CIRCUITRY

Grade 6: Circuitry

Unit Description

In this arts integrated unit, students will use movement and the creation of human circuits to aid in the comprehension of the direct purposes of conductors, insulators and electric circuits. Students will be able to identify and articulate the two types of simple circuits (parallel & series) and how they work. Students will be actively engaged in the discovery of the upcycling movement. Students will design, sew, and create an outfit that contains a sewn circuit that lights up an LED. The culmination of the project will be a school-wide fashion show in which students will debut their wearable circuitry fashions.

Unit Essential Questions

  • How can dance/movement aid in the comprehension of conductors, insulators and electric circuits?
  • How can knowledge of the upcycle movement assist in the creation of wearable circuits?

Real World Context

The fundamental process that is used on an everyday basis in our daily lives to turn on and off light switches may be basic, however it is the idea of circuitry that we truly depend on. When a computer, television, or any other household electronic device is in use, circuitry is involved. Being able to understand the loop that is created in order for electricity to power such devices is important for students to understand as our world continues to depend on electricity.

Cross-Cutting Interdisciplinary Concepts

Relationships
Simple communication of ideas
Mutual integration of concepts

Table Of Contents

Project 1: Human Circuits
Project 2: Wearable Circuits

Standards

Curriculum Standards

S5P3. Students will investigate electricity, magnetism, and their relationship.

  1. Investigate static electricity.
  2. Determine the necessary components for completing an electric circuit.
  3. Investigate common materials to determine if they are insulators or conductors of electricity.

S8P5. Students will recognize characteristics of gravity, electricity, and magnetism as major kinds of forces acting in nature.

  1. Demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of series and parallel circuits and how they transfer energy.

National Standards:

MS-PS2-3. Ask questions about data to determine the factors that affect the strength of electric and magnetic forces. [Clarification Statement: Examples of devices that use electric and magnetic forces could include electromagnets, electric motors, or generators. Examples of data could include the effect of the number of turns of wire on the strength of an electromagnet, or the effect of increasing the number or strength of magnets on the speed of an electric motor.]

Arts Standards

DMSPCR.1 Demonstrates an understanding of creative and choreographic principles, processes, and structures.

DMSPCR.2. Demonstrates an understanding of dance as a way to create and communicate meaning.

VA6MC.1. Engages in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas.

VA6MC.2. Identifies and works to solve visual problems through creative thinking, planning, and/or experimenting with art materials, tools, and techniques.

VA6CU.2. Investigates and discovers personal relationship to community, culture, and the world through making and studying art.

VA6PR.2. Creates artwork reflecting a range of concepts, ideas, and subject matter.

National Standards:

DA:Cr1.1.6.a. Relate similar or contrasting ideas to develop choreography using a variety of stimuli (for example, music, observed dance, literary forms, notation, natural phenomena, personal experience/recall, current news or social events).

Standard 1: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.
VA:Cr1.1.6a. Combine concepts collaboratively to generate innovative ideas for creating art.

Standard 4: Select, analyze, and interpret artistic work for presentation.
VA:Pr4.1.6a. Analyze similarities and differences associated with preserving and presenting two-dimensional, three-dimensional, and digital artwork.

Character Education

Components

The concept of how electricity moves fluidly via circuits is a perfect example of the concept of being a mindful student/human being.
Mindfulness helps us calm down, and thus, in turn, calms the amygdala, which allows the informational flow to the prefrontal cortex. (The part of our brain that helps us make decisions.) When we are mindful our brain uses a type of circuitry. The amygdala tries to protect us, but often mistakes stress for real threats and in turn stops the prefrontal cortex from getting the information it needs to help us make good choices. When the amygdala is calm, it gives the prefrontal cortex what it needs. The prefrontal cortex’s role is to help us figure things out in order to make well balanced choices. The prefrontal cortex also sends and retrieves memories to and from the hippocampus. When the amygdala is upset, the prefrontal cortex cannot help us. The hippocampus stores and recalls all of our memories. When the amygdala is upset, the hippocampus is unable to store memories or properly bring them to mind. Learning how to be a more mindful person will be useful in many aspects of our daily lives.

Attributes

Personal Responsibility

  • Being responsible for tasks that have been assigned.

Being Mindful

  • When we are able to be calm, we can easily make better choices.

Team Work

  • Having an open mind and being a good listener while working in a group situation.

Summative Assessments

  • Reflection Questions (both components): Students will use these questions to reflect on the important parts of the lessons. (See Downloads)
  • Parallel Circuit Dance/Movement: Students will show their understanding of elements of a parallel circuit through dance/movement.
  • Representations of Parallel & Series Circuits: Students will create representations of parallel and series circuits, identifying the parts that make up that circuit. Students could use any medium to demonstrate this knowledge. For example, poster, ThingLink, Google Presentation, etc.
  • Wearable Circuits Fashion Show: Students will assign roles within the group to produce a student run fashion show for their school community. Roles include: models, students will model the outfits in the “runway;” stylists, students that will get the clothing and models prepared for the “runway;” and an “MC,” a student who will introduce the models and the clothing to the audience.

Appendix (See Project Downloads)

  • Pre/Post Assessment
  • Written Reflection Sheet

Credits

ArtsNow, Inc. and Bear Creek Middle School, Barrow County School System
Ideas contributed and edited by: Ashley Bailey, Melissa Dittmar Joy, Shannon Green, Michele McClelland

Dance Component - Human Circuits

Science and Dance

Description

In this arts integrated unit, students will use movement and the creation of human circuits to aid in the comprehension of conductors, insulators and electric circuits.

Learning Targets

“I Can…”

  • Classify materials as conductors or insulators of electricity when placed within a circuit
  • Construct series and parallel circuits to demonstrate the flow of energy within a closed system

Essential Question(s)

  • How can dance/movement aid in the comprehension of conductors, insulators and electric circuits?

Curriculum Standards

S5P3. Students will investigate electricity, magnetism, and their relationship.

  1. Investigate static electricity.
  2. Determine the necessary components for completing an electric circuit.
  3. Investigate common materials to determine if they are insulators or conductors of electricity.

S8P5. Students will recognize characteristics of gravity, electricity, and magnetism as major kinds of forces acting in nature.

  1. Demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of series and parallel circuits and how they transfer energy.

National Standards

MS-PS2-3. Ask questions about data to determine the factors that affect the strength of electric and magnetic forces. [Clarification Statement: Examples of devices that use electric and magnetic forces could include electromagnets, electric motors, or generators. Examples of data could include the effect of the number of turns of wire on the strength of an electromagnet, or the effect of increasing the number or strength of magnets on the speed of an electric motor.]

Arts Standards

DMSPCR.1. Demonstrates an understanding of creative and choreographic principles, processes, and structures.

DMSPCR.2. Demonstrates an understanding of dance as a way to create and communicate meaning.

National Standards

DA:Cr1.1.6.

  1. Relate similar or contrasting ideas to develop choreography using a variety of stimuli (for example, music, observed dance, literary forms, notation, natural phenomena, personal experience/recall, current news or social events).

Content Vocabulary

  • Resistor
  • Conductor
  • Insulator
  • Wire
  • Energy source
  • Closed circuit
  • Open circuit
  • Series circuit
  • Parallel circuit
  • Current
  • Ohm’s Law (extension)

Arts Vocabulary

  • Levels: This is one of the aspects of the movement element space. In dance there are 3 basic levels: high, middle and low.

Technology Integration

  • Green Screen
  • Video Camera
  • iMovie or other video editing software with green screen capabilities

Formative Assessment

  • Observe students correctly “building” circuit types.
  • Observe students correctly identifying circuit types and components.

Summative Assessment

  • Students show their understanding of elements of a parallel circuit through dance/movement.
  • Reflection Questions (see Downloads)

Materials

Music, music player, camera, green screen, video editing software, Elements of Circuits Index Cards (see Downloads)

Activating Strategy (5-10 min)

  • Set up parameters for acceptable movement choices.
  • Discuss audience behavior/etiquette.
  • Students will participate in The Name Game.
  • Have the group form a circle.
  • Pick a person to go first and have them say their name while making a movement or gesture to accompany their name. (Examples: using your hands and figures to create a heart, using jazz hands, doing a curtsy…)
  • The circle then collectively repeats the person's name and gesture.
  • Continue with the next person stating their name and making a gesture.
  • The circle repeats the new person's name and gesture.
  • Then, starting with the person of origin, repeat all the names and gestures shared to that point.
  • Continue until everyone in the circle is included.

Main Activity

Part 1:

  • As a large group, play “Pass the Movement:”
    1. Gather students in a circle. Students will choose a movement that transfers energy, they gather the energy and send it out to another person, sending the energy…Throwing a ball and the person next to them catches the ball. Or kicking a ball, or a person using their arms in a volleyball hitting gesture, etc.)
    2. Begin with the student to your right. About halfway through the circle go ahead and allow the movement to be passed either to the left or the right. Their movement energizes the next person after they get the feeling of what is being passed.
    3. Lastly, the students choose a movement and pass their energy to anyone in the circle. As an extension, have students add examples insulators and conductors to Pass the Movement as a valuable review.
  • Discuss different types of circuits and the parts needed to build the circuit.
  • Explore building human electrical circuits.
  • Break students into groups.
  • Assign roles for each element of a circuit by passing out the Elements of Circuits Index Cards (see Downloads)
  • In groups, students will create a dancing circuit utilizing all the necessary components.
  • Students will perform for the whole group.
  • Audience will identify circuit type and which dancer(s) were representing each component.

Part 2:

  • Students will receive feedback of group performance from the audience using the Glow & Grow Feedback Form. (see Downloads)
  • The teacher will compile the feedback for the groups from the Glow & Grow Feedback Forms.
  • Each group will look at the feedback forms and polish their dance to make it more clear for the audience.
  • Each group will select music to dance to (instrumental music is encouraged).
  • Each group will film the dance in front of the green screen.
  • Groups will upload their video to iMovie and select a background image to represent their idea for their parallel circuit dance.
  • Videos will be presented to an audience (online, in person, etc.) (See Additional Resources for video examples of student work.)

Reflective Questions

  • Identify the elements of a circuit that appeared in your dance. How did the movement relate to the element of the circuit?
  • What happens to the flow of electricity if the circuit is not complete? How do you know? Does it matter where the break in the circuit is?

Additional Resources

Books

  • Make: Electronics: Learning Through Discovery by Charles Platt
  • Electronics for Kids: Play with Simple Circuits and Experiment with Electricity! by Oyvind Nydal Dahl
  • DK Eyewitness Books: Electricity Hardcover by Steve Parker

Websites

Appendix (See Downloads)

  • Elements of Circuits Index Cards
  • Glow & Grow Feedback Form
  • Reflection Questions

Credits

Visual Arts Component - Glowing Galaxies Design Challenge

Science and Visual Arts

Description

In this arts integrated component, students will create a visual representation of a glowing galaxy using paintbrushes that they create from everyday materials. Students will identify three types of galaxies found in our universe. Students will also describe the shapes and colors of these galaxies, understanding the reasons behind the shape and color of the galaxy.

Learning Targets

“I Can…”

  • Classify materials as conductors or insulators of electricity when placed within a circuit
  • Identify the evidence of energy transformations that occur in electrical circuits
  • Explain electrical energy as the movement of electrons
  • Construct basic electric circuits
  • Determine if a circuit is open or closed
  • Define and identify basic circuit elements and their symbols: battery, wire, resistor, and bulb
  • Differentiate between series and parallel circuits
  • Work with a team to create an upcycled outfit
  • Map out a working circuit on paper
  • Use a LilyPad Arduino to sew working circuits into my fashions

Essential Questions

  • How does an electric circuit work?
  • How does energy travel along a circuit?
  • What makes a good design?
  • How do technology and the fashion world intersect?

Curriculum Standards

S8P5. Students will recognize characteristics of gravity, electricity, and magnetism as major kinds of forces acting in nature.

  1. Demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of series and parallel circuits and how they transfer energy.

S5P3. Students will investigate electricity, magnetism, and their relationship.

  1. Determine the necessary components for completing an electric circuit.

Arts Standards

VA6MC.1. Engages in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas.

VA6MC.2. Identifies and works to solve visual problems through creative thinking, planning, and/or experimenting with art materials, tools and techniques.

VA6CU.2. Investigates and discovers personal relationship to community, culture, and the world through making and studying art.

VA6PR.2. Creates artwork reflecting a range of concepts, ideas, and subject matter.

National Standards:

Visual Arts

Standard 1: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work. VA:Cr1.1.6a. Combine concepts collaboratively to generate innovative ideas for creating art.

Standard 4: Select, analyze, and interpret artistic work for presentation. VA:Pr4.1.6a. Analyze similarities and differences associated with preserving and presenting two-dimensional, three-dimensional, and digital artwork.

Content Vocabulary

  • Resistor
  • Conductor
  • Insulator
  • Closed circuit
  • Open circuit
  • Series circuit
  • Parallel circuit
  • Current
  • Ohm’s Law (extension)

Arts Vocabulary

  • Upcycling: when an old item that was intended for one purpose is turned into something new
  • LilyPad Arduino: a microcontroller used to build circuits
  • Conductive thread: stainless steel thread that conducts electricity
  • LED: a light-emitting diode (LED) is a two-lead semiconductor light source

Technology Integration

  • ThingLink
  • Google Presentation
  • PowerPoint on smartboard (see downloads)
  • Sewing machines in Makerspace
  • 3D printer
  • LilyPad Arduino or LilyTwinkle

Formative Assessment

  • Students will check in with their design plan throughout their process.
  • Students will trouble shoot circuits that are not working using their knowledge of circuitry and the nature of electricity.

Summative Assessment

  • Student-created representations of parallel and series circuits identifying the parts that make up that circuit. Students could use any medium to demonstrate this knowledge. For example: poster, ThingLink, Google Presentation, etc.
  • Students will assign roles within the group to produce a student-run fashion show for their school community. Roles include: models, students who will model the outfits on the “runway;” stylists, students who will get the clothing and models prepared for the “runway;” and an “MC,” a student who will introduce the models and the clothing to the audience.

Materials

  • A big pile of clothing to be upcycled! (This can be sourced from your classroom and school community.) LilyPad Arduino or LilyTwinkle https://www.sparkfun.com/; conductive thread, basic sewing supplies for non-conductive areas, scissors, assorted thread, needles in various sizes, glue gun, pins

Activating Strategy (5-10 min)

Main Activity

Part 1:

  • Discuss types of circuits.
  • Discuss elements of each type of circuit.
  • Illustrate a circuit.

Part 2:

  • Students will work within a design team to develop a brand identity and concept for their collection. The collection must tell a story. This line of questioning will help students to develop a design plan.
  • Who is the character that will be wearing your outfit?
  • In what setting is your look being worn?
  • What mood does your outfit portray?
  • What story does your collection tell?
  • Introduce the materials available for upcycling and allow time for groups to sketch and experiment.
  • Introduction to E textiles is a great attachment that provides useful tips for teachers. (See Downloads)

Part 3:

  • Ask teams to map out the path of the circuit components onto their design sketch, labeling the positive and negative paths. This will serve as a sewing guide.
  • Introduce basic sewing techniques and tools including sewing machines if available.
  • Make it work! Encourage students to create their upcycled outfits outlined in their design plan.
  • Post the design thinking chart to encourage students to redesign and troubleshoot if needed.
  • This will take several sessions. Encourage students to give each other feedback and stay flexible. This is the fun part!

Part 4:

  • Plan a Fashion Show for the grade level or the school community.

Reflection Questions

  • In modern homes, do you think parallel or series circuits are used? Explain your reasoning.
  • Does your collection reflect your brand and story?
  • What role did teamwork play in your project?
  • Were you flexible with your vision? If so, how did your collection change?
  • What did you learn about circuits that you did not know before?
  • What surprised you about the project?

Differentiation

Accelerated

Remedial:

Additional Resources

Books

  • Make: Electronics: Learning Through Discovery by Charles Platt
  • Electronics for Kids: Play with Simple Circuits and Experiment with Electricity! by Oyvind Nydal Dahl
  • DK Eyewitness Books: Electricity Hardcover by Steve Parker

Video examples of student work

Appendix (See Downloads)

  • Circuits-Upcycle PowerPoint
  • The Design Thinking Process
  • Introduction to E-textiles
  • Written Reflection Sheet

Credits

Grade 6: Circuitry

Additional Resources

Books

  • Make: Electronics: Learning Through Discovery by Charles Platt
  • Electronics for Kids: Play with Simple Circuits and Experiment with Electricity! by Oyvind Nydal Dahl
  • DK Eyewitness Books: Electricity Hardcover by Steve Parker

Websites

Video Examples of Student Work
Photo Examples of Student Work

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