FEELING THE MOTION THROUGH FORCE

Grade 2: Feeling the Motion Through Force

Unit Description

In this unit, students will obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to explain the effect of a force in the movement of an object. Students will use visual arts, music, and theater to investigate force and motion. There will also be an opportunity for cross curricular connections in the Social Studies classroom. Students will explore how famous historical figures used their own force to set change into motion. Students explore the literal force of their voices and the figurative voice by studying their words. This unit also invites students to participate in writing activities to synthesize their learning.

Unit Essential Question

How can various forms of the arts be used to explore forces and motion?
How can we identify force and motion throughout everyday living?

Real World Context

Students can identify force and motion throughout everyday living by building a foundation for their understanding of systems and simple machines, which will be taught in future grade level standards. This project also has a real world connection to famous historical figures who used their voices to be a “force” of change.

Cross-Cutting Interdisciplinary Concepts

Cause/Effect
Pattern
Repetition

Projects

Project 1: Painting to the Beat
Who doesn’t love creating an abstract painting using water balloons and all while simultaneously learning about the science topic: forces and motion? In this project, students will immerse in a visual arts activity that explores force and motion. This will be done by using dynamics and tempo to create some messy wild art. This project may be messy but it will create a clear connection between visual art, music and the science topic: forces and motion!

Project 2: Peace in Motion
Students explore the impact of leaders in history by examining their voices and the force behind them. In this project, students will research important Georgia Leaders to discover how they used force in their actions and voices to make a difference in the world. This project uniquely fuses together concepts in social studies as well as science and this project also integrates high yield ELA writing strategies. Students will have the opportunity to explore their own vocal force by practicing public speaking and presenting their speeches to an audience.

Project 3: Rolling into Art
In this project, students will use force and motion to create a visual art piece using marbles and paint. The students will investigate how the size of marbles will affect the speed of the marbles when rolled through paint. The students will then compare and contrast their artwork to the work of Jackson Pollock.

Project Essential Questions

PROJECT 1:
How could the force of applying paint to paper change when painting to different musical dynamics and tempos?

PROJECT 2:
How did famous Georgians: Martin Luther King, Jackie Robinson, and Rosa Parks use their voice to show feeling through force?

  • How did each civil rights leader use force in their voice to make a difference?
  • How can I use a strong voice to perform my speech?

PROJECT 3:
How does the size of the marble effect the speed of the marble through the paint and the thickness of the paint line when creating a painting?

Standards

Curriculum Standards

S2P2. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to explain the effect of a force (a push or a pull) in the movement of an object (changes in speed and direction).

  1. Plan and carry out an investigation to demonstrate how pushing and pulling on an object affects the motion of the object.
  2. Design a device to change the speed or direction of an object.
  3. Record and analyze data to decide if a design solution works as intended to change the speed or direction of an object with a force (a push or a pull).

SS2H1 The student will read about and describe the lives of historical figures in Georgia history.

  1. Identify the contributions made by these historic figures: Jackie Robinson (sports) and Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights.

ELAGSE2RL3: Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges

ELAGSE2W2: Write informative/explanatory in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points and provide a concluding statement or section.

ELAGSE2W7: Participate in shared research and writing projects.

ELAGSE2W8: Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.

Arts Standards

VA2MC.2 Formulates personal responses.

  1. Produces multiple interpretations for an object or image.

VA2CU.2 Views and discusses selected artworks.
VA2PR.1 Creates artworks based on personal experience and selected themes.

  1. Creates artworks emphasizing one or more elements of art (e.g., space, line, shape, form, color, value, texture) and principles of design (e.g., balance, repetition).
  2. Combines materials in new and inventive ways to make a finished work of art.

VA2PR.2 Understands and applies media, techniques, and processes of two-dimensional art processes (drawing, painting, printmaking, mixed-media) using tools and materials in a safe and appropriate manner to develop skills.

  1. Creates paintings with a variety of media (e.g., tempera, watercolor).

VA2PR.4 Participates in appropriate exhibition(s) of artworks.

  1. Writes a title that describes his or her finished work of art.
  2. Writes an artist’s statement by reflecting on finished artwork.

VA2AR.1 Discusses his or her artwork and the artwork of others.

MGGM.6 Listening to, analyzing, and describing music

TAES2.3 Acting by developing, communicating and sustaining roles within a variety of situations and environments

  1. Communicates a characters actions, motives, emotions and traits, through voice, speech, and language
  2. Communicates a characters though, emotions and actions through movements

Character Education

Components

Pair with a 4th grade Science class to assist in the real world application of forces and motion.

Summative Assessments

  • Pre/ Post Test
  • Project 1 Rubric (Painting to the Beat)
  • Project 2 Rubric (Peace in Motion)
  • Project 3 Rubric (Rolling into Art)

Partnering with Fine Arts Teachers

Music Teacher:

  • The music teacher can assist in teaching of music terminology for Project 1.

Visual Arts Teacher:

  • The visual arts teacher can assist in teaching of art vocabulary for Project 1 and 3.

Physical Education Teacher:

  • The physical education teacher can assist in the teaching of throwing objects with and without force in Project 1.

Appendix (See Additional Resources)

  • Pre/Post-Test

Credits

Lisa Keasler, Tammy Owen, Edited by Jessica Espinoza, Edited by Dr. Carla Cohen

Painting to the Beat

Description

Who doesn’t love creating an abstract painting using water balloons and all while simultaneously learning about the science topic: forces and motion? In this project, students will immerse in a visual arts activity that explores force and motion. This will be done by using dynamics and tempo to create some messy wild art. This project may be messy but it will create a clear connection between visual art, music and the science topic: forces and motion!

Learning Targets

“I Can…”

  • Use the visual arts to express different forces and motion
  • Use the visual arts to express dynamics and tempos of music
  • Synthesize my understanding of forces and motion using a digital reflection

Essential Questions

  • How could the force of applying paint to paper change when painting to different musical dynamics and tempos?

Curriculum Standards

S2P2. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to explain the effect of a force (a push or a pull) in the movement of an object (changes in speed and direction).

  1. Plan and carry out an investigation to demonstrate how pushing and pulling on an object affects the motion of the object.
  2. Design a device to change the speed or direction of an object.
  3. Record and analyze data to decide if a design solution works as intended to change the speed or direction of an object with a force (a push or a pull).

ELAGSE2W2: Write informative/explanatory in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points and provide a concluding statement or section.

Arts Standards

VA2PR.2 Understands and applies media, techniques, and processes of two-dimensional art processes (drawing, painting, printmaking, mixed-media) using tools and materials in a safe and appropriate manner to develop skills.

  1. Creates paintings with a variety of media (e.g., tempera, watercolor).

VA2PR.4 Participates in appropriate exhibition(s) of artworks.

  1. Writes a title that describes his or her finished work of art.
  2. Writes an artist’s statement by reflecting on finished artwork.

VA2AR.1 Discusses his or her artwork and the artwork of others.

MGGM.6 Listening to, analyzing, and describing music

Content Vocabulary

  • Force
  • Motion
  • Push
  • Pull

Arts Vocabulary

  • Beat: pulse underlying music
  • Tempo: speed of the beat
  • Dynamics: loud/soft volume
  • Color: an element of art with three properties, hue, intensity, and value
  • Visual Rhythm: indicates a type of movement by repeated shapes, lines, or colors
  • Musical Rhythm: pattern of long and short sounds
  • Media: tools and materials an artist uses

Technology Integration

Formative Assessment

  • Teacher will observe the students as they use force and motion to create a visual art piece
  • Teacher will observe the students during the reflection process
  • Teacher will observe the students as they create their video reflection

Summative Assessment

  • Project 1 Rubric (See Download)

Materials

Book: Action Jackson (1 per classroom):
https://www.amazon.com/Action-Jackson-Jan-Greenberg/dp/0312367511/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1496409725&sr=8-1&keywords=jackson+pollock+kids+book

Tempera Paints (1 set of 5 per class):
https://store.schoolspecialty.com/OA_HTML/ibeCCtpItmDspRte.jsp?minisite=10206&item=2993874

White Sheets (5 per classroom):
https://www.amazon.com/Utopia-Bedding-Brushed-Microfiber-Sheet/dp/B00XK9CQ6E/ref=sr_1_9?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1496412127&sr=1-9&keywords=white+sheets

Water Balloons (Red, Yellow, Blue, Green, Orange, Purple) 1 pack of 500 per grade level:
https://www.amazon.com/Water-Balloons-Assorted-Colors-include/dp/B01HBY7IZC/ref=sr_1_19?s=toys-and-games&ie=UTF8&qid=1496412524&sr=119&keywords=water+balloons

Bean Bags (2 sets per class):
https://store.schoolspecialty.com/OA_HTML/ibeCCtpItmDspRte.jsp?minisite=10206&item=87644

Plain White Construction Paper:
https://store.schoolspecialty.com/OA_HTML/ibeCCtpItmDspRte.jsp?minisite=10206&item=3467060

Activating Strategy (5-10 min)

Main Activity

PROCESS:

  • After reading Action Jackson, announce to the students that they will create a visual art piece representing different dynamics and tempos in music using balloons filled with slightly watered down paint.
  • Communication Assessment: Students will reflect/ explain how the force of their throw determined the speed and direction of the splattered paint. The teacher may choose the appropriate technology for the video reflection according to school availability (Chatter-pix, Office-Mix, Sway, etc).

Part 1:

  • In groups of 4-5, the students will assign a value to each color (red, yellow, green, blue, orange, and purple) based on the dynamics (soft, loud) and tempo (fast, medium, slow) of the music piece they are creating. Each group will include at least three of the choices (soft, loud, fast, medium, and/or slow).
  • The students will make inferences about force and motion. They will do this by predicting how the transfer the music creation onto the construction paper would look using crayons corresponding to the colors of the beat they chose.
  • Then using the colored beanbags and throwing them against a white sheet based on the dynamics and beats assigned, the students will rehearse. Their throwing of the beanbags should be rehearsed with the music piece selected. The force and motion of how they throw the beanbags should correspond with the musical dynamic or tempo assigned.

Part 2:

  • Then the students will create their own masterpiece on a white fabric sheet using the paint filled water balloons following the music piece on construction paper. Remind students to throw the water balloons as they rehearsed them with the bean bags the previous day. Refer to the video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=Jl4FPk_-hk8 . This video will help explain how this painting activity can be set up.

Part 3:

  • Students will reflect/ explain how the force of their throw determined the speed and direction of the splattered paint. The teacher may choose the appropriate technology according to school availability (Chatter-pix, Office-Mix, Sway, etc). Students will capture a digital reflection of students’ explanation of how the music and paint water balloons correlate with the concept of force and motion.

Classroom Tips:

  • The teacher will put the students in heterogeneous groups of 4 to 5 before Part 1.
  • Students will perform paint balloon activity outdoors.
  • Instruct students to wear clothing they can get messy. (Have Smocks or old t-shirts available).
  • Students can take their shoes off if needed for this activity.

Reflection Questions

  • How did you choose colors to represent differing music dynamics (loud and soft)?
  • How does the speed of your throw relate to music tempo (fast, slow, medium)?
  • How does force of the throw change the look of the splattered paint?

Differentiation

Below Grade Level: The teacher will provide a graphic organizer for color coordination regarding beat and tempo. The teacher will provide a sentence frame for students that are below grade level or ELL students.

Above Grade Level: Create a musical composition using Quaver or other musical website. Students may also research Jackson Pollock and Kandinsky using materials from the library and various websites.

EL Students:

  • Provide a word bank for written reflection
  • Small Group for the written reflection

Additional Resources

  • IPads
  • Computers
  • Quaver
  • Chatterpix
  • Office 365

Appendix

  • Rubric for Project 1

Credits

Peace in Motion

Description

Students explore the impact of leaders in history by examining their voices and the force behind them. In this project, students will research important Georgia Leaders to discover how they used force in their actions and voices to make a difference in the world. This project uniquely fuses together concepts in social studies as well as science and this project also integrates high yield ELA writing strategies. Students will have the opportunity to explore their own vocal force by practicing public speaking and presenting their speeches to an audience.

Learning Targets

“I Can…”

  • Explain how important leaders in Georgia history used force to make changes that affected the world
  • Use digital resources to research important Civil Rights Leaders
  • Create a persuasive speech to address a real world problem in relation to the biographies of those studied
  • Use a strong voice with force to perform the speech I wrote

Essential Questions

  • How did famous Georgians: Martin Luther King, Jackie Robinson, and Rosa Parks use their voice to show feeling through force?
  • How did each civil rights leader use force in their voice to make a difference?
  • How can I use a strong voice to perform my speech?

Curriculum Standards

SS2H1 The student will read about and describe the lives of historical figures in Georgia history.

  1. Identify the contributions made by these historic figures: Jackie Robinson (sports) and Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights.

ELAGSE2RL3: Describe how characters in a story respond to major events and challenges

ELAGSE2W2: Write informative/explanatory in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points and provide a concluding statement or section.

ELAGSE2W7: Participate in shared research and writing projects.

ELAGSE2W8: Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question.

Arts Standards

TAES2.3 Acting by developing, communicating and sustaining roles within a variety of situations and environments

  1. Communicates a characters actions, motives, emotions and traits, through voice, speech, and language
  2. Communicates a characters though, emotions and actions through movements

Content Vocabulary

  • Force
  • Motion
  • Civil Rights
  • Freedom

Arts Vocabulary

  • Character: an actor or actress in a specified role
  • Diction: using a clear and crisp actor voice that can be understood
  • Gesture: an expressive movement of the body or limbs
  • Facial Expression: using your face to show emotion
  • Projection: using a “big” actor voice so that you can be heard in the very back row a space

Technology Integration

When students conduct their research, www.pebblego.com is a great resource for the biographies of MLK Jr., Jackie Robinson, and Ruby Bridges

Educational Videos on MLK:

Educational Videos on Jackie Robinson:

Educational Resources on Ruby Bridges:

Formative Assessment

  • Teacher will observe students working and check in routinely with the small groups
  • Teacher will monitor and provide feedback to students on their writings

Summative Assessment

  • Student writing
  • Project 2 Rubric (See Downloads)

Materials

Activating Strategy (5-10 min)

  • Teacher will show video of Martin Luther King Jr. “I Have a Dream Speech.”
    (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=smEqnnklfYs)

      After showing the video of Martin Luther King Jr. “I Have a Dream Speech”, the students will answer questions based on prior knowledge:

    • What did you notice about Martin Luther King’s gestures in his speech?
    • How did Martin Luther King use force (expression/volume) in his voice?
    • Describe the changes in Martin Luther King’s facial expressions throughout the speech?

Main Activity

Part 1:

  • Teacher will review key excerpts from research, select books and resources to discuss our background knowledge of these key Civil Rights Leaders: Martin Luther King Jr, Jackie Robinson, and Ruby Bridges.
  • On chart paper, students will make a list of how each Civil Rights leader used forces in their actions and voices to make a difference in the world.

Part 2:

  • The students will then write a persuasive speech to show a real world problem faced in school today and present the solution to the problem by stating at least three strong supporting reasons.
      Examples (not limited to these):

    • No homework/too much homework
    • Need more recess time
    • More fruits and vegetables in children’s diets
  • After students write their speech, they will use a strong voice to perform the speech they wrote.

Part 3:

  • The teacher will discuss important theatre components that will help make the speech theatrical: gestures, expression, character, and projection. Students will then practice their speech applying these components.
  • Pair students up to practice for their partner and provide peer feedback to one another
  • Once the speeches have been well-rehearsed, schedule a time for students to present them for an audience. This can be another classroom or an event where parents are invited to attend.

Classroom Tips:

  • The teacher will create a schedule of student performances prior to Part 3 in project. Consider putting a time limit on the speeches so they can all be performed in a timely manner.

Reflection Questions

  • How did Martin Luther King Jr. use his voice to show feeling through force?
  • How did Jackie Robinson use his voice to show feeling through force?
  • How did Ruby Bridges use her voice to show feeling through force?
  • How did each civil rights leader use force in their voice to make a difference?
  • How can I use a strong voice to perform my speech?
  • How did my knowledge of force and motion help me to perform my speech?

Differentiation

Below Grade Level: Pair below grade level students with a higher level student to assist with research. Provide leveled informational biography books for each student to conduct their research which include pictures, graphics, and other visual support. Students may need more assistance with the completion of their persuasive speech. Students can also use a word bank to assist with the completion of the persuasive speech.

Above Grade Level: Encourage these students to make a Sway or PowerPoint presentation on what they learned.

EL Students: Provide a word bank to help with the completion of the persuasive speech.

Additional Resources

Appendix

  • Rubric for Project 2

Credits

Rolling into Art

Description

In this project, students will use force and motion to create a visual art piece using marbles and paint. The students will investigate how the size of marbles will affect the speed of the marbles when rolled through paint. The students will then compare and contrast their artwork to the work of Jackson Pollock.

Learning Targets

“I Can…”

  • Create an art piece using different media and force
  • Can reflect on my art piece and how it relates to force and motion
  • Compare and contrast my artwork to the work of Jackson Pollock

Essential Questions

  • How does the size of the marble effect the speed of the marble through the paint and the thickness of the paint line when creating a painting?

Curriculum Standards

S2P2. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to explain the effect of a force (a push or a pull) in the movement of an object (changes in speed and direction).

  1. Plan and carry out an investigation to demonstrate how pushing and pulling on an object affects the motion of the object.
  2. Design a device to change the speed or direction of an object.
  3. Record and analyze data to decide if a design solution works as intended to change the speed or direction of an object with a force (a push or a pull).

SS2H1 The student will read about and describe the lives of historical figures in Georgia history.

  1. Identify the contributions made by these historic figures: Jackie Robinson (sports) and Martin Luther King, Jr. (civil rights.

ELAGSE2W2: Write informative/explanatory in which they introduce a topic, use facts and definitions to develop points and provide a concluding statement or section.

Arts Standards

VA2MC.2 Formulates personal responses.

  1. Produces multiple interpretations for an object or image.

VA2PR.1 Creates artworks based on personal experience and selected themes.

  1. Creates artworks emphasizing one or more elements of art (e.g., space, line, shape, form, color, value, texture) and principles of design (e.g., balance, repetition).
  2. Combines materials in new and inventive ways to make a finished work of art.

VA2PR.2 Understands and applies media, techniques, and processes of two-dimensional art processes (drawing, painting, printmaking, mixed-media) using tools and materials in a safe and appropriate manner to develop skills.

  1. Creates paintings with a variety of media (e.g., tempera, watercolor).

VA2PR.4 Participates in appropriate exhibition(s) of artworks.

  1. Writes a title that describes his or her finished work of art.
  2. Writes an artist’s statement by reflecting on finished artwork.

VA2AR.1 Discusses his or her artwork and the artwork of others.

Content Vocabulary

  • Force
  • Speed
  • Motion
  • Push
  • Pull
  • Investigation

Arts Vocabulary

  • Jackson Pollock: an American painter and a major figure in the abstract expressionist movement
  • Color: an element of art with three properties, hue, intensity, and value
  • Primary Colors: any of a group of colors from which all other colors can be obtained by mixing, including red, yellow and blue
  • Secondary Colors: a color resulting from mixing two primary colors together
  • Media: tools and materials an artist uses
  • Proportion: gives a sense of size seen as a relationship of objects, such as smallness or largeness
  • Line: an element of art which refers to the continuous mark made on some surface by a moving point
  • Shape: an enclosed space defined by other elements of art

Technology Integration

Formative Assessment

  • Teacher will observe the students for the understanding of forces and motion.
  • Teacher will observe the students as they use forces and motion to create a visual art piece in the style of Jackson Pollock.
  • Teacher will observe the students during the reflection process.
  • Teacher will observe the students as they create their written reflection.

Summative Assessment

  • Teacher will use the rubric provided to assess student on science content, art process, and final product.

Materials

Activating Strategy (5-10 min)

  • Show the Museum of Modern Art’s video about Jackson Pollock: https://www.moma.org/multimedia/video/123/687
  • Brainstorm on chart paper with a shoulder partner around the following questions:
    • What sort of lines and shapes did you see in the video demonstration?
    • What do you notice about his technique and how it affects the paint?
    • What was the cause and effect of the amount of force he exerted and the amount of paint that splattered on the canvas?

Main Activity

PROCESS:

  • Refer back to the book “Action Jackson” as needed from the Unit Overview (Project 1).
  • Announce to students that they will use their knowledge of force and motion to create a visual art piece using marbles, paper, and various colors of paint.

Part 1:

  • Place students in small groups of 3-4 students.
  • Give each student a piece of white art paper for the artmaking activity.
  • Set up the needed materials for the activity (1 copy paper box lid per 2 students, different size marbles, and one piece white construction paper).
  • Direct students to write their name on the back of their paper.
  • Model for the students the correct way to roll the marbles back and forth and side to side.
  • Direct the students to put the paper in the copy paper box lid.
  • The teacher will squirt 3 to 4 colors, chosen by the student, onto the paper.
  • The student will drop the marbles of different sizes into the paint and will begin to carefully roll the marbles back and forth and side to side.
  • Repeat these steps with the other partner.
  • This activity can also be facilitated by students rotating around the room in stations. Each station can explore a different size marble and have a different color assigned to it.
  • Ask students to use the Lab Recording Sheet (SEE DOWNLOADS) as they rotate to stations making their art.

Part 2:

  • After the artwork has dried, the students will give their artwork a title. Next, the students will notice lines and shapes in their painting. On chart paper, students can reflect what they saw in relation to the different size marbles and the different amount of force used.
  • Students will complete a Venn Diagram comparing/contrasting their work with the work of Jackson Pollock.
  • Reflect with students around the following questions:
    • My painting is similar to Jackson Pollock because they both have _______________________.”
    • My painting is different than Jackson Pollock because ____________________.

Classroom Tips:

  • Each student will create their own painting using different size marbles and tempera paint. Depending on the length of time they each have to roll the marbles around, you might think about how many colors will be used and what those colors are. Consider using 2 primary colors, which will make a secondary color as lines cross back and forth (red, yellow=orange). OR choosing only warm colors (red, yellow, orange) or only cool colors (blue, green, purple). This teaches/reinforces color theory and may save some students from getting a muddy mix (3 primary colors mixed together make brown).

Reflection Questions

  • How does the size of the object effect the change in the speed and direction of the marble?
  • How do the markings differ from the small marble to the large marble?
  • How is your painting similar to those by Jackson Pollock?

Differentiation

Below Grade Level: The teacher will provide a writing template and word bank or flashcards for students that are below grade level or EL students. Project requirements such as number of marbles/colors used will be modified according to student abilities.

Above Grade Level: Write a story about what they see in their artwork.

EL Students: Provide a word bank and support a small group with this activity.

Additional Resources

Appendix

  • Rubric for project 3
  • Lab Recording Sheet

Credits

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This week we are kicking off the school year with these terrific teachers at LaBelle Elementary in Cobb County! We are spending this week curriculum mapping and doing collaborative planning sessions for arts integration in classrooms. Stay tuned for the finished school map! 😊Image attachment

This week we are kicking off the school year with these terrific teachers at LaBelle Elementary in Cobb County! We are spending this week curriculum mapping and doing collaborative planning sessions for arts integration in classrooms. Stay tuned for the finished school map! 😊 ... See MoreSee Less