CLASSY CLASSIFICATION OF ARTSY ANIMALS

Grade 5: Classy Classification of Animals

Unit Description

In this unit, students will be exploring different methods of modeling animal classification using the arts. They will incorporate methods of visual arts, playwriting, and performing. There will be multiple opportunities for students to engage creatively and collaborate with peers.

Unit Essential Question

How can analyzing animal attributes in the animal classification system help us to understand their role in the ecosystem?

Real World Context

Scientists study and classify animals to gain a better understanding of their needs. Humans are classified as animals, and all animals are interdependent. Scientists need to understand animals to deal with issues such as endangered species, sickness, etc. Classification is important in general because it helps us to organize the world around us and draw meaningful conclusions about groups of things.

Cross-Cutting Interdisciplinary Concepts

Classifying

Projects

Project 1: Create-a-Critter
In this project, students will explore animal attributes by becoming inventive and creating a one-of-a-kind critter using the art technique of “exquisite corpse”.
The synthesis of knowledge of animal classification in this visual way is both engaging and memorable. Students will write a description of their critter detailing the characteristics of each animal group they integrated into their design. Students will name their animal and present their animal to the class via a “Wanted” poster.

Project 2: Playing with Animals
In this project, students will write a fictional play around the premise of a zookeeper trying to solve the problem of “the zoo just received several new animals and no one knows where each animal belongs”. The play will incorporate science content that will demonstrate student knowledge of animal classification. Students will also create 3-D masks to represent the animals in their play. To culminate this project, students will dramatize their play to an audience in order to express the inner workings of the animal classification system.

Project Essential Questions

PROJECT 1:

  • How can I apply my knowledge of animal classification to create a new critter using the “exquisite corpse” technique?

PROJECT 2:

  • How can I develop a play that illustrates how animals are sorted into groups?
  • How can I create a visual artwork that clearly articulates the characteristics of vertebrates?
  • How can dramatizing a play help me to communicate and model scientific concepts?

Standards

Curriculum Standards

S5L1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to group organisms using scientific classification procedures.

  1. Develop a model that illustrates how animals are sorted into groups (vertebrate and invertebrate) and how vertebrates are sorted into groups (fish, amphibian, reptile, bird, and mammal) using data from multiple sources.

ELACC5W3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

ELACC5W4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in Standards 1–3 above.)

ELAGSE5SL1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

Arts Standards

VA5MC.1 Engages in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas.

VA5PR.1 Creates artworks based on personal experience and selected themes.

VA5PR.2 Understands and applies media, techniques, and processes of two-dimensional art processes (drawing, painting, printmaking, mixed-media) using tools and materials in a safe and appropriate manner to develop skills.

VA5PR.3 Understands and applies media, techniques, and processes of three-dimensional works of art (e.g., ceramics, sculpture, crafts, mixed- media) using tools and materials in a safe and appropriate manner to develop skills.

  1. Creates 3-D artwork that demonstrates a design concept: open or closed form, proportion, balance, color scheme, and movement.

TAES5.2 Developing scripts through improvisation and other theatrical methods

  1. Uses a playwriting process (e.g., pre-write/pre-play; prepare to write/plan dramatization; write; dramatize; reflect and edit; re-write/play; publish/perform)
  2. Applies dramatic elements such as plot, point of view conflict, resolution, and significant events, in creating scripts
  3. Creates an organizing structure appropriate for purpose, audience and context

TAES5.3 Acting by developing, communicating, and sustaining roles within a variety of situations and environments

  1. Uses vocal elements such as inflection, pitch, and volume, to communicate the thoughts, emotions, and actions of a character
  2. Uses body and stage movement to communicate the thoughts, emotions, and actions of a character
  3. Uses imagination to make artistic choices in portraying characters
  4. Collaborates with an ensemble to create theatre
  5. Dramatizes literature and original scripts through various dramatic forms such as pantomime, process drama, puppetry, improvisation, plays, and readers’ theatre

Materials to be Purchased for this Unit

  • Rigid Wrap (plaster mesh)
  • small pans (for water for mesh wrap)
  • white face mask
  • tissue paper
  • feathers
  • faux animal fur sheets(or a bolt)
  • mesh netting
  • metallic paper(fish scales)
  • metallic paint(glossy finish to amphibian)
  • acrylic paint
  • safari hat for Zookeeper
  • GarageBand App
  • DoInk Greenscreen App
  • Textured plates
  • Art sticks

Character Education

Components
After completion of the “Playing with Animals” activity, the class can share the play with a first grade class and complete the reflection activity.

Character Attributes Addressed During Unit

  • Cooperation
  • Collaboration
  • Respect for Others

Partnering With Fine Arts Teachers

Visual Arts Teacher:

  • Mask making – helping with the making of the mask

Summative Assessments

  • Pre/ Post Test
  • Project 1 Rubric
  • Project 2 Rubric (Task A, B, & C)

Appendix (See Additional Resources)

  • Pretest/Post Test

Credits

Sarah Weiss, Virginia Diederich, Abby Hernandez, Edited by Jessica Espinoza, Edited by Dr. Carla Cohen

Create-a-Critter

Description

In this project, students will explore animal attributes by becoming inventive and creating a one-of-a-kind critter using the art technique of “exquisite corpse”.

The synthesis of knowledge of animal classification in this visual way is both engaging and memorable. Students will write a description of their critter detailing the characteristics of each animal group they integrated into their design. Students will name their animal and present their animal to the class via a “Wanted” poster.

Learning Targets

“I Can…”

  • Create a critter that integrates three different animal parts
  • Create an original name for my critter based upon the attributes
  • Create a “Wanted” poster for my unique critter that describes its animal characteristics

Essential Questions

  • How can I apply my knowledge of animal classification to create a new critter using the “exquisite corpse” technique?

Curriculum Standards

S5L1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to group organisms using scientific classification procedures.

  1. Develop a model that illustrates how animals are sorted into groups (vertebrate and invertebrate) and how vertebrates are sorted into groups (fish, amphibian, reptile, bird, and mammal) using data from multiple sources.

ELACC5W3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

ELACC5W4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in Standards 1–3 above.)

Arts Standards

VA5MC.1 Engages in the creative process to generate and visualize ideas.

VA5PR.1 Creates artworks based on personal experience and selected themes.

VA5PR.2 Understands and applies media, techniques, and processes of two-dimensional art processes (drawing, painting, printmaking, mixed-media) using tools and materials in a safe and appropriate manner to develop skills.

VA5PR.3 Understands and applies media, techniques, and processes of three-dimensional works of art (e.g., ceramics, sculpture, crafts, mixed- media) using tools and materials in a safe and appropriate manner to develop skills.

  1. Creates 3-D artwork that demonstrates a design concept: open or closed form, proportion, balance, color scheme, and movement.

Content Vocabulary

  • Vertebrate
  • Invertebrate
  • Mammal
  • Amphibian
  • Fish
  • Bird
  • Reptile
  • Insect
  • Classify
  • Group
  • Characteristics
  • Attribute
  • Similarities
  • Differences
  • Organism
  • Backbone
  • Warm-blooded
  • Cold-blooded
  • Reproduce

Arts Vocabulary

  • Surrealism: a 20th-century avant-garde movement in art and literature that sought to release the creative potential of the unconscious mind, for example by the irrational juxtaposition of images
  • Andre Breton: a Surrealist artist
  • Exquisite Corpse: a method by which a collection of words or images is collectively assembled (much like a collage)
  • Line: curves or marks that span a distance between two points
  • Texture: the feel, appearance, or consistency of a surface
  • Shape: the form of an object or its external boundary, outline, or external surface, as opposed to other properties such as color, texture or material composition
  • Space: any area that an artist provides for a particular purpose, this includes the background, foreground and middleground, and the distances or around, between, and within things
  • Subject Matter: the topic dealt with or the subject represented in a work of art

Technology Integration

Formative Assessment

  • Class discussion
  • Teacher should check in with small groups as they work on their critter
  • Questioning

Summative Assessment

  • Project Rubric for the “Wanted Poster”

Materials

  • Drawing paper
  • Paper and pencil
  • Textured plates
  • Art sticks
  • Black extra fine Sharpie markers
  • Examples of exquisite corpse drawings

Activating Strategy (5-10 min)

  • Show examples of exquisite corpse drawings (SEE DOWNLOADS)
  • Review characteristics/attributes of each vertebrate subgroup (bird, fish, mammal, amphibian, reptile)
  • Review procedures of working with groups and time constraints for the activity

Main Activity

Part 1:

  • Students will fold paper so that there are three vertical sections.
  • Each student will roll a die. They will draw the body part according to the number they roll:
    • 1= bird
    • 2 = fish
    • 3 = mammal
    • 4 = amphibian
    • 5 = reptile
    • 6 = invertebrate
  • After the first roll, student will draw the head of an example of that sub group. (e.g, if the teacher names mammal, the student could draw the head of a dog) on the top section.
  • After a specified amount of time, the student will fold the paper so that only the middle section is showing and pass to the next student. The students will again roll the die, and draw the torso of an animal that represents that sub group.
  • After a specified amount of time, the student will fold the paper so that only the bottom section is showing and pass to the next student. The students will again roll the die and draw the bottom (feet, tail) of an animal that represents that sub group.
  • The last student in the group will open the paper to reveal the three sections.

Part 2:

  • The student will take the created critter and develop a name for the critter using all three of the animals in the picture.
  • The student can now outline with Sharpies if desired, add color and an environmental background for the critter.
  • Each section of the critter should be finished using a different texture plate and art sticks (for example, the head could be one texture and one color, torso could be a different texture and color, etc.)
  • This paper can then be turned into a “wanted poster”. The student can write a description using some characteristics of all of the animal parts. (e.g. Be on the lookout for a missing “ligerdile” (lion, tiger, crocodile) that has escaped. It has fur, is warm blooded and might be near the eggs it laid. It was last seen…..)

Classroom Tips:

  • The teacher might want to have the student monitor each other so that they do not draw the same animal on the paper, even if they draw the same group.
  • Encourage students to consider placement and size of each body part; center each part; draw large enough to show texture and details, etc.
  • The teacher should emphasize that while the drawing does not have to be realistic, it should include enough detail to show characteristics of the vertebrate group.

Reflection Questions

  • From using the exquisite corpse technique, what did we learn about animal classification?
  • How realistic was this; does this sort of cross-breeding happen in real ecosystems? Can we brainstorm some examples of this?
  • What sort of adaptations could we envision these critters having? How would these help them survive in their ecosystem?

Differentiation

Below Grade Level: Students will be provided with different pictures of invertebrates and vertebrates cut up into 3 sections (The head, torso, and legs). They will create a creature by gluing down the parts of the pictures. Student will roll a dice. They will paste down the body parts according to the number they roll:

  • 1= bird
  • 2 = fish
  • 3 = mammal
  • 4 = amphibian
  • 5 = reptile
  • 6 = invertebrate

EL Students:

Writing Accommodations:

ELP Level 1-2: Label critter’s characteristics directly on the poster using a word bank provided by the teacher. Picture and first language support should be used as needed for unknown vocabulary.

ELP Level 3-4: Students may type their critter descriptions in OneNote using the “Dictate” feature. Students can then copy the description to their poster. (OneNote>Learning Tools Add-in>Dictate)

ELP Level 5-6: Write a longer description including how their critter’s characteristics contribute to their ideal habitat.

Additional Resources

Appendix

  • Rubric for “Wanted” poster

Credits

Playing with Animals

Description

In this project, students will write a fictional play around the premise of a zookeeper trying to solve the problem of “the zoo just received several new animals and no one knows where each animal belongs”. The play will incorporate science content that will demonstrate student knowledge of animal classification. Students will also create 3-D masks to represent the animals in their play. To culminate this project, students will dramatize their play to an audience in order to express the inner workings of the animal classification system.

Learning Targets

“I Can…”

  • Write a play that illustrates how animals are sorted into groups: invertebrates, vertebrates and subgroups (mammals, fish, birds, reptiles, amphibians)
  • Create a 3-D animal mask that demonstrates multiple design concepts
  • Dramatize a play by developing, communicating, and sustaining a role within the script

Essential Questions

  • How can I develop a play that illustrates how animals are sorted into groups?
  • How can I create a visual artwork that clearly articulates the characteristics of vertebrates?
  • How can dramatizing a play help me to communicate and model scientific concepts?

Curriculum Standards

S5L1. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to group organisms using scientific classification procedures.

  1. Develop a model that illustrates how animals are sorted into groups (vertebrate and invertebrate) and how vertebrates are sorted into groups (fish, amphibian, reptile, bird, and mammal) using data from multiple sources.

ELACC5W3: Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences.

ELACC5W4: Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in Standards 1–3 above.)

ELAGSE5SL1: Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grade 5 topics and texts, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly.

Arts Standards

TAES5.2 Developing scripts through improvisation and other theatrical methods

  1. Uses a playwriting process (e.g., pre-write/pre-play; prepare to write/plan dramatization; write; dramatize; reflect and edit; re-write/play; publish/perform)
  2. Applies dramatic elements such as plot, point of view conflict, resolution, and significant events, in creating scripts
  3. Creates an organizing structure appropriate for purpose, audience and context

TAES5.3 Acting by developing, communicating, and sustaining roles within a variety of situations and environments

  1. Uses vocal elements such as inflection, pitch, and volume, to communicate the thoughts, emotions, and actions of a character
  2. Uses body and stage movement to communicate the thoughts, emotions, and actions of a character
  3. Uses imagination to make artistic choices in portraying characters
  4. Collaborates with an ensemble to create theatre
  5. Dramatizes literature and original scripts through various dramatic forms such as pantomime, process drama, puppetry, improvisation, plays, and readers’ theatre

Content Vocabulary

  • Vertebrate
  • Invertebrate
  • Mammal
  • Amphibian
  • Fish
  • Bird
  • Reptile
  • Insect
  • Classify
  • Group
  • Characteristics
  • Attribute
  • Similarities
  • Differences
  • Organism
  • Backbone
  • Warm-blooded
  • Cold-blooded
  • Reproduce

Arts Vocabulary

Vistual Art

  • Henri Rousseau: French post-impressionist painter in the Primitive manner. His subject matter was often ecosystems.
  • Three Dimensional: having or appearing to have length, breadth, and depth
  • Media: tools and materials used to create the art
  • Relief Sculpture: a technique where the sculpted elements remain attached to a solid background of the same material
  • Armature: skeleton for a sculpture
  • Subject Matter: things represented in artwork
  • Texture: surface quality of an object
  • Balance: Symmetrical equal portions along an axis

Theatre

  • Theater: play writing and performance
  • Character: specified role
  • Collaboration: people working together
  • Dialogue: conversation between characters
  • Playwright: person who writes a play
  • Setting: place of action
  • Concentration: ability to stay “in character”
  • Ensemble: all parts taken together
  • Stage blocking: where each character moves onstage

Technology Integration

The following technology integrations are meant to either replace the live play performance or to be used as an extension to the project. These are both green screen video presentation options.

Formative Assessment

  • Teacher Timeline Checklist (SEE DOWNLOADS)
  • Checking in with students as they are playwriting and creating their masks
  • Questioning during activities

Summative Assessment

  • Project 2 Rubric (SEE DOWNLOAD)
  • Task A; Play writing
  • Task B: Mask
  • Task C: Performance

Materials

Mask-making:

  • Rigid Wrap (plaster mesh)
  • small pans (for water for mesh wrap)
  • large sponge or cloth to wipe hands on while working
  • white face mask
  • newspaper or paper towel, masking tape (for armature)
  • tissue paper
  • feathers
  • faux animal fur sheets(or a bolt)
  • mesh netting
  • metallic paper(fish scales)
  • metallic paint(glossy finish to amphibian)
  • glue
  • acrylic paint

Play Performance:

  • Zookeeper hat

Activating Strategy (5-10 min)

  • Teacher will lead students in a “Story Chain” activity with pantomime when applicable.
  • This activity may work best with groups no larger than 6-7. (It is preferred that these groups be the same groups students will work in for the remainder of the project)
  • The “Story Chain” activity begins with a one line prompt. This can come from the teacher or from a student. An example could be, “Pat walks into a forest.”
  • Another student will add the next ONE sentence detail to the story, making sure to remain in 3rd person, as well as relate to the details mentioned before. For example, “Pat walks into a forest. Pat hears birds chirping.” This is not a good example, “Pat walks into a forest. Pat sees a dolphin jumping out of the ocean.” This is not a good example because you would not see a dolphin in the middle of a forest.
  • As a student shares their one sentence detail, they will pantomime the verb(s) within the sentence.
  • The activity continues with each student in the group adding a new detail to the story, making sure to remain in 3rd person, as well as relate to the details previously mentioned.
  • The goal of this activity is to get students listening to each other (they will have to do this when they collaboratively write their play), making ideas connect (their individual animal descriptions/details must connect within their play), and moving in ways related to what they are saying (in the play they will have to perform in the role they have chosen).
  • Disclaimer: Students can take the story in any direction they like; however, they just need to make sure the details lead them there. For instance, “Pat walks into a forest. Pat hears birds chirping. Now Pat is walking on the planet Pluto.” It is okay for Pat to end up on Pluto, the students just need to provide the details of how Pat gets there.

Main Activity

Part 1:
Writing the Play

  • If not done already from the activating activity, the teacher will place students into groups of 6-7 (group of 7 will have an added animal group of invertebrate).
  • Teacher will preview Theater (play writing) vocabulary with class (character, collaboration, dialogue, playwright, setting)
  • Students will pick roles: zoo keeper (narrator), mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian, fish (optional invertebrate).
  • Each group will compose a rough draft of their play. To begin, each student within the group will write at least 4 lines for the play that includes at least three characteristics of the vertebrate sub group they chose to portray (i.e., mammal, bird, etc.). The zookeeper should write questions to ask each “animal” character in order to help classify each animal. The zookeeper will need to work closely with each animal to ensure the zookeeper’s questions are answered by each animal. The zookeeper needs to be sure to “assign” each animal to a particular group in the zoo (which will be either the mammal group, bird group, reptile group, etc.)
  • The zookeeper can really take on a fun role by including the audience in the dialogue of the play. For instance, as the zookeeper discovers attributes of each animal he/she can ask the audience “yes or no” questions like “Hmmm, this animal has feathers. Does it belong in the amphibian group? etc.)
  • As a group, students will decide the order the characters will appear and compose the final script.
  • Teacher will formatively assess students during the writing process using the attached “Teacher Checklist” to ensure students remain on task. At the completion of the play writing, the teacher will use “Task A” rubric to summatively assess the written portion of the play.

Part 2:
Constructing the Mask
*Explore option of collaborating with art teacher to support time constraints; i.e., the art teacher has students create the plaster mask base in art class.

  • The teacher will briefly introduce the history, use, terminology and design concepts of masks being taught within this lesson (Relief sculpture, armature, balance) by viewing the following websites: www.thatartistwoman.org and www.hosmerart.blogspot.com. 5th grade plaster masks
  • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yI6vxANnHg video on making a plaster mask on face form
  • Students will design a mask of their selected animal using the PDF paper template attached. Students will plan the color, shape, texture, and armature(s) (extensions) of the mask.
  • At this point, hopefully the teacher is able to get students to construct the plaster mask within art class. If not, the teacher will need to instruct students on the plaster mask process.

Plaster Mask Process (using Rigid Wrap material)

  • Give each student a plastic mask template.
  • show youtube video on using plaster strips
  • Cut the Rigid Wrap into strips (approx.. 2” wide, length is dependent on style of mask); smaller pieces for certain areas.
  • Students can build the armature off the base mask to create features such as horns, fins, ears, snouts, etc. using newspaper, paper towels and masking tape
  • Once the form has been built, students may begin the plaster process.
  • Dip the Rigid Wrap strip into warm water until it begins to soften and then place on the mask form.
  • Smooth with finger.
  • Continue to layer the strips and overlap until the mask form has been covered.
  • Allow to dry overnight.

Part 3:

  • After the plaster masks are dry, students will use paint, glue, and texture materials to decorate mask. Students will include appropriate media for their selected animal (faux fur for mammal, mesh netting for reptile or fish, feathers for bird, metallic paper or paint for amphibian).
  • Teacher will formatively assess during the process of Day 2 and 3 using the “Teacher Checklist” attached and will also summatively assess using the “Task B” rubric attached.

Part 4: Dramatizing the Play

  • On day 4, each group will need to rehearse its play, focusing on individual volume, tone, and character concentration. Groups will also need to focus on the ensemble and stage blocking of each character to ensure group collaboration.

Part 5:

  • Each group will dramatize the play for an audience.
  • Teacher will summatively assess using the attached “Task C” rubric.

Classroom Tips:

  • Allow adequate time for the creative process. (The unit duration is 3-5 days; however, portions of the project could be left out or extended as the teacher sees fit.)
  • On the plaster mask creating day, prepare the classroom for easy clean up by covering tables and desks with butcher paper or newspaper. Have towels available for spills and for students to wipe hands at the conclusion of activity.
  • On the play dramatization day, create a “stage” area at the front of the classroom to provide students a designated area to perform. It is suggested to also create an area for the audience.

Reflection Questions

  • How did the dramatization help you model the classification of animals?
  • How did creating the animal mask help you understand the characteristics/attributes of your animal group?
  • How did writing your character’s role in the group’s play help you communicate the characteristics/attributes of your animal group?
  • Is there anything about your group’s project you would like to change in order to make better?
  • Name 1 “glow” and 1 “grow” for your personal contribution to your group’s performance.

Differentiation

Below Grade Level: Provide students with an example of an animal with the characteristics of both invertebrates and vertebrates. Direct students to act out each animal sound. Limit the audience size for students reluctant to perform for a large group.

Above Grade Level: Provide students with the opportunity to include animal adaptation in the storyline of their script. Also let them consider writing an epilogue to their play. This would include writing about what happens to the characters “after” the story is resolved.

Additional Resources

  • “Goodnight Gorilla” by Peggy Rathmann (could also be used as an activating activity)
  • www.thatartistwoman.org – plaster masks
  • www.hosmerart.blogspot.com – plaster masks 5th grade
  • Classes could pair with 1st grade classes to perform plays. At the conclusion of performances, 5th grade students can pair with 1st grade students to complete reflection questions.
  • For an extension of this particular project, technology can be incorporated in many ways.  One way that technology can be incorporated is by using the apps of Dolnk, or Touchcast. These apps are green screen apps that the students can use to create and produce backgrounds if they chose not to perform the play production in a live setting.  The students will record using an iPad or mobile device and the production can then be played back for other students at a later time.

Appendix

  • Rubric for this project
  • Mask Template
  • Teacher Checklist

Credits

Grade 5: Classy Classification of Animals

Additional Resources

Books

  • Goodnight Gorilla by Peggy Rathmann

Websites
The teacher will play a song about animal classification found on YouTube.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ya-7JsIna2E (the actual song begins at 2:10; however, there is relative information in the first two minutes)

Quavermusic.com – for music

Exquisite Corpse - http://www.lacma.org/sites/default/files/DrawingLessonPlans.pdf

Animal masks - www.thatartistwoman.org

Animal masks - www.hosmerart.blogspot.com

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This week we are kicking off the school year with these terrific teachers at LaBelle Elementary in Cobb County! We are spending this week curriculum mapping and doing collaborative planning sessions for arts integration in classrooms. Stay tuned for the finished school map! 😊Image attachment

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