skills, and terminology in dance.

     

    ESD1.RE.1 Demonstrate critical and creative thinking in dance.

     

    ESD1.CN.3 Identify connections between dance and other areas of knowledge.

     

     

     

    South Carolina Standards

    Curriculum Standards

    Kindergarten:

    K.ATO.6 Describe simple repeating patterns using AB, AAB, ABB, and ABC type patterns.

     

    K.G.2 Identify and describe a given shape and shapes of objects in everyday situations to include two-dimensional shapes (i.e., triangle, square, rectangle, hexagon, and circle) and three-dimensional shapes (i.e., cone, cube, cylinder, and sphere). 

     

    Grade 1:1.ATO.9 Create, extend and explain using pictures and words for: a. repeating patterns (e.g., AB, AAB, ABB, and ABC type patterns); b. growing patterns (between 2 and 4 terms/figures).

     

    1.G.4 Identify and name two-dimensional shapes (i.e., square, rectangle, triangle, hexagon, rhombus, trapezoid, and circle).

     

     

    Arts Standards

    Anchor Standard 1: I can use movement exploration to discover and create artistic ideas and works.

    Anchor Standard 2: I can choreograph a dance.

    Anchor Standard 3: I can perform movements using the dance elements.

    Anchor Standard 5: I can describe, analyze, and evaluate a dance.

    Anchor Standard 7: I can relate dance to other arts disciplines, content areas, and careers. 

     

     

     

    Key Vocabulary

    Content Vocabulary

    • Pattern - A set of elements repeated in a predictable manner
    • Sequence - A series of elements arranged with intention and does not always follow a pattern
    • Geometric shape - A figure that is defined by mathematical properties and is measurable

     

     

    Arts Vocabulary

    • Choreography - The art of composing dances and planning and arranging the movements, steps, and patterns of dancers
    • Choreographer - A person who creates dances
    • Body shapes - Forms that the entire body or body parts take when making movement

     

     

    Materials

      • Music source and speakers
      • Cards printed with shapes
      • Cards printed with groups of shapes in patterns or sequences

       

       

      Instructional Design

      Opening/Activating Strategy

      • Play music with a strong beat. As a class group, lead students in a warm up that establishes the beat of the music such as marching or clapping.
      • Next, lead them in making movements that have obvious geometric qualities using vocabulary from The Elements of Dance to describe body shapes. Examples include straight lines using arms and legs, rounded shapes using arms, etc.

       

      Work Session

      Movement discovery

      • Show students cards with geometric shapes printed on them and ask them to move to the beat to represent the shape of the card until you show a different card. Repeat this several times until students have discovered/created several different movements.

      Establish pattern versus sequence:

      • Continue the discovery activity holding the cards up for shorter periods of time and in patterns, ABAB at first and then more complicated. Open a handle question: How am I arranging the cards? How am I arranging your dance steps?
      • Ask students to explain the arrangement of the dance steps. They should arrive at the concept of patterns.
      • Repeat two previous steps using a sequence instead of a pattern.
      • Discuss the difference between a sequence and a pattern.

      Choreographic process

      • Divide students into small groups. Give each group a card printed with a pattern or a sequence represented in shapes. Without sharing with other groups, students identify whether their card shows a pattern or sequence.
      • Students create dances based on the order of shapes on their cards and the dance movements that they discovered during previous segments of the lesson. Encourage students to use movements from the warm-up or create new movements using the movements from warm-up as inspiration.
      • Allow students time to practice their dance.

      Performance

      • Peers identify whether the performing group is showing a sequence or pattern. When a pattern is performed, peers describe the pattern in terms of shapes represented by the dance movements.

      Closing Reflection

      • Groups explain why they chose certain movements to express certain shapes. 
      • Students discuss their understanding of the difference between a sequence and a pattern.

      Assessments

      Formative

      Teachers will assess understanding through: 

      • Student engagement in collaborative discussion about movement choices and math concepts.
      • Students’ use of dance vocabulary to describe body shapes during discussion.
      • Students’ progress toward a finished choreography during collaborative group work period.

       

       

      Summative

      CHECKLIST

      • Students can present choreography that accurately portrays their assigned pattern or sequence. 
      • Students can recognize the difference between a pattern and a sequence in shapes and movements.
      • Students can create dance movements that represent geometric shapes.
      • Students can explain why they chose certain movements to express certain shapes.
      • Peers/audience can accurately identify the pattern or sequence expressed in peer choreography.

       

      Differentiation

      Acceleration:

      • Have groups create their own patterns using movements that represent geometric shapes and lines.
      • Incorporate ELA concepts by having students use rhyming words to create a pattern (example: ABAB - Cat, fox, hat, box) and then create choreography to represent the pattern.

      Remediation:

      • Create choreography as a whole class to the same pattern or sequence. Then, break students into groups to create their choreography to their assigned pattern or sequence.
      • Establish certain movements for shapes as a class that all students will use in their pattern or sequence choreography. Once students demonstrate mastery of the pattern or sequence using movements established as a class, allow students to create or choose their own movements for their pattern or sequence.

       

       ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

      • Classroom Tips: Set up chairs and tables in a circular format to maximize students’  engagement and ability to see their peers during the activity and  performance. Also establish parameters for acceptable movement choices and discuss audience  behavior/etiquette with students.
      • The Elements of Dance

      *This integrated lesson provides differentiated ideas and activities for educators that are aligned to a sampling of standards. Standards referenced at the time of publishing may differ based on each state’s adoption of new standards.

      Ideas contributed and updated by: Julie Galle Baggenstoss and Melissa Dittmar-Joy. Updated by Katy Betts.

       

      Revised and copyright:  April 2024 @ ArtsNOW

      VISUALIZING ECONOMIC SYSTEMS 6-7

      VISUALIZING ECONOMIC SYSTEMS

       

      VISUALIZING ECONOMIC SYSTEMS

      Learning Description

      In this lesson, students will explore how they can express the characteristics of different economic systems through line, shape, and color. Students will then write about their artwork explaining how their artwork shows the different characteristics of each economic system.

       

      Learning Targets

      GRADE BAND: 6-7
      CONTENT FOCUS: VISUAL ARTS & SOCIAL STUDIES
      LESSON DOWNLOADS:

      Download PDF of this Lesson

      "I Can" Statements

      “I Can…”

      • I can describe the characteristics of a command, market, and mixed economy.

      • I can use line, shape, and color to express the characteristics of different economic systems.

      • I can explain the connection between my artwork and the characteristics of different economic systems.

      Essential Questions

      • What are the characteristics of a command, market, and mixed economy?

      • How can I use line, shape, and color to express the characteristics of different economic systems?

      • How can I explain the connection between my artwork and the characteristics of different economic systems?

       

      Georgia Standards

      Curriculum Standards

      Grade 6

      SS6E, SS6E7, SS6E10 

      Analyze different economic systems. a. Compare how traditional, command, and market economies answer the economic questions of 1-what to produce, 2-how to produce, and 3-for whom to produce. b. Explain that countries have a mixed economic system located on a continuum between pure market and pure command.

       

      Grade 7

      SS7E1, SS7E4, SS7E7

      Analyze different economic systems. a. Compare how traditional, command, and market economies answer the economic questions of 1-what to produce, 2-how to produce, and 3-for whom to produce. b. Explain that countries have a mixed economic system located on a continuum between pure market and pure command.

       

      Personal Finance and Economics

      SSEF3 Analyze how economic systems influence the choices of individuals, businesses, and governments. 

      1. Analyze how command, market and mixed economic systems answer the three basic economic questions (what to produce, how to produce, and for whom to produce) to prioritize various social and economic goals such as freedom, security, equity, growth, efficiency, price stability, full employment, and sustainability.

       

       

       

       

      Arts Standards

      Grade 6

      VA6.CR.1 Visualize and generate ideas for creating works of art. 

      VA6.CR.2 Choose from a range of materials and/or methods of traditional and contemporary artistic practices to plan and create works of art.

      VA6.CR.3 Engage in an array of processes, media, techniques, and/or technology through experimentation, practice, and persistence.

      VA6.CR.4 Incorporate formal and informal components to create works of art.

       

      Grade 7

      VA7.CR.1 Visualize and generate ideas for creating works of art. 

      VA7.CR.2 Choose from a range of materials and/or methods of traditional and contemporary artistic practices to plan and create works of art.

      VA7.CR.3 Engage in an array of processes, media, techniques, and/or technology through experimentation, practice, and persistence. 

      VA7.CR.4 Incorporate formal and informal components to create works of art.

       

      High School

      VAHSAD.CR.4 Incorporate formal and informal components to create applied design art products and/or designs.

       

      VAHSAD.RE.3 Engage in the process of art criticism to make meaning and increase visual Visual Art Georgia Standards of Excellence 

       

      VAHSAH.RE.3 Compare and contrast works of art, artists, cultures, and eras based on visual and contextual evidence.

       

      VAHSAH.CN.1 Evaluate the influence of historical, political, economic, social, cultural, religious, and technological factors on the development of selected works of art from prehistoric to contemporary times and in a variety of societies 

       

      VAHSCR.CR.1 Visualize and generate ideas for creating works of art. 

       

      VAHSAH.PR.1 Identify and discuss related themes throughout the history of art (e.g. power and authority, sacred spaces, human figure, narrative, nature, spiritual objects) as expressed in different media within each culture and time period (e.g. two-dimensional work, three-dimensional work, architecture, multi-media).

       

      VAHSAH.RE.1 Identify and describe how artistic expression is conveyed visually through subject matter, media, technique, and design (e.g. composition, color scheme). Visual Art Georgia Standards of Excellence 

       

      VAHSAHRE.2 Discuss aesthetic issues (e.g. why humans create, criteria for defining an object as art, the effect of how content affects value, standards of beauty and beauty’s role in defining art, how needs are fulfilled by art in varied societies). 

       

      VAHSAH.RE.3 Compare and contrast works of art, artists, cultures, and eras based on visual and contextual evidence. 

       

       

       

       

      South Carolina Standards

      Curriculum Standards

      Economics and Personal Finance

      Standard 1: Demonstrate an understanding of fundamental economic concepts at an individual, business, and governmental level.

      EPF.1.IN Research and utilize evidence to explain how various economic systems address the basic economic questions regarding distribution of resources.

       

       

      Arts Standards

      Artistic Processes: Creating- I can make artwork using a variety of materials, techniques, and processes.

      Anchor Standard 1: I can use the elements and principles of art to create artwork.

      Anchor Standard 2: I can use different materials, techniques, and processes to make art.

      Artistic Processes: Responding- I can evaluate and communicate about the meaning in my artwork and the artwork of others.

      Anchor Standard 5: I can interpret (read) and evaluate the meaning of an artwork.

      Artistic Processes: Connecting- I can relate artistic ideas and work with personal meaning and external context.

      Anchor Standard 7: I can relate visual arts ideas to other arts disciplines, content areas, and careers.

       

       

       

       

      Key Vocabulary

      Content Vocabulary

      • Market economy - An economic system in which all economic questions are answers by consumers and producers
      • Command economy - An economic system in which all economic questions are answered by the government
      • Mixed economy - An economic system in which economic questions are answered by both the government as well as producers and consumers

       

       

      Arts Vocabulary

      • Line - One of the Elements of Art; the path of a moving point
      • Shape - One of the Elements of Art; a two-dimensional or flat object; an enclosed line
      • Color - One of the Elements of Art; how light is seen as reflected or absorbed on a surface
      • Symbol - An image that has meaning

       

       

      Materials

         

         

        Instructional Design

        Opening/Activating Strategy

        • Display the painting, Chairman Mao en Route to Anyuan by Liu Chunhua (7th grade Social Studies) or The Bolshevik by Boris Kustodiev (6th grade Social Studies). Direct students to engage in the Artful Thinking “Step Inside” protocol. In this protocol, students ask themselves: 
        • Allow students time to discuss in small groups.
        • Provide context for the painting shown: Chairman Mao and the communist revolution in China or the Russian Revolution of 1917. 
        • Engage students in a conversation about what they know about economic systems in communist and socialist countries.

         

        Work Session

        ***Teacher note: If students have not learned about market, command, and mixed economies, pause the arts integrated lesson to teach these economic systems.

        • Provide students with a graphic organizer on the three main economic systems. 
          • One column has the economic system, one has a place for students to write characteristics, and one has a place for students to draw symbols, lines, shapes, and colors that represent characteristics of that economic system.
        • Show students images of lines, shapes, and colors
          • Examples: A straight line might symbolize complete control while a very wavy/curly line might symbolize total freedom; a slightly wavy line would represent a mixture of both a straight and very wavy/curvy line. A solid primary color (red, blue, yellow) or white or black might symbolize something that is absolute while gray or a secondary color, which is a mix of primary colors (orange, purple, green), might symbolize a mix of two economic systems.
          • In collaborative groups, direct students to identify what they think these lines, shapes, and colors represent. 
          • Help students connect these elements of art to characteristics of the three main economic systems. 
        • Show students an example of an abstract artwork such as Cossacks by Wassily Kandinsky versus a representational artwork like Chairman Mao en Route to Anyuan or The Bolshevik
          • Discuss with students how abstract artists use the Elements of Art (line, shape, form, value, space, color, and texture) to communicate meaning while representational artists use recognizable images to communicate meaning. Ask students what they see in Chairman Mao en Route to Anyuan or The Bolshevik that might symbolize meaning.
        • Explain to students that they will use symbols, lines, shapes, and colors to create an artwork that represents each economic system. 
          • Students will use these elements of art to represent something representational or abstract. Whichever they choose, they should be able to explain how their use of symbols, lines, shapes, and colors communicate the characteristics of each economic system.
        • Demonstrate to students how to create a trifold with their paper. Each section will represent a different economic system. 
        • Allow students time to complete their artwork.
        • Students should then write an artist statement in paragraph format that answers the following questions:
          • What are the three economic systems and what are their characteristics?
          • How did you show the characteristics of each economic system using symbols, lines, shapes, and colors (students should  be specific citing each characteristic and how it was represented.

        Closing Reflection

        • After students have created their artwork, students should present in collaborative groups how they represented each economic system using line, shape, and color.

        Assessments

        Formative

        Teachers will assess student learning using the following criteria:

        • Are students able to explain the characteristics of command, market, and mixed economic systems?
        • Are students able to identify symbols, lines, shapes, and colors that represent the characteristics of the economic systems?

         

        Summative

        CHECKLIST

        • Does the student’s final artwork demonstrate an understanding of the three economic systems through the use of symbols, lines, shapes, and colors?
        • Does the artist statement demonstrate a logical connection between the characteristics of each system and the symbols, lines, shapes, and colors that the student used?

        Differentiation

        Acceleration: Students can choose an economic system of one of the countries they are studying. Students will use what they learned in the economic systems artwork to create one large piece of art specifically about their selected country’s economic system. Students can work with partners or independently.

        Remediation: 

        • Provide guided notes in the graphic organizer under the “characteristics” section.
        • Allow students to work in groups of three–each student will create an artwork for one economic system. Students will put their artwork together once they’ve finished.
        • Allow students to explain how they showed the characteristics of their system(s) in their artwork orally.

         

         ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

         

        *This integrated lesson provides differentiated ideas and activities for educators that are aligned to a sampling of standards. Standards referenced at the time of publishing may differ based on each state’s adoption of new standards.

        Ideas contributed by:  Katy Betts

        Revised and copyright:  2023 @ ArtsNOW

        A Day With Dali 3

        Description

        Students will look at the print, “Persistence of Memory” by Salvador Dali and talk about what they see. Students will discuss the importance of foreground, middle ground and background in a painting. Students will then visually draw a creative clock ticking throughout the day, utilizing the sky to tell morning, afternoon and evening as the hands on the clocks move!