Grades 6-8:
Circuitry & Dance

DANCE

Circuitry & Dance

Program Description

This program was originally a 6-day unit on circuitry and dance. Because of Covid-19, it was adjusted to fit a virtual audience. Students looked at the elements of dance through the concept of a simple circuit.

 

Learning Targets

“I Can…”

  • Explain how a circuit works.
  • Explain the elements of a circuit and how they work together.
  • Relate the elements of a circuit to dance elements.
  • Communicate a message through choreography and movement.

Essential Questions

  • How are circuits & choreography related?
  • How can I use movement to illustrate the concept of a simple circuit?

Curriculum Standards

S5P2. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to investigate electricity.
b. Design a complete, simple electric circuit, and explain all necessary components.
c. Plan and carry out investigations on common materials to determine if they are insulators or conductors of electricity.

S8P2. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about the law of conservation of energy to develop arguments that energy can transform from one form to another within a system.
b. Plan and carry out an investigation to explain the transformation between kinetic and potential energy within a system (e.g., roller coasters, pendulums, rubber bands, etc.).
d. Plan and carry out investigations on the effects of heat transfer on molecular motion as it relates to the collision of atoms (conduction), through space (radiation), or in currents in a liquid or a gas (convection).

 

Arts Standards

ESD4.CR.1 Demonstrate an understanding of the choreographic process. 

 

  1. Explore a variety of choreographic structures, forms, and designs (e.g. AB, ABA, canon, call-response, narrative, complementary/contrasting shapes, symmetry).
  2. Demonstrate proper dance technique while performing choreography.

Implement the use of props within choreography.

 

ESD4.CR.2 Demonstrate an understanding of dance as a form of communication.

 

a. Use movement to express an idea or feeling.

b. Understand how theatrical elements (e.g. costuming, lighting) contribute to the meaning of dance.

Content Vocabulary

  • Source: A supply of moving electrons
  • Voltage: electromotive force or potential difference expressed in volts.
  • Resistance: A physical property of materials. If a material has a high resistance, it opposes the passage of a steady electric current. The lower the resistance, the easier it is to force electrons to leave atoms and move through the material.
  • Load: A component that consumes power supplied by a power source.
  • Current:  the time rate of flow of electric charge
  • Wire: filament made of flexible metal
  • Conductor: creates a pathway for electrons
  • Insulator:  prevents the flow of electrons
  • Pathway: a path, course, route, or way for an electrical current to flow

Arts Vocabulary

  • Level: one of the aspects of movement (high, middle, low)
  • Pathway: designs traced on the floor or through the air as a dancer moves through space.
  • Sustained Movement: smooth and unaccented.
  • Suspended Movement: occurs in a moment of resistance to gravity.
  • Percussive Movement: movement with sharp starts and stops.
  • Vibratory Movement: movement with rapid, repeated bursts of energy.
  • Swimming Movement: movement with a repeated cycle of fall and recovery like a pendulum.
  • Locomotor: movement that travels through space.
  • Non-Locomotor: movement that does not travel through space.

Summative Assessment

  • Students create a paper circuit that works using series circuit concepts.
  • Students create a wearable circuit using the LilyPad Arduinos and conductive thread.
  • Students create choreography that demonstrates the concept of energy traveling through a circuit

Materials

  • LEDs
  • Copper Tape
  • Paper (card stock*, copy paper, construction paper)
  • Coin Cell Batteries (one per person)
  • Conductive Thread
  • Lilypad LEDs
  • Felt
  • Thread
  • Sewing Needles
  • Battery holders
  • Makey Makeys

*preferred

Visual Arts Activating Strategy (5-10 min)

Each day we began our class with a 15-minute dance-inspired warm-up exercise. The purpose of this activating strategy is to get their heart rates up and have them working with some of the dance skills we will be using throughout the program.

 

Visual Arts Main Activity

PROCESS:

 

Day 1:

  • Warm up
  • Group discussions “What is a circuit”
    • This discussion focused on a simple circuit (switch, wire, power source, load)
  • Group tested out ideas of what each element would look like as a movement.
  • Group discussed Alternating Currents vs Direct Current.
  • Group created a circuit movement inspired by an Alternating Current Circuit.  Each element in the circuit was expressed through movement and put together to form simple choreography.
  • STEM Connection
    • Students created “Paper Circuits” using copper tape, an LED, and a coin cell battery. This demonstrated the simple circuit we learned about.

 

Day 2:

  • Warm up
  • Group review of “What is a circuit”
  • Students performed group choreography illustrating AC created the previous day.
  • Group discussed Source, Voltage, Resistance, and Load.
  • Each student created a movement to represent each of these vocabulary words.
  • Students taught each other their movements.
  • Students were assigned to practice overnight.
  • STEM Connection
    • Students used various objects to explore with Makey Makeys.

 

 

Day 3:

  • Warm up
  • Group review of “What is a circuit” and shared what they created the day before.
  • Teacher put the choreography together and students created and practiced a dance to illustrate the power of circuitry.
  • Students used an Electric Circuit toy to create a human circuit as part of their choreography.
  • Students listened to various songs to choose the music that best related to their choreography.
  • STEM Connection
    • Students learned about wearable circuits and began working on their own design.

 

Day 4 (Online):

  • Warm up/ Introduce specific dance movement (~30 minutes) (Clip)
  • Group review of circuitry vocabulary.
  • Students were given 5 minutes to create a new movement for their circuit vocabulary.
  • Students shared out.
  • Group review of what was in their bags (Felt, Coin Cell Batteries (one per person), Conductive Thread, Lilypad LEDs, Felt, Thread, Sewing Needles, & Battery holders for the long-term project to create a wearable circuit)

 

Day 5:

  • Warm up/ Introduce specific dance movement (~30 minutes)
  • Group review of circuitry vocabulary.
  • Group review of paper circuits and Series vs Parallel circuits.
  • Students created “Positivity Posters” using the Paper Circuits
  • Students also created movements that represent the message conveyed in the Positivity Poster.
  • Demonstration of how to create a paper circuit. (Clip)

 

Day 6:

  • Warm up: Students are led through a warmup
  • Vocabulary review in choreography- Source, current Load current source
  • Student shared Positivity Poster and Choreography (Clip)
  • Group Performed student choreography (Clip)

 

Reflection Questions

  • What do we know about circuits?
  • How did our paper circuits reflect our choreography?
  • How did your positivity poster and choreography work together?

 

Additional Resources

 

Grades 4-8:
Light and Sound

VISUAL ARTS

Light & Sound

Description

In this program, we investigated Light and Sound through STEM activities, visual art, music, and dance.

 

Learning Targets

“I Can…”

  • Explain reflection and refraction.
  • Explain how pixels work together to give off colors.
  • Describe how sound waves move and how frequency is related to the sound an object produces..
  • Show how lighting and sound affects a piece of choreography.
  • Demonstrated how transparent, translucent, and opaque work together in visual art.

Essential Questions

  • How can I obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about the nature of light and how light interacts with objects?
  • How can I obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about how sound is produced and changed and how sound and/ or light can be used to communicate?
  • How can I develop and use a model to compare and contrast how light and sound waves are reflected, refracted, or absorbed through various materials?
  • How can I develop and use a model to illustrate how transparent, translucent, and opaque materials work in relation to light?

Curriculum Standards

S4P1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about the nature of light and how light interacts with objects.

 

  1. Plan and carry out investigations to observe and record how light interacts with various materials to classify them as opaque, transparent, or translucent.
  2. Plan and carry out investigations to describe the path light travels from a light source to a mirror and how it is reflected by the mirror using different angles.
  3. Plan and carry out an investigation utilizing everyday materials to explore examples of when light is refracted. (Clarification statement: Everyday materials could include prisms, eyeglasses, and a glass of water.

S4P2. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about how sound is produced and changed and how sound and/or light can be used to communicate.

 

  1. Plan and carry out an investigation utilizing everyday objects to produce sound and predict the effects of changing the strength or speed of vibrations.
  2. Design and construct a device to communicate across a distance using light and/or sound.

S8P4. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to support the claim that electromagnetic (light) waves behave differently than mechanical (sound) waves.

 

  1. Develop and use a model to compare and contrast how light and sound waves are reflected, refracted, absorbed, diffracted or transmitted through various materials. (Clarification statement: Include echo and how color is seen but do not cover interference and scattering.)

 

Arts Standards

VA4.CR.1 Engage in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas by using subject matter and symbols to communicate meaning.

VA4.CR.2 Create works of art based on selected themes.

VA4.CN.3 Develop life skills through the study and production of art (e.g. collaboration, creativity, critical thinking, communication).

VA5.PR.1 Plan and participate in appropriate exhibition(s) of works of art to develop the identity of self as artist.

VA5.CN.3 Develop life skills through the study and production of art (e.g. collaboration, creativity, critical thinking, communication).

VA6.CR.1 Visualize and generate ideas for creating works of art.

VA6.CR.3 Engage in an array of processes, media, techniques, and/or technology through experimentation, practice, and persistence.

VA6.CR.6 Keep an ongoing visual and verbal record to explore and develop works of art.

VA6.PR.1 Plan, prepare, and present completed works of art.

VA7.CR.1 Visualize and generate ideas for creating works of art.

VA7.CR.2 Choose from a range of materials and/or methods of traditional and contemporary artistic practices to plan and create works of art.

VA7.CR.3 Engage in an array of processes, media, techniques, and/or technology through experimentation, practice, and persistence.

VA7.PR.1 Plan, prepare, and present completed works of art

VA8.CR.1 Visualize and generate ideas for creating works of art.

VA8.CR.2 Choose from a range of materials and/or methods of traditional and contemporary artistic practices to plan and create works of art.

VA8.CR.3 Engage in an array of processes, media, techniques, and/or technology through experimentation, practice, and persistence.

ESD4.CR.1 Demonstrate an understanding of the choreographic process.

ESD4.CR.2 Demonstrate an understanding of dance as a form of communication.

ESD4.PR.4 Understand and apply music concepts to dance.

ESD4.CN.3 Integrate dance into other areas of knowledge.

ESD5.CR.1 Demonstrate an understanding of the choreographic process.

ESD5.PR.2 Understand and model dance etiquette as a classroom participant, performer, and observer.

ESD5.PR.4 Understand and apply music concepts to dance. a. Demonstrate and create movement in response to a variety of musical selections. b. Demonstrate musicality while performing dance phrases.

ESD5.RE.1 Demonstrate critical and creative thinking in dance.

MSD.PR.4 Understand and apply music concepts to dance.

MSD.RE.1 Demonstrate critical and creative thinking in dance.

MSD.CR.2 Demonstrate an understanding of dance as a form of communication.

MSD.CN.3 Demonstrate an understanding of dance as it relates to other areas of knowledge.

ESGM4.CR.1a. Improvise rhythmic question and answer phrases using a variety of sound sources.

ESGM4.PR.2a. Perform rhythmic patterns with body percussion and a variety of instruments using appropriate technique.

EESGM4.RE.1c. Identify and classify (e.g. families, ensembles) classroom, orchestral, American folk, and world instruments by sight and sound.

ESGM4.CN.1b. Discuss connections between music and disciplines outside the fine arts.

ESGM5.CR.1 Improvise rhythmic phrases.

ESGM5.PR.2a. Perform rhythmic patterns with body percussion and a variety of instruments using appropriate technique.

ESGM5.RE.1b. Describe music using appropriate vocabulary (e.g. fortissimo/pianissimo, presto/largo/moderato/allegro/adagio, legato/staccato, major/minor), intervals (e.g. step, skip, repeat, leap), timbre adjectives (e.g. dark/bright), and texture (e.g. unison/harmony).

ESGM5.RE.1c. Identify and classify (e.g. families, ensembles) classroom, orchestral, American folk and world instruments by sight and sound.

ESGM5.CN.1b. Discuss connections between music and disciplines outside the fine arts

MSGM6.RE.1a. Recognize and describe musical events in an aural example using appropriate musical terminology

MSGM7.CR.1b. Improvise simple rhythmic and melodic variations

MSGM7.RE.1a. Recognize and describe musical events in an aural example using appropriate musical terminology

MSGM8.CR.1b. Improvise melodic embellishments and simple rhythmic and melodic variations.

MSGM8.RE.1a. Recognize and describe musical events in an aural example using appropriate musical terminology

 

Content Vocabulary

  • Reflection: the throwing back by a body or surface of light, heat, or sound without absorbing it.
  • Refraction: A change of direction that light undergoes by passing obliquely through one medium.
  • Sound: vibrations that travel through the air or another medium and can be heard when they reach a person's or animal's ear.
  • Sound waves: a vibration of waves by which sound is projected.
  • Pitch: the quality of a sound governed by the rate of vibrations producing it.
  • Frequency: the number of occurrences of a repeating event per unit of time
  • Pixel: an area of illumination on a display screen, many pixels compose an image.
  • Digit: any of the numerals from 0 to 9.
  • Digital: a series of the digits 0 and 1 represented by values of a physical quantity such as voltage.
  • Additive color theory: starts without light (black) and light sources of various wavelengths combine to make a color.
  • Subtractive color theory: starts with light (white), colored inks, paints, or filters between the light source subtract wave lengths from the light, give it color.
  • Binary code: a coding system using the binary digits 0 and 1 to represent a letter, digit, or other character in a computer or other electronic device.
  • Bits: a unit of information expressed as either a 0 or 1 in binary notation.
  • RGB code: the RGB color model is an additive color model in which red, green, and blue light are added together in various ways to reproduce a broad array of colors.
  • Electric circuit: a path in which electrons from a voltage or current source flow.
  • Conductor: a material that transmits heat, electricity, or sound.
  • Insulator: a substance which does not allow the full passage of heat or sound.
  • Open circuit: an electrical circuit that is not complete.
  • Closed circuit: an electrical circuit that is complete.

Arts Vocabulary

  • Opaque: not able to be seen through; not transparent.
  • Transparent: allowing light to pass through so that objects behind can be distinctly seen.
  • Translucent: allowing light, but not detailed shapes, to pass through; semitransparent.
  • Literal movement: Movements that show exact meaning and actions.
  • Abstract movement: symbolic movement.
  • Choreography: the sequence of steps and movements in dance
  • Levels of Dance (low, middle, high): The three levels in dance movement are high, middle and low.
  • Percussive: This refers to a quality of movement characterized by sharp starts and stops; staccato jabs of energy.
  • Rhythm: a strong, regular, repeated pattern of movement or sound.
  • Mood: atmosphere that evokes certain feelings or vibes
  • Pitch: highness or lowness of sound.
  • Timbre: distinctive quality of sounds; the tone color or special sound that makes one instrument or voice sound different from another.

Materials

Materials Provided by Teachers

  • Two Plastic Bottles (approximately 12-16 oz in size)
  • Masking Tape (one roll)
  • Foil (1-2 foil sheets or approximately one foot from a roll)
  • Teaspoon of Uncooked Rice
  • Five rubber bands
  • Ziplock baggies to package materials for students
  • Lamination Pocket, laminated (cut one piece in half, students need ½ apiece)
  • Grid paper
  • One Small Bottle of Food Coloring
  • Alka Seltzer (one tablet per student)
  • Four LED lights
  • Two Coin Battery per student
  • One Bottle of Liquid Glue per student
  • One Piece of Cardstock
  • Journal
  • Pencil
  • Markers
  • CD
  • Flashlight
  • Watercolor paint
  • Watercolor paper
  • Clear tape
  • Kaleidoscope Kit
  • Colored paper (three half-sheets of assorted colors)
  • Plastic sheets (three half-sheets of assorted colors, you may cut plastic notebook dividers for these)
  • One Roll of Plastic tape

Materials Students Provided at Home

  • Large Box
  • Scissors
  • Bowl
  • Saran Wrap
  • Objects from around the house (tissue boxes, toilet paper tubes, etc.)
  • Salt
  • Newspaper (to protect surfaces)
  • Vegetable oil
  • Shaker Object (pack of tic tacs or bottle of sprinkles, etc.)
  • Grocery Bag

Activating Strategy (5-10 min)

Day 1 AM Session:

  • Introduce Light Refraction with Jar & Pencil Activity
    • Fill a clear container with water.
    • Tell the students you will be placing the pencil in the water.
    • Ask the first question.
    • Place the pencil in the water.
    • Give students a few moments to make observations.
  • Ask the following questions:
    • What do you think is going to happen?
    • What do you observe?
    • What do you believe is causing the “bent/ split” pencil illusion?
    • Introduce the word refraction

Day 1 PM Session:

  • Review the Light Box Magic STEM challenge from the morning session and allow students to discuss their observations/ discoveries
    • How the amount of light in the box may change with different amounts of water, different time of day, blocking the top side of the bottle, etc?
    • Light Box Example
  • Investigate the CD with reflections of light using house lighting and the flashlight provided
    • Possible questions to ask: What shapes and colors do you see in the rainbow?  What do you notice when you use two CDs? What do you notice when you put the flashlight close to the CD?
    • How does the CD act as a prism?
    • Allow students to write their observations in their journals.
    • Investigating Light

 

Day 2 AM Session:

  • Ask students the following questions to prompt discussions verbally or in the chat
    • What do you think of when you hear the word sound?
    • What do you think of when you hear the word waves?
  • Discuss that sound is made of vibrations and invisible soundwaves
  • Demonstrate and have students complete dancing sprinkles/ rice activity at the same time to demonstrate how you can “see” soundwaves
  • Sound Waves Example
  • Discuss how sound waves travel, how vibrations are recognized as different sounds, and how the size and shape of the sound waves determine the kind of sound heard.
  • Review various musical instruments, homemade and traditional. Have students compare and predict sounds of these instruments and how the sounds (vibrations) were created.
  • Have students find a way to create sound using objects around them and improvise an 8-beat pattern using that object.
  • Have students create an 8-beat pattern and repeat it. Add to YouTube backing track.

Day 2 PM Session:

  • Students will share their instruments they created after the morning STEM challenge.  Play eight beats of music together as a group/ class.
  • Discuss as a class the following questions
    • What is a shadow?
    • How might artists use shadows?
    • Possible answers: to make things look more realistic, to add depth, etc
  • Find a shadow in your house and spend five minutes sketching the object and its shadow in your journal with a pencil.

 

Day 3 AM Session:

  • Review shadow sculptures from the end of Day 2
  • Introduce how sound is related to dance
  • Students will watch a clip from Broadway’s STOMP to get students thinking about how sound is used in dance.  Video: STOMP - Established in 1994 NYC
    • Ask students what common household instruments they see in the video.

Day 3 PM Session:

  • View images of Yayoi Kusama’s work.  Students will discuss in chat what they observe/ notice about her work. (mirrors, reflections, infinity rooms, duplicates, etc)
  • What makes her work unique?
  • What themes do you notice?

 

Day 4 AM Session:

  • Introduction to vocabulary words transparent, translucent, and opaque by making a lava lamp. Possible questions to ask:
    • After pouring the water and oil into the glass, what do you believe is going to happen when food coloring is added? Will it mix with the water, oil, or both?
    • What do you observe when you initially add the food coloring?
    • If you continue to add food coloring to the water, will the water stay transparent or translucent?
  • Example

Day 4 PM Session:

  • Briefly discuss what an electric circuit is and what materials are used/needed to make a complete (closed) circuit
  • Show students how to use a coin battery to illuminate a LED light
  • STEM Challenge: LED Glue/ Salt Circuit
    • Gather materials: half piece of cardstock, coin battery, LED light, glue, salt and tray/ paper plate to work over
    • Fold the corner of your paper up to make a “switch”
    • “Draw” a line using glue from the folded corner of the paper and then towards the edge.  Be generous with the glue
    • Skip a space for your LED and continue your glue line back near the folded corner
    • add your LED to the space making sure the “legs” are in the glue
    • sprinkle a good layer of salt on the glue.  Lift the paper and dump the extra salt on the tray
    • When it is dry, use the coin cell battery to try and light up your LED
    • **The salt circuit is not a very strong circuit. The light will be dim. You may try paper circuits with copper tape for a brighter light.

Example

Main Activity

Day 1 AM Session: 

  • Students were introduced to the concept of light refraction during the activating strategy.
  • Students watched a video “Liter of Light” to be inspired by how light refraction is being used in 3rd World countries to reduce electricity costs for families.
  • Students STEM activity was to create a way to light up a “room” using light refractions.
  • Teachers demonstrated how to create a Light Box to demonstrate this concept.
  • Step 1: Gather your materials
  • Step 2: Fill your bottles with water (Add a few drops of food coloring if you want!)
  • Step 3: Trace the bottom of the bottles on the top of the box and carefully (and with a parent/older siblings help) cut holes.  Put tinfoil on the top of the box, covering the holes. Poke a hole in the foil over the open. This will help the light reflect into the bottles.
  • Step 4: Carefully (and with a parent/older siblings help) cut a hole in the side of the box to look inside.  We recommend cutting a smaller window or just eye holes.
  • Step 5: Push bottles into holes and look in the viewing window.
  • Example

Adapted from: https://www.trueaimeducation.com/light-box-magic/

  • Teachers demonstrated the relationship between colors and math (seeing the numbers in digital media). The following topics were discussed:
    • What does the word digital mean?
    • Pixels-comparing LED & LCD close up images of digital screens
    • Additive Color Theory vs Subtractive Color Theory
    • Teacher demonstrates a “large scale pixel” by using three lights (red, green, and blue bulbs)
    • Discuss how every pixel has three parts (red component, green component, and blue component)
    • Discuss how each pixel receives three digital (mathematical) signals--one signal for how much red light, how much green light, and how much blue light
    • Discussion of how number values in ColorMath are based on binary code
    • 8-bit Color: An RGB Code has 3 values (256 possible red values, 256 green values, and 256 blue values)
    • Presentation
  • Students can create their own digital art using https://paintz.app

Day 1 PM Session:

  • Students experimented with a flashlight and CD in the activating strategy.
  • After completing the investigation, instruct students trace the CD on a piece of watercolor paper
  • Students will use markers to draw the “lines/ rainbows” created by the flashlight against the CD.  Students may use their paint brush to paint water on top of the marker to use as a watercolor option (water of the washable markers acts like watercolor.
  • Students may then use the watercolor paint to paint outside of the CD showing what shapes and angles they see when observing the reflection of light against the CD
  • Allow approximately 10-15 minutes for students to paint their observations followed by a share out

Examples:

Day 2 AM Session: 

  • After introducing sound and soundwaves in the activating strategy, introduce the vocabulary word pitch.  You may do this by playing different sounds on an instrument
  • Show students a variety of instruments (these may be real instruments or instruments created from household/ classroom objects
  • Example
  • Allow students to find an object to create an instrument out of to play a beat (for example: pencil and water bottle make a drum, using spices/ sprinkles as a shaker)
    • using the instrument they create, play 8 beats together (all playing one note at the same time) followed by 8 beats of 8 counts of a beat of their choice
    • you may do this a few times to allow students to experiment with their instrument
  • STEM Challenge: Create & build your own musical instrument using household items (rubber bands, rice, toilet paper/ paper towel rolls, etc.)
    • students will share out their instruments and play music together at the beginning of their afternoon session

Day 2 PM Session: 

  • After sharing instruments and introducing shadows in the activating strategy, allow students to look at images of shadows made by sculptures
  • Show clip video of (time 1:40-4:00): Tim Noble & Sue Webster, NO - Exhibition & Limited Editions
  • Students are challenged with the task of creating a sculpture with household items that will create an interesting shadow.

 

Day 3 AM Session: 

  • After reviewing shadow sculptures and dance clip in the activating strategy, discuss the following:
    • STOMP is performed in theaters, but it is not a play, musical, or opera. It is not theater in the traditional sense of the word. There is no speech, dialogue or plot. However, it does have two characteristics of traditional theater: mime and characterization. Each performer has an individual character which is distinct from the others. These characters are brought out through the mime and dance in the show.
    • The entire show is highly choreographed, interweaving dance into all its aspects. In STOMP, there is a symbiotic relationship between dance and music. The music is created within the dance, but the dance itself is dependent on the music for its rhythm and character. STOMP shows a true marriage of movement and music, where both create and enhance each other.
  • Show second video: How To STOMP: Hands & Feet
    • Play the video a second time and ask students to mimic the dance moves taught in the video.  You may need to replay the video to allow
  • Show third video: How to STOMP: Bags
    • Ask students to create their own rhythm using bags from their house and share out
  • Show fourth video: How to STOMP: Breath Mints
    • Ask students to repeat the rhythm taught using something they can shake from their house (breath mints, spices, sprinkles, etc.)
  • Show fifth video: STOMP Pancakes 1 #StompAtHome
  • Think about all the different ways you made sound and the different ways you saw sound made in the STOMP videos.
    • Why do you think the different props made different sounds?
    • Challenge: Create your own STOMP inspired choreography using found sound.
  • Clip
  • STEM Challenge: Create Your Own Hologram
    • Follow directions of how to make a trapezoid pattern (see picture)
    • Cut out the pattern and trace four trapezoids on your clear plastic sheet
    • Cut out the four trapezoids and tape together four of the perpendicular lines to create a square pyramid.
    • Place your finished hologram on top of the video playing on your device
    • Example 1, Example 2

Day 3 PM Session:

  • After introducing Kusama’s work and discussing reflections, have students build their kaleidoscope using the kaleidoscope kit.
  • Allow students time to investigate and place different objects in the kaleidoscope to see how it appears.

Ask students to sketch what they see in their kaleidoscope in their journals

Day 4 AM Session:

  • Discuss a Lighting Director’s role in dance and show Mark Stanley: Lighting the New York City Ballet
    • Discuss how light gives character to dance and creates the mood
    • Light can also do the following: create space, intensity, shapes, shadows, dimensions, etc.
  • Discuss “What is mood? What are examples?”
    • Possible answers: mood is a literary element that evokes certain feelings or vibes in readers, but can be used the same way in dance
    • Examples of moods:  cheerful, reflective, gloomy, humorous, melancholy, whimsical, romantic, mysterious, ominous, calm, lighthearted, hopeful, angry, fearful, tense
  • Discuss “How can you create mood with lights?”
    • colors (how they mix), shadows (what will happen when things are in front of the lights), angle, intensity, movement of light, layers of light, etc.
  • Watch the following video clips and discuss what you believe the mood is and how did the lighting help create the mood?
  • Dance Challenge: Think about how lighting affected the mood in the various performances and complete the following steps:
    • 1. Pick a mood (for example: cheerful)
    • 2. Create a movement phrase that matches your mood.
    • 3. Are there any adjustments you can make to the lighting in your space to match the mood of your choreography?  Example: brighter lights, dimmer, lights, use shadows, colored light, light coming in at a different angle, light movement.

Day 4 PM Session:

  • After introducing circuits and completing LED salt/ glue circuit, show video clip of Tom Fruin’s work and allow students to type their observations in the chat
  • Ask students, “What do you need to make a shadow?”
    • Possible answers: light source, an object to block the sun, an opaque object, etc.
    • Why are some of the shadows in Tom Fruin’s work different colors?
    • Discuss transparent, translucent and opaque materials and how each respond to light.
  • Sculpture Challenge: Make a 3D sculpture incorporating transparent, translucent and opaque materials inspired by Tom Fruin’s work.

Here are some snippets of student work throughout the week: VIDEO

Reflection Questions

  • What colors did you feel worked together and why?
  • What challenges did you have during this process?
  • What tools worked best for your process and why?

 

TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION (Include technology that is integrated directly into the project. Ex: apps, websites for research, virtual field trips, mystery skype calls, etc..)

 

Google Meet

Google Classroom

Virtual STEM + Arts Summer Camp Slideshow

Student Activity Slideshow

Visual Arts Slideshow

https://musiclab.chromeexperiments.com/Sound-Waves/

Video: Liter of Light

Light Magic Box Website

https://Paintz.app

Video (timestamp 1:40-4:00): Tim Noble & Sue Webster, NO - Exhibition & Limited Editions

Video: STOMP - Established in 1994 NYC

Video: How To STOMP: Hands & Feet

Video: How to STOMP: Bags

Video: How to STOMP: Breath Mints

Video: STOMP Pancakes 1 #StompAtHome

Video: Fireworks Hologram Video

Video: Mark Stanley: Lighting the New York City Ballet

Video: Houston Ballet-Reveal-Garrett Smith Choreography

Video: “Ounce of Faith” | Trailer | Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater

Video: Trailer - IN Cognito Full Piece Premiere

Video: Tom Fruin’s Large-Scale Sculptures, Icons of Brooklyn’s Public Spaces

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=85ZptB9kgaM&t=344s

Grades 6-8:
Pour Painting

ART

Visual Arts Component - Pour Painting

Science and Visual Arts

Description

In this program, we will explore color, shape, fluidity, and light. Students will have a deeper understanding of how these elements work together to help an artist create their masterpieces. Through this process, students will be able to experiment with flow and shapes to create their artwork.

Learning Targets

“I Can…”

  • create shade and tints with paint
  • describe differences between mixing light and mixing paint colors.
  • create works of art using a variety of household tools.

Essential Questions

  • How do we manipulate our mediums to create abstract art?
  • What effect does shape have on the movement of our medium?

Curriculum Standards

S8P1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about the structure and properties of matter. 

S8P5. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about gravity, electricity, and magnetism as major forces acting in nature.

MGSE6.G.4 Represent three-dimensional figures using nets made up of rectangles and triangles, and use the nets to find the surface area of these figures. Apply these techniques in the context of solving real world and mathematical problems.

MGSE7.G.6 Solve real-world and mathematical problems involving area, volume and surface area of two- and three-dimensional objects composed of triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, cubes, and right prisms.

 

Arts Standards

VA4.CR.3 Understand and apply media, techniques, processes, and concepts of two-dimensional art. 

VA6-8.CR.3 Engage in an array of processes, media, techniques, and/or technology through experimentation, practice, and persistence.

Content Vocabulary

  • Gravity: the force that attracts a body toward the center of the earth, or toward any other physical body having mass.
  • 3-dimensional shape: a three-dimensional shape can be defined as a solid figure or an object or shape that has three dimensions – length, width and height.
  • Edges: the outside limit of an object, area, or surface; a place or part farthest away from the center of something.
  • Vertices: The common endpoint of two or more rays or line segments.
  • Faces: In any geometric solid that is composed of flat surfaces, each flat surface is called a face. 
  • Elevation: The angle of elevation of an object as seen by an observer is the angle between the horizontal and the line from the object to the observer's eye (the line of sight).
  • Volume: can be defined as the 3-dimensional space enclosed by a boundary or occupied by an object. 
  • Surface Area: The surface area of a solid object is a measure of the total area that the surface of the object occupies.
  • Flow: formalizes the idea of the motion of particles in a fluid. 
  • Viscosity: Viscosity is a physical property of fluids. It shows resistance to flow.

Arts Vocabulary

  • Value: value refers to the visible lightness or darkness of a color.
  • Shade: a shade is a mixture with black, which increases darkness. 
  • Tint: a tint is a mixture of a color with white, which reduces darkness
  • Primary: are basic colors that can be mixed to produce other colors. They are usually considered to be red, yellow, and blue.
  • Secondary: a color resulting from the mixing of two primary colors.
  • Tertiary: a color produced by an equal mixture of a primary color with a secondary color adjacent to it on the color wheel.

Summative Assessment

  • Gallery presentation
  • 100 Color Challenge
  • 3-D sculpture 
  • 3-5 Canvas experimentation paintings 
  • Community paint pour
  • property of fluids. It shows resistance to flow.

Materials

For Activating Activities

  • Red Light
  • Green Light
  • Blue Light
  • Paper
  • Paper plate
  • Paint (Acrylic)
    • Red
    • Yellow
    • Blue
    • Black
    • White
  • Paint brushes
  • Water
  • Paper towels
  • Pencil

For Main Activities

Activating Strategy (5-10 min)

Mixing Visual Light

Students went into the Black Box theater and created shadows using colored light. (Red, Green, and Blue) Students were able to see their shadows and what happens when you mix colored light. The result is a colored shadow.

Light is additive colors

Primary light colors are Red, Blue, and Green

  • red light + green light makes yellow light
  • red light + blue light makes purple light
  • green light + blue light makes aqua (cyan) light
  • blue light + red light makes pink (magenta) light
  • red + blue + green makes white light

Clip

Students theorized what would happen when you mix pigment colors.

 

Main Activity

PROCESS:

Day 1:

Mixing Pigments

  • Students participated in the 100 color challenge. Students were given a paper plate with red, yellow, blue, white, and black. Students drew 100 squares on a piece of paper and tried to create 100 different colors from the 3 primary colors plus black and white. 
  • You can discuss shades (adding black) and tints (adding white).

When students are done with their plates of paint (palette) they can use scrap paper or cardboard to make a fun print! (See Image below)

Day 2:

  • Finish 100 Color Challenge if needed.
  • Students watched several videos for inspiration for the Acrylic Pour Painting. VIDEO
  • Students explored the MakerSpace to find items to help build their 3-D sculpture.
  • Students used foam board, cardboard, small wooden blocks, small foam blocks, and craft glue to design and build small sculptures.
  • Let the sculptures dry overnight.

As students finish their sculpture, they can work on their 100 color project or help prepare the acrylic paint & floetrol.

Day 3:

  • Students prepared their sculpture for the addition of acrylic paint. Students chose colors and added floetrol and water to the acrylic base. This creates a fluid mix that flows easily.
  • Students poured the paint over the sculptures.
  • Students observed the flow of the paint for future paintings.
    • Students used shallow pans to hold their sculptures and collect any excess paint.
  • Clip 1 - Process
  • Clip 2 - Product

Day 4 & 5:

  • Students chose a variety of canvases and tools and experimented with their paint pours.

Day 6:

  • Students prepared their work as a Visual Arts Gallery.
  • Students set up a table for visitors to try the 100 color challenge and set up for a community paint pour. This artwork was permanently installed in the school.

Video Recap of the program (played during the Gallery Opening): Video

Reflection:

  • What colors did you feel worked together and why?
  • What challenges did you have during this process?
  • What tools worked best for your process and why?

Instructional Videos

Classroom Tips:

  • If carpeted room, put down drop cloths or newspaper for painting.
  • Room with no windows works great!

Reflection Questions

  • What brush worked the best? Why?
  • What did you change or improve on your brush while you were painting?
  • What object helped you create the effect you needed for your type of galaxy?

Additional Resources

  • Videos of paint pours: Link

Grade 6:
Astronomy

ASTRONOMY

Grade 6: Astronomy

Unit Description

In this arts integrated unit, students will become immersed in the areas of dance and the visual arts. Students will have a better understanding of the characteristics of the planets in our solar system as they choreograph dances to interpret specific planets. Students will also study three types of galaxies as they demonstrate their knowledge and understanding of galaxies through a visual arts project using glow-in-the-dark paints.

Unit Essential Question

What are the characteristics of galaxies, and how does Earth compare to other planets in our solar system?

Real World Context

We study and analyze the planets in our solar system, as well as different types of galaxies in outer space, in order to have a better understanding of the world we live in, the universe, and the galaxies that surround us. By understanding the characteristics of each of the planets in our solar system, we can compare and contrast their similarities and differences. The idea of space exploration includes the possibility of discovering new planets, galaxies, or solar systems.

Cross-Cutting Interdisciplinary Concepts

Relationships
Comparison (Compare and Contrast)
Parts of a Whole

Components

Dance Component: Dancing with Planets
In this component, students will study the planets of our galaxy and create a choreography piece that represents their planet. Students will understand the elements of dance, specifically movement qualities and how they can be used to express ideas. The students will be given the opportunity to make connections between movement qualities of dance and the characteristics of planets. The final outcome of this project will be a short film in which the students record their planet dance and learn how to edit a video that has been recorded.

Visual Arts Component: Glowing Galaxies Design Challenge
In this arts integrated component, students will create a visual representation of a glowing galaxy using paintbrushes that they create from everyday materials. Students will identify three types of galaxies found in our universe. Students will also describe the shapes and colors of these galaxies, understanding the reasons behind the shape and color of the galaxy.

Standards

Curriculum Standards

S6E1. Students will explore current scientific views of the universe and how those views evolved.

  1. Relate the Nature of Science to the progression of basic historical scientific models (geocentric, heliocentric) as they describe our solar system, and the Big Bang as it describes the formation of the universe
  2. Describe the position of the solar system in the Milky Way galaxy and the universe
  3. Compare and contrast the planets in terms of size relative to the earth, surface and atmospheric features, relative distance from the sun, ability to support life

Arts Standards

DMSPFD.2. Understands and models dance etiquette as a classroom participant, performer, and observer

DMSPCR.1. Demonstrates an understanding of creative and choreographic principles, processes, and structures

DMSPCR.2. Demonstrates an understanding of dance as a way to create and communicate meaning

DMSPRE.1. Demonstrates critical and creative thinking in all aspects of dance

VA6MC.2. Identifies and works to solve visual problems through creative thinking, planning, and/or experimenting with art materials, tools and techniques

VA6PR.1. Understands and applies media, techniques, and processes

VA6PR.2. Creates artwork reflecting a range of concepts, ideas, and subject matter

Character Education

Components

These two arts integrated components lead naturally into the concept and or the need for accepting all similarities and differences in humans. By learning how and why different planets are unique, but are still part of our solar system, we are able to also better understand the importance of people being different and how these differences allow for the world we live in to be exciting, perhaps challenging, as well as complex. Providing students with the tools necessary for working in groups and being part of a team is crucial for success to occur in and out of the school setting.

Attributes

Respect

  • For one another

Parts of a Whole

  • Cooperate/working in groups

Summative Assessment

  • Planet Movement Video: Students will create a choreographed dance, showing the characteristics/attributes of a given planet. They will record this dance, add the elements of music as well as props & background images for the final touches in their video.
  • Galaxy Painting: Students will create a glowing galaxy visual representation of a specific type of galaxy.
  • Paintbrushes: Students will create a paintbrush using found materials to use as they create their glowing galaxy. The students should concentrate on the design of their paintbrush and how it will assist them in the brush strokes to best represent their type of galaxy.
  • Glowing Galaxy Painting: Students will create a glowing piece of art by painting a galaxy to represent the information they’ve accrued throughout the Activating Strategy as well as the design process.
  • Reflection Questions (both components): Students will use these questions to reflect on the important parts of the lessons. (See Downloads)

Appendix (See Downloads)

  • Written Reflection Sheet
  • Video Examples of Student Work
  • Photo Examples of Student Work

Credits

ArtsNow, Inc. and Bear Creek Middle School, Barrow County School System
Ideas contributed and edited by: Melissa Dittmar Joy, Shannon Mulkey, Ashley Bailey, Michele McClelland

Dance Component - Dancing with Planets

Science and Dance

Description

In this component, students will study the planets of our galaxy and create a choreography piece that represents their planet. Students will understand the elements of dance, specifically movement qualities and how they can be used to express ideas. The students will be given the opportunity to make connections between movement qualities of dance and the characteristics of planets. The final outcome of this project will be a short film in which the students record their planet dance and learn how to edit a video that has been recorded.

Learning Targets

“I Can…”

  • Compare and contrast the size of my chosen planet relative to the Earth
  • Compare and contrast the surface and atmospheric features of my chosen planet relative to Earth
  • Decipher the relative distance from the sun and my chosen planet
  • Examine the ability to support life on Earth to my chosen planet

Essential Questions

  • How does Earth compare to other planets in our solar system?
  • How can dance elements represent characteristics of planets through planned choreography?

Curriculum Standards

S6E1. Students will explore current scientific views of the universe and how those views evolved.

  1. Compare and contrast the planets in terms of size relative to the earth, surface and atmospheric features, relative distance from the sun, ability to support life

Arts Standards

DMSPFD.2. Understands and models dance etiquette as a classroom participant, performer, and observer

DMSPCR.1. Demonstrates an understanding of creative and choreographic principles, processes, and structures

DMSPCR.2. Demonstrates an understanding of dance as a way to create and communicate meaning

DMSPRE.1. Demonstrates critical and creative thinking in all aspects of dance

Content Vocabulary

  • Planet
  • Gravity
  • Solar system
  • Relative size
  • Relative distance
  • Atmospheric features
  • Orbit
  • Ellipses
  • Dwarf planet
  • Planetary motion
  • Inertia
  • Gravitational attraction

Arts Vocabulary

  • Locomotor: a movement that travels through space
  • Non-locomotor: a movement that does not travel through space
  • Levels: one of the aspects of the movement element space; in dance there are 3 basic levels - high, middle and low
  • Pathways: the designs traced on the floor as a dancer travels across space; the designs traced in the air as a dancer moves various body parts
  • Shapes: an interesting and interrelated arrangement of body parts of one dancer; the visual makeup or molding of the body parts of a single dancer; the overall visible appearance of a group of dancers
  • Movement qualities: Percussive, vibratory, swinging, sustained, suspended

Use of Technology

  • Green Screen Technology
  • Video Camera
  • Video Editing Software, such as iMovie

Formative Assessment

  • Teacher led questioning through activating strategy and main activity.

Summative Assessment

  • Planet Movement Video

Materials

Video camera, recording device, “green” screen, selections of music pieces/songs, various prop materials, chart paper, notebook paper, writing instruments

Activating Strategy (5-10 min)

  • Explore movement qualities of dance through a warm-up, concentrating on the following elements of dance: level, space, shape, pathways, and movement qualities.

Main Activity

Part 1:

  • Students will identify characteristics of planets. When they identify an attribute they will perform a movement or action to represent it non verbally. (This will set the tone for this project.)

Part 2:

  • Students select a planet/group.
  • Students will begin to research their planets.

Part 3:

  • With their partner, students will discuss characteristics/attributes of their assigned/selected planet that they are going to represent through their choreography.
  • Students will begin to choreograph their planet dance. Remind the students to think about the elements of dance that they learned about during the Activating Strategy.
  • Students must select music (from given choices) that also represents the feeling/mood/attributes of their planet.

Part 4:

  • Utilizing costuming and props, students will create a choreographic work to represent their planet.
  • Choreography will be recorded in front of a green screen.
  • Students must select visual images of their planet to be placed in edited work.
  • Students will edit their film using iMovie or a similar type of software.
  • Students will add their selected musical pieces along with the background images for the final touch.

Part 5:

  • When all films have been completed have a film screening session in order for the groups to share their films.

Classroom Tips:

  • Student groups will need space to work, plan and choreograph.
  • Give them the dimension of the screen or camera reach before planning begins.
  • There will be noise, but understand this should be on-task “chatter.”
  • Some groups will need more guidance than others in getting ideas together.

Reflective Questions

  • What dance elements did you use to represent size, features, distance, and life? How do they represent these things for your planet?
  • What background image and music did you choose? Why?
  • What movement choices did you make and why- what were they representing?
  • Why did you choose that costume, prop, music, etc.?
  • How did you make your decisions, what changes occurred in the choreographic process?

Differentiation

Below Grade Level/EL Students:

  • Create a class work on one selected planet, remove options for self-selection of music, props, and costumes.

Above Grade Level:

  • Add in additional elements/requirements. Add another planet to be represented in complete work and relationship between the two planets also must be represented in choreography.

Additional Resources

  • Pictures and images of planets’ surface, atmosphere, colors to help ignite ideas
  • Gustov’s “The Planets” (piece of music)

Books

  • Astronomy in the Real World by Susan E. Haman
  • Beyond the Solar System: Exploring Galaxies, Black Holes, Alien Planets, and More: A History with 21 Activities by Mary Kay Carson
  • The Milky Way and Beyond: Stars, Nebulae, and Other Galaxies by Explorer’s Guide to the Universe/Erik Gregersen
  • Galaxies by Howard K. Trammel
  • 20 Fun Facts about Galaxies by Michael Sabatino
  • A Trip through the Milky Way by Heather Moore Niver

Appendix (See Downloads)

  • Written Reflection Sheet
  • Video examples of student work

Credits

Visual Arts Component - Glowing Galaxies Design Challenge

Science and Visual Arts

Description

In this arts integrated component, students will create a visual representation of a glowing galaxy using paintbrushes that they create from everyday materials. Students will identify three types of galaxies found in our universe. Students will also describe the shapes and colors of these galaxies, understanding the reasons behind the shape and color of the galaxy.

Learning Targets

“I Can…”

  • Identify the types of galaxies found in the universe
  • Describe the Milky Way galaxy and where our solar system is located within that galaxy
  • Distinguish the shape and color of different types of galaxies
  • Use the design process to create experimental paintbrushes
  • Identify the elements of art and principles of design in photographs of galaxies

Essential Questions

  • How can we create a visual representation of the different types of galaxies?
  • How can we use experimental design to create paintbrushes that represent the characteristics of the galaxies?

Curriculum Standards

S6E1. Students will explore current scientific views of the universe and how those views evolved.

  1. Relate the Nature of Science to the progression of basic historical scientific models (geocentric, heliocentric) as they describe our solar system, and the Big Bang as it describes the formation of the universe
  2. Describe the position of the solar system in the Milky Way galaxy and the universe

Arts Standards

VA6MC.2. Identifies and works to solve visual problems through creative thinking, planning, and/or experimenting with art materials, tools and techniques

VA6PR.1. Understands and applies media, techniques, and processes

VA6PR.2. Creates artwork reflecting a range of concepts, ideas, and subject matter

Content Vocabulary

  • Universe
  • Galaxy
  • Milky Way
  • Solar System
  • Spiral Galaxy
  • Elliptical Galaxy

Arts Vocabulary

  • Design process: to plan and make decisions about something that is being built or created
  • Brushstroke: the configuration given to paint by contact with the bristles of a brush
  • Light spectrum: the group of colors that a ray of light can be separated into including red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet: the colors that can be seen in a rainbow
  • Black light: invisible ultraviolet light, a lamp that radiates black light
  • Line: an element of art which refers to the continuous mark made on some surface by a moving point
  • Shape: an enclosed space defined by other elements of art
  • Form: an element of art that is three-dimensional and encloses volume (cubes, spheres, and cylinders are examples of various forms)
  • Color: an element of art with three properties 1) hue, the name of the color 2) intensity or the purity and strength of the color such as brightness or dullness 3) value, or the lightness or darkness of the color
  • Space: refers to the distance or area between, around, above or within things
  • Movement: associated with rhythm and refers to the arrangement of parts in an artwork that creates a sense of motion to the viewer’s eye through the work
  • Proportion: refers to the relationships of the size of objects in a body of work
  • Balance: a sense of stability in the body of work
  • Harmony: this is achieved in a body of work by using similar elements throughout the work
  • Unity: this is seen in a painting or drawing when all the parts equal a whole

Use of Technology

  • Design Process/Makerspace
  • Computer, internet, projector

Formative Assessment

  • Teacher led questioning through Activating Strategy and Main Activity

Summative Assessment

  • Galaxy painting
  • Paint brushes
  • Reflection Questions (see downloads)

Materials

  • White cardstock, paper clips, string, toothpicks, yarn, binder clips, corks, scrap paper, clothes pins, cardboard, paper plates
  • Black lights (the link provided below is one option from which to order black lights)
  • Fluorescent paint (the link provided below is one option from which to order fluorescent paint)

Activating Strategy (5-10 min)

  • Project NASA photographs of galaxies onto whiteboard:
  • Discuss the characteristics of galaxies using the Elements of Art and Principles of Design.
  • Compare and Contrast different types of galaxies.

Guiding Questions:

  • Look closely, What do you notice about these photographs?
  • What can we learn from them?
  • Using your background knowledge of galaxies, where is the light coming from?
  • Do you notice a pattern in the images?
  • How do you think these photographs were taken?
  • If you were asked to recreate this photograph as a painting what type of brushstrokes would you use? What color choices would you make?

Instructional Videos

Main Activity

PROCESS:

  • Students decide what type of Galaxy to paint.
  • Pass out materials for paint brushes.
  • Pass out White paper for paint.
  • Have black lights off, but accessible.

Part 1: Design Challenge

  • Introduce students to the Design process.
  • Students are instructed to choose a galaxy to represent in a painting based off of their knowledge and the NASA images. Give students time to brainstorm ideas on paper or in small groups.
  • Students are challenged to think about what kind of paintbrush they would need to create the specific brushstrokes to best represent their type of galaxy.
  • Students are presented with everyday materials and found/recycled objects.
  • Students may work alone or in small groups to create 3 paintbrushes each.
  • Allow approximately 15 minutes.

Instructional Videos

Part 2: Glowing Galaxy Painting

  • Distribute the black lights around the room.
  • Portion the neon paint onto paper plates. Distribute cups of water and paper towels.
  • Give each student a piece of paper.
  • Explain the process: Students will use their handmade paint brushes to create a galaxy.
  • Some paintbrushes may work better than others. The goal is to create a visual representation of a specific type of galaxy.
  • Turn off the overhead lights and turn on the blacklights.
  • What do you notice about the paint?
  • Allow approximately 25-30 minutes.

Instructional Videos

Reflection:

  • How did working in the black light inspire your work?
  • Which of your paintbrushes worked best and why?
  • How did you use problem solving skills to complete your painting?
  • Compare and contrast your painting viewed under black light and regular classroom lights.

Instructional Videos

Classroom Tips:

  • If carpeted room, put down drop cloths or newspaper for painting.
  • Room with no windows works great!

Reflection Questions

  • What brush worked the best? Why?
  • What did you change or improve on your brush while you were painting?
  • What object helped you create the effect you needed for your type of galaxy?

Differentiation

Below Grade Level/EL Students:

  • Lead students in a directed painting exercise. All students will be painting the same type of galaxy. Give students step by step instructions, including color suggestions and specific brushstrokes. The galaxy may be painted with a standard paintbrush.

Above Grade Level:

  • Ask students to pay close attention to the positive and negative space of the painting, noting the areas where the light shines the brightest. Ask students to visually define the specific characteristics of their galaxy painting. (i.e. Spiral galaxies are known for black holes, radiating arms and bulges.)

Additional Resources

Books

  • Our Solar System by Seymour Simon
  • A Trip through the Milky Way by Heather Moore Niver
  • Planetary Motion by Andrew P. Karam
  • The Planets [The definitive visual guide to our solar system] by Ben Morgan
  • Neptune by Ruth Owen
  • Uranus by Ruth Owen
  • Jupiter by Ruth Owen
  • Mars by Linda T. Elkins-Tanton
  • Mercury by L.H. Colligan

Appendix (See Downloads)

  • Written Reflection Sheet
  • Photo examples of student work

Credits

Grade 6: Astronomy

Additional Resources

Instructional Videos

Books

  • Astronomy in the Real World by Susan E. Haman
  • Beyond the Solar System: Exploring Galaxies, Black Holes, Alien Planets, and More: A History with 21 Activities by Mary Kay Carson
  • The Milky Way and Beyond: Stars, Nebulae, and Other Galaxies by Explorer’s Guide to the Universe/Erik Gregersen
  • Galaxies by Howard K. Trammel
  • 20 Fun Facts about Galaxies by Michael Sabatino
  • A Trip through the Milky Way by Heather Moore Niver
  • Our Solar System by Seymour Simon
  • A Trip through the Milky Way by Heather Moore Niver
  • Planetary Motion by Andrew P. Karam
  • The Planets [The definitive visual guide to our solar system] by Ben Morgan
  • Neptune by Ruth Owen
  • Uranus by Ruth Owen
  • Jupiter by Ruth Owen
  • Mars by Linda T. Elkins-Tanton
  • Mercury by L.H. Colligan

Grade 6:
Circuitry

CIRCUITRY

Grade 6: Circuitry

Unit Description

In this arts integrated unit, students will use movement and the creation of human circuits to aid in the comprehension of the direct purposes of conductors, insulators and electric circuits. Students will be able to identify and articulate the two types of simple circuits (parallel & series) and how they work. Students will be actively engaged in the discovery of the upcycling movement. Students will design, sew, and create an outfit that contains a sewn circuit that lights up an LED. The culmination of the project will be a school-wide fashion show in which students will debut their wearable circuitry fashions.

Unit Essential Questions

  • How can dance/movement aid in the comprehension of conductors, insulators and electric circuits?
  • How can knowledge of the upcycle movement assist in the creation of wearable circuits?

Real World Context

The fundamental process that is used on an everyday basis in our daily lives to turn on and off light switches may be basic, however it is the idea of circuitry that we truly depend on. When a computer, television, or any other household electronic device is in use, circuitry is involved. Being able to understand the loop that is created in order for electricity to power such devices is important for students to understand as our world continues to depend on electricity.

Cross-Cutting Interdisciplinary Concepts

Relationships
Simple communication of ideas
Mutual integration of concepts

Table Of Contents

Project 1: Human Circuits
Project 2: Wearable Circuits

Standards

Curriculum Standards

S5P3. Students will investigate electricity, magnetism, and their relationship.

  1. Investigate static electricity.
  2. Determine the necessary components for completing an electric circuit.
  3. Investigate common materials to determine if they are insulators or conductors of electricity.

S8P5. Students will recognize characteristics of gravity, electricity, and magnetism as major kinds of forces acting in nature.

  1. Demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of series and parallel circuits and how they transfer energy.

National Standards:

MS-PS2-3. Ask questions about data to determine the factors that affect the strength of electric and magnetic forces. [Clarification Statement: Examples of devices that use electric and magnetic forces could include electromagnets, electric motors, or generators. Examples of data could include the effect of the number of turns of wire on the strength of an electromagnet, or the effect of increasing the number or strength of magnets on the speed of an electric motor.]

Arts Standards

DMSPCR.1 Demonstrates an understanding of creative and choreographic principles, processes, and structures.

DMSPCR.2. Demonstrates an understanding of dance as a way to create and communicate meaning.

VA6MC.1. Engages in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas.

VA6MC.2. Identifies and works to solve visual problems through creative thinking, planning, and/or experimenting with art materials, tools, and techniques.

VA6CU.2. Investigates and discovers personal relationship to community, culture, and the world through making and studying art.

VA6PR.2. Creates artwork reflecting a range of concepts, ideas, and subject matter.

National Standards:

DA:Cr1.1.6.a. Relate similar or contrasting ideas to develop choreography using a variety of stimuli (for example, music, observed dance, literary forms, notation, natural phenomena, personal experience/recall, current news or social events).

Standard 1: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.
VA:Cr1.1.6a. Combine concepts collaboratively to generate innovative ideas for creating art.

Standard 4: Select, analyze, and interpret artistic work for presentation.
VA:Pr4.1.6a. Analyze similarities and differences associated with preserving and presenting two-dimensional, three-dimensional, and digital artwork.

Character Education

Components

The concept of how electricity moves fluidly via circuits is a perfect example of the concept of being a mindful student/human being.
Mindfulness helps us calm down, and thus, in turn, calms the amygdala, which allows the informational flow to the prefrontal cortex. (The part of our brain that helps us make decisions.) When we are mindful our brain uses a type of circuitry. The amygdala tries to protect us, but often mistakes stress for real threats and in turn stops the prefrontal cortex from getting the information it needs to help us make good choices. When the amygdala is calm, it gives the prefrontal cortex what it needs. The prefrontal cortex’s role is to help us figure things out in order to make well balanced choices. The prefrontal cortex also sends and retrieves memories to and from the hippocampus. When the amygdala is upset, the prefrontal cortex cannot help us. The hippocampus stores and recalls all of our memories. When the amygdala is upset, the hippocampus is unable to store memories or properly bring them to mind. Learning how to be a more mindful person will be useful in many aspects of our daily lives.

Attributes

Personal Responsibility

  • Being responsible for tasks that have been assigned.

Being Mindful

  • When we are able to be calm, we can easily make better choices.

Team Work

  • Having an open mind and being a good listener while working in a group situation.

Summative Assessments

  • Reflection Questions (both components): Students will use these questions to reflect on the important parts of the lessons. (See Downloads)
  • Parallel Circuit Dance/Movement: Students will show their understanding of elements of a parallel circuit through dance/movement.
  • Representations of Parallel & Series Circuits: Students will create representations of parallel and series circuits, identifying the parts that make up that circuit. Students could use any medium to demonstrate this knowledge. For example, poster, ThingLink, Google Presentation, etc.
  • Wearable Circuits Fashion Show: Students will assign roles within the group to produce a student run fashion show for their school community. Roles include: models, students will model the outfits in the “runway;” stylists, students that will get the clothing and models prepared for the “runway;” and an “MC,” a student who will introduce the models and the clothing to the audience.

Appendix (See Project Downloads)

  • Pre/Post Assessment
  • Written Reflection Sheet

Credits

ArtsNow, Inc. and Bear Creek Middle School, Barrow County School System
Ideas contributed and edited by: Ashley Bailey, Melissa Dittmar Joy, Shannon Green, Michele McClelland

Dance Component - Human Circuits

Science and Dance

Description

In this arts integrated unit, students will use movement and the creation of human circuits to aid in the comprehension of conductors, insulators and electric circuits.

Learning Targets

“I Can…”

  • Classify materials as conductors or insulators of electricity when placed within a circuit
  • Construct series and parallel circuits to demonstrate the flow of energy within a closed system

Essential Question(s)

  • How can dance/movement aid in the comprehension of conductors, insulators and electric circuits?

Curriculum Standards

S5P3. Students will investigate electricity, magnetism, and their relationship.

  1. Investigate static electricity.
  2. Determine the necessary components for completing an electric circuit.
  3. Investigate common materials to determine if they are insulators or conductors of electricity.

S8P5. Students will recognize characteristics of gravity, electricity, and magnetism as major kinds of forces acting in nature.

  1. Demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of series and parallel circuits and how they transfer energy.

National Standards

MS-PS2-3. Ask questions about data to determine the factors that affect the strength of electric and magnetic forces. [Clarification Statement: Examples of devices that use electric and magnetic forces could include electromagnets, electric motors, or generators. Examples of data could include the effect of the number of turns of wire on the strength of an electromagnet, or the effect of increasing the number or strength of magnets on the speed of an electric motor.]

Arts Standards

DMSPCR.1. Demonstrates an understanding of creative and choreographic principles, processes, and structures.

DMSPCR.2. Demonstrates an understanding of dance as a way to create and communicate meaning.

National Standards

DA:Cr1.1.6.

  1. Relate similar or contrasting ideas to develop choreography using a variety of stimuli (for example, music, observed dance, literary forms, notation, natural phenomena, personal experience/recall, current news or social events).

Content Vocabulary

  • Resistor
  • Conductor
  • Insulator
  • Wire
  • Energy source
  • Closed circuit
  • Open circuit
  • Series circuit
  • Parallel circuit
  • Current
  • Ohm’s Law (extension)

Arts Vocabulary

  • Levels: This is one of the aspects of the movement element space. In dance there are 3 basic levels: high, middle and low.

Technology Integration

  • Green Screen
  • Video Camera
  • iMovie or other video editing software with green screen capabilities

Formative Assessment

  • Observe students correctly “building” circuit types.
  • Observe students correctly identifying circuit types and components.

Summative Assessment

  • Students show their understanding of elements of a parallel circuit through dance/movement.
  • Reflection Questions (see Downloads)

Materials

Music, music player, camera, green screen, video editing software, Elements of Circuits Index Cards (see Downloads)

Activating Strategy (5-10 min)

  • Set up parameters for acceptable movement choices.
  • Discuss audience behavior/etiquette.
  • Students will participate in The Name Game.
  • Have the group form a circle.
  • Pick a person to go first and have them say their name while making a movement or gesture to accompany their name. (Examples: using your hands and figures to create a heart, using jazz hands, doing a curtsy…)
  • The circle then collectively repeats the person's name and gesture.
  • Continue with the next person stating their name and making a gesture.
  • The circle repeats the new person's name and gesture.
  • Then, starting with the person of origin, repeat all the names and gestures shared to that point.
  • Continue until everyone in the circle is included.

Main Activity

Part 1:

  • As a large group, play “Pass the Movement:”
    1. Gather students in a circle. Students will choose a movement that transfers energy, they gather the energy and send it out to another person, sending the energy…Throwing a ball and the person next to them catches the ball. Or kicking a ball, or a person using their arms in a volleyball hitting gesture, etc.)
    2. Begin with the student to your right. About halfway through the circle go ahead and allow the movement to be passed either to the left or the right. Their movement energizes the next person after they get the feeling of what is being passed.
    3. Lastly, the students choose a movement and pass their energy to anyone in the circle. As an extension, have students add examples insulators and conductors to Pass the Movement as a valuable review.
  • Discuss different types of circuits and the parts needed to build the circuit.
  • Explore building human electrical circuits.
  • Break students into groups.
  • Assign roles for each element of a circuit by passing out the Elements of Circuits Index Cards (see Downloads)
  • In groups, students will create a dancing circuit utilizing all the necessary components.
  • Students will perform for the whole group.
  • Audience will identify circuit type and which dancer(s) were representing each component.

Part 2:

  • Students will receive feedback of group performance from the audience using the Glow & Grow Feedback Form. (see Downloads)
  • The teacher will compile the feedback for the groups from the Glow & Grow Feedback Forms.
  • Each group will look at the feedback forms and polish their dance to make it more clear for the audience.
  • Each group will select music to dance to (instrumental music is encouraged).
  • Each group will film the dance in front of the green screen.
  • Groups will upload their video to iMovie and select a background image to represent their idea for their parallel circuit dance.
  • Videos will be presented to an audience (online, in person, etc.) (See Additional Resources for video examples of student work.)

Reflective Questions

  • Identify the elements of a circuit that appeared in your dance. How did the movement relate to the element of the circuit?
  • What happens to the flow of electricity if the circuit is not complete? How do you know? Does it matter where the break in the circuit is?

Additional Resources

Books

  • Make: Electronics: Learning Through Discovery by Charles Platt
  • Electronics for Kids: Play with Simple Circuits and Experiment with Electricity! by Oyvind Nydal Dahl
  • DK Eyewitness Books: Electricity Hardcover by Steve Parker

Websites

Appendix (See Downloads)

  • Elements of Circuits Index Cards
  • Glow & Grow Feedback Form
  • Reflection Questions

Credits

Visual Arts Component - Glowing Galaxies Design Challenge

Science and Visual Arts

Description

In this arts integrated component, students will create a visual representation of a glowing galaxy using paintbrushes that they create from everyday materials. Students will identify three types of galaxies found in our universe. Students will also describe the shapes and colors of these galaxies, understanding the reasons behind the shape and color of the galaxy.

Learning Targets

“I Can…”

  • Classify materials as conductors or insulators of electricity when placed within a circuit
  • Identify the evidence of energy transformations that occur in electrical circuits
  • Explain electrical energy as the movement of electrons
  • Construct basic electric circuits
  • Determine if a circuit is open or closed
  • Define and identify basic circuit elements and their symbols: battery, wire, resistor, and bulb
  • Differentiate between series and parallel circuits
  • Work with a team to create an upcycled outfit
  • Map out a working circuit on paper
  • Use a LilyPad Arduino to sew working circuits into my fashions

Essential Questions

  • How does an electric circuit work?
  • How does energy travel along a circuit?
  • What makes a good design?
  • How do technology and the fashion world intersect?

Curriculum Standards

S8P5. Students will recognize characteristics of gravity, electricity, and magnetism as major kinds of forces acting in nature.

  1. Demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of series and parallel circuits and how they transfer energy.

S5P3. Students will investigate electricity, magnetism, and their relationship.

  1. Determine the necessary components for completing an electric circuit.

Arts Standards

VA6MC.1. Engages in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas.

VA6MC.2. Identifies and works to solve visual problems through creative thinking, planning, and/or experimenting with art materials, tools and techniques.

VA6CU.2. Investigates and discovers personal relationship to community, culture, and the world through making and studying art.

VA6PR.2. Creates artwork reflecting a range of concepts, ideas, and subject matter.

National Standards:

Visual Arts

Standard 1: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work. VA:Cr1.1.6a. Combine concepts collaboratively to generate innovative ideas for creating art.

Standard 4: Select, analyze, and interpret artistic work for presentation. VA:Pr4.1.6a. Analyze similarities and differences associated with preserving and presenting two-dimensional, three-dimensional, and digital artwork.

Content Vocabulary

  • Resistor
  • Conductor
  • Insulator
  • Closed circuit
  • Open circuit
  • Series circuit
  • Parallel circuit
  • Current
  • Ohm’s Law (extension)

Arts Vocabulary

  • Upcycling: when an old item that was intended for one purpose is turned into something new
  • LilyPad Arduino: a microcontroller used to build circuits
  • Conductive thread: stainless steel thread that conducts electricity
  • LED: a light-emitting diode (LED) is a two-lead semiconductor light source

Technology Integration

  • ThingLink
  • Google Presentation
  • PowerPoint on smartboard (see downloads)
  • Sewing machines in Makerspace
  • 3D printer
  • LilyPad Arduino or LilyTwinkle

Formative Assessment

  • Students will check in with their design plan throughout their process.
  • Students will trouble shoot circuits that are not working using their knowledge of circuitry and the nature of electricity.

Summative Assessment

  • Student-created representations of parallel and series circuits identifying the parts that make up that circuit. Students could use any medium to demonstrate this knowledge. For example: poster, ThingLink, Google Presentation, etc.
  • Students will assign roles within the group to produce a student-run fashion show for their school community. Roles include: models, students who will model the outfits on the “runway;” stylists, students who will get the clothing and models prepared for the “runway;” and an “MC,” a student who will introduce the models and the clothing to the audience.

Materials

  • A big pile of clothing to be upcycled! (This can be sourced from your classroom and school community.) LilyPad Arduino or LilyTwinkle https://www.sparkfun.com/; conductive thread, basic sewing supplies for non-conductive areas, scissors, assorted thread, needles in various sizes, glue gun, pins

Activating Strategy (5-10 min)

Main Activity

Part 1:

  • Discuss types of circuits.
  • Discuss elements of each type of circuit.
  • Illustrate a circuit.

Part 2:

  • Students will work within a design team to develop a brand identity and concept for their collection. The collection must tell a story. This line of questioning will help students to develop a design plan.
  • Who is the character that will be wearing your outfit?
  • In what setting is your look being worn?
  • What mood does your outfit portray?
  • What story does your collection tell?
  • Introduce the materials available for upcycling and allow time for groups to sketch and experiment.
  • Introduction to E textiles is a great attachment that provides useful tips for teachers. (See Downloads)

Part 3:

  • Ask teams to map out the path of the circuit components onto their design sketch, labeling the positive and negative paths. This will serve as a sewing guide.
  • Introduce basic sewing techniques and tools including sewing machines if available.
  • Make it work! Encourage students to create their upcycled outfits outlined in their design plan.
  • Post the design thinking chart to encourage students to redesign and troubleshoot if needed.
  • This will take several sessions. Encourage students to give each other feedback and stay flexible. This is the fun part!

Part 4:

  • Plan a Fashion Show for the grade level or the school community.

Reflection Questions

  • In modern homes, do you think parallel or series circuits are used? Explain your reasoning.
  • Does your collection reflect your brand and story?
  • What role did teamwork play in your project?
  • Were you flexible with your vision? If so, how did your collection change?
  • What did you learn about circuits that you did not know before?
  • What surprised you about the project?

Differentiation

Accelerated

Remedial:

Additional Resources

Books

  • Make: Electronics: Learning Through Discovery by Charles Platt
  • Electronics for Kids: Play with Simple Circuits and Experiment with Electricity! by Oyvind Nydal Dahl
  • DK Eyewitness Books: Electricity Hardcover by Steve Parker

Video examples of student work

Appendix (See Downloads)

  • Circuits-Upcycle PowerPoint
  • The Design Thinking Process
  • Introduction to E-textiles
  • Written Reflection Sheet

Credits

Grade 6: Circuitry

Additional Resources

Books

  • Make: Electronics: Learning Through Discovery by Charles Platt
  • Electronics for Kids: Play with Simple Circuits and Experiment with Electricity! by Oyvind Nydal Dahl
  • DK Eyewitness Books: Electricity Hardcover by Steve Parker

Websites

Video Examples of Student Work
Photo Examples of Student Work